Amph 1001 Comics You Must Read Before You Die: Peter and Ping (1922)

Discussion in 'Archive: The Amphitheatre' started by Nevermind, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Yes, yes, I know there is another thread on exactly this subject, but this source book is different--starts earlier and moves faster. Since there have been plenty of complaints about the other list (though I am enjoying it), I thought another one wouldn't hurt, esp. as I'm learning a helluva lot about the history of the genre from both lists.

    1. "The Adventures of Mr. Obadiah Oldbuck" (1837) by [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodolphe_T%C3%B6pffer]Rodolphe Topffer[/link]

    [image=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/43/Vieuxbois1.jpg]

    Title in original language: Les Amours de Mr. Vieux Bois

    First published by: Self-published

    Creator: Swiss (1799-1846)

    Genre: Humour, Adventure

    Topffer was a francophone schoolmaster prevented from eye disease from becoming an artist. He developed pictorial tales in the 1820s and in 1827, he finished a long story of what would now be called a comic, relating the adventures of Mr. Vieux-Bois (Mr. Ham-Handed). "The strip resembled a chase movie, full of action & mishap. Whether or not he invented the comic, Topffer establishing cutting, montage, and timing techniques as never before."

    There was no copyright then, so it was pirated under the above name in England in 1841, and in the USA in 1842 as "Brother Jonathan Extra".

  2. Ramza JC Head Admin and RPF Manager

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2008
    star 7
    Well.

    Well.

    That just shattered my entire perception of when the medium began - I thought it was the early 1900s' comic strip collections.
  3. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
  4. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    2. [link=http://www.indyworld.com/indy/summer_2004/kartalopoulos_dore/index.html]The History Of Holy Russia[/link]

    by Gustave Doré

    Original publisher: J. Bry Ainé (France)

    First published: 1854

    Reviewed by: Pedro Moura

    Genre: Historical

    This is Dore's fourth and last comic book. At first, he imitated Topffer. This is very ambitious, involving more than a hundred illustrated pages with 500-plus illustrations, each a wood block. It has a distinctly propagandist tone, and was a failure.



  5. Chancellor_Ewok Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 8, 2004
    star 6
    Me three. I always thought of comic books as solely being a 20th Century phenomenon.
  6. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_and_Moritz]Max & Moritz[/link]

    by [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Busch]Wilhelm Busch[/link]

    Original publisher: Self-published (Germany)

    First published: 1865

    Reviewed by: Matthias Schneider

    Genre: Humour

    The inspiration for the Katzenjammer Kids.



  7. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    This book looks interesting. It takes a totally different tack than the other one. I think they're great complements to each other. I like the issue based approach of the other book, but I also like the wider lens, more content style of this one.
  8. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Ally Sloper

    [image=http://forbiddenplanet.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/07/Ally%20Slopers%20half%20day%20holiday%201886%20Coconino%20summer%20special.jpg]

    by Charles Henry Ross & Marie Duval

    Original publisher: Judy (UK)

    First published: 1867

    Reviewed by: Roger Sabin

    Genre: Humour

    "Ally Sloper was arguably the first comcis superstar due his huge popularity in print and on stage. He was a Victorian antihero--a drunkard and ne'er-do-well, recognizable by his huge red nose swollen by alcohol, his shabby suit (often with a bottle poking out of the back pocket), crumpled hat, and puatched-up umbrella. His genesis can be traced to 1867 in "Judy", a rival of the British magazine "Punch"...Charles Ross was his creator, but his mannerisms owed much to Ross's wife, Emily Louisa Tessier (aka Marie Duval), who took up cartooning duties from 1869.

    Cruikshank and Busch were obvious influences, [though] art historian David Kunzle credits Duval with the use of tecniques (distortions, unusual viewpoints) that only became standard in cartooning much later."
  9. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    Wow, look at that art. What a grotesque. In a good way, I mean.
  10. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "Balthazar's Feast" (1881)

    Title in original language: "Un Festin de Balthazar"

    First published by: "La Vie Militarie journal (France)

    Creator: Emmanuel Poire (French, 1958-1909)

    Genre: Humour

    Born in Moscow, he used the pseudonym: [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caran_d%27Ache]'Caran D'ache'[/link], and specialized in 'wordless' stories.

  11. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "Stuff and Nonsense" (1884)

    [image=http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-16pmTWLBY5g/TYEyLyKYCsI/AAAAAAAATfI/LTA1C27iO6c/s400/Frost%2BTop.jpg]

    First published by: Charles Scribner's Sons (USA)

    Creator: [link=http://john-adcock.blogspot.com/2011/03/arthur-burdett-frost-1851-1928.html]Arthur Burdett Frost (1851-1928)[/link]

    Genre: Humour

    A staff cartoonist for Harper's Monthly. Pioneering work in time lapse and sequential imaging.





  12. Ramza JC Head Admin and RPF Manager

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2008
    star 7
    Heh. That's funny in a New Yorker cartoon sort of way.
  13. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "The Fenouillard Family" (1889) by Christophe

    Title in original language: "La famille Fenouillard"

    First published by: Le Petit Francois Illustre (France)

    Creator: Marie Oouis Georges Colomb (French 1856-1945)

    Genre: Satire, adventure

    [link=http://www.sienese-shredder.com/2/christophe-the_fenouillard_family_at_the_1889_exhibition.html]The Sienese Shredder[/link]

  14. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "The Yellow Kid" (1894) by Richard Felton Outcault

    First published by: Truth Magazine (USA)

    Creator: American (1863-1928)

    Genre: Humour

    Award: Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame (2008)

    [image=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a3/1896-11-15_Yellow_Kid.jpg/250px-1896-11-15_Yellow_Kid.jpg]

    [image=http://xroads.virginia.edu/~ma04/wood/ykid/images/comicartists/yk_trolley.jpg]

    [image=http://cartoons.osu.edu/yellowkid/1896/march/1896-3-15.jpg]

    Outcault's day job was a drafter for Thomas Edison...
  15. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    Some good detail stuff there.
  16. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "The Katzenjammer Kids" (1897) by Rudolph Dirks

    First published by: New York Journal (USA)

    Creator: American (1877-1968)

    Genre: Humour

    Adaptation: Silent short film (1898)

    [image=http://blog.rifftrax.com/wp-content/uploads/kk-1935.jpg]

    "Katzenjammer" is a German term meaning (literally) cats howling outside, but it is also a colloquial term for hangover. It's based on 'Max and Moritz', which was unknown outside the German immigrant population. Dirks popularized sequential narrative, word balloons, and several elements of visual shorthand, including speed lines, beads of sweat, and the sawing of wood = snoring. When he wanted to take a break, he was refused; he left anyway, and the newspaper gave the strip to Harold Knerr (also talented). Lawsuits ensued; Dirks was given ownership of his characters, while the paper retained the name. Knerr continued the strip in the Journal, and Dirks wrote "The Captain and the Kids" for the New York World.
  17. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "Happy Hooligan" (1900) by Frederick Burr Opper

    First published by: New York Journal (USA)

    Creator: American (1857-1937)

    Genre: Humour

    Adaptation: Silent short film (1900)

    Adventures of an Irish-American homeless hobo.

    [image=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/e/e4/Happyhooligan4905.jpg/270px-Happyhooligan4905.jpg]

  18. A Chorus of Disapproval New Films Tyrant

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Aug 19, 2003
    star 8
    Nevermind, this is probably my favorite thread you've ever started. So far, your selections have been spot on. Katzenjammer was so influential to the guys who grew up to become the Silver Age comic book standard bearers. I have collections of everything you've posted so far. The medium goes back centuries and encompassed a lot, if people consider offerings such as penny dreadfuls.

    Cannot wait for this list to grow. Little Nemo in Slumberland, The Spirit, Lil' Abner, and everything in between and down to stuff like Calvin & Hobbes and Boondocks.

    Brilliant thread.
  19. A Chorus of Disapproval New Films Tyrant

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Aug 19, 2003
    star 8
    That's exactly what I felt from it, too. That cartoon has Cobean, Arno, or Addams written all over it.
  20. Ramza JC Head Admin and RPF Manager

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2008
    star 7
    I'm really enjoying the diversity of the picks, and I'd imagine this list is going to benefit from its larger timespan.
  21. A Chorus of Disapproval New Films Tyrant

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Aug 19, 2003
    star 8
    Agreed on both. It's already inspired, but has endless inspiration yet to draw from. I'm probably going to fall in love with Prince Valiant just from whatever snippet Nevermind opts to post, even though I already own the entirety of Hal Foster's run on the series. :p
  22. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    I'm flattered you think these are my picks, but they come from the book of the same name.

    Yes, Prince Valiant is coming up. And so are some oldies that the grandparental units used to read to us, so it's Memory Lane. Wish I still had those comics (sigh).

    This list starts earlier and moves much faster than the other one.
  23. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "Buster Brown" (1902) by Richard Felton Outcault

    First published by: New York Herald (USA)

    Creator: American (1863-1928)

    Genre: Humour

    Adaptation: TV (1951)

    Outcault is best known as the creator of "The Yellow Kid". "Buster Brown" is more upscale, but he's as much of a hellion. He is contrite at the end of every strip, and philosophical. But he's in trouble again by the start of the next one. The forefather of Dennis the Menace and Bart Simpson.

    [image=http://kickshawproductions.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/10.06.11-Buster-Brown-comic.bmp]



  24. Ramza JC Head Admin and RPF Manager

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2008
    star 7
    The dog is weirdly existential. "Time" indeed.8-}
  25. Nevermind Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "The Upside Downs" (1908) by Gustave Verbeek

    Original Title: "The Upside Downs of Little Lady Lovekins and Old Man Muffaroo"

    First Published By: The New York Herald (USA)

    Creator: American (1867-1937)

    Genre: Humour

    The book calls this a "masterpiece of applied thought"

    [link=http://www.sundaypressbooks.com/updownbook.php]Gustave Verbeek[/link]

    Note that the they tell a different story upside down...