Senate 1001 Days That Shaped the World! Disc. Gauls Attack Rome & Lay Siege to the Capitol (July, 390 BCE)

Discussion in 'Archive: The Senate Floor' started by Rogue1-and-a-half, Nov 10, 2008.

  1. Champion of the Force Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 27, 1999
    star 4
    Don't know if that event really 'shaped the world' though. Sparta had a go at an empire itself (backed by Persia) but couldn't hack it; Athens ended up re-rising again (though weaker) and the nation states of Greece spent the next few decades squabbling with each other until Philip and Alexander said hello from Macedonia.

    Socrates is probably one of history's most famous philosophers, more famous still for the manner of his death which left a great effect upon his student Plato, which in turn left writings that have a profound influence even today.
  2. Champion of the Force Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 27, 1999
    star 4
    ::bump::

    Not big on thread necromancy personally, but this was a good discussion - any chance of it continuing?
  3. DarthBoba Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 29, 2000
    star 9
    Rogue runs about half the interesting discussions on the Internet. I think that's all the explanation really needed. :p
  4. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    Well said! :p

    Gauls Attack Rome and Lay Siege to the Capitol
    Juno?s sacred geese alert Roman soldiers and avert a catastrophe
    July, 390 BCE

    <img src="http://www.livius.org/a/battlefields/allia/allia_map.gif">

    The Gauls invaded the area of Rome and attacked a couple of small Estruscan cities who called to Rome for aid. Rome sent ambassadors to meet with the Gallic ambassadors and, according to Livy, broke the sacred law of negotiation by actually killing the Gallic ambassadors. This enraged the Gauls and they marched on Rome, leading to the Battle of the Allia, named after the river near which much of the fighting took place. The battle was a disastrous rout for the Romans and as the Roman army retreated in disarray toward Rome, the Gauls followed.

    Most historians believe that Rome did not have much in the way of defenses at this period and the Roman army was extremely inefficient, with every soldier supplying his own weapons and not much in the way of training. According to legend, Juno?s sacred geese alerted those remaining in Rome to the disastrous defeat and the approaching army of the Gauls and many of the Romans were able to flee and barricade themselves in the Capitoline. The Gauls essentially sacked the rest of the city and set siege to the barricaded Romans. A message had been able to be sent, however, and soon reinforcements arrived in the form of Camillus and his army, which sent the Gauls off in hasty retreat.

    The battle was, it seems to me, essentially a draw; the Romans, despite having numerical superiority from the start, were pretty easy prey for the more warlike Gauls, but the siege wasn?t the Gauls? finest hour and by the time they withdrew, they had massive losses as well, both from the reinforcing army and from the plague.

    However, it was essentially this defeat that set the Romans on their path to domination. After the terrible defeat they suffered, they began building strong walls to the city and reformed the army. As so often happens, humiliating defeat lays the groundwork for extreme triumph. Rome has just entered the stage of major players; this is perfectly evident from the fact that Camillus was hailed as ?second Romulus.? For once, they had it right; Rome had been founded long before, but its days as a world power? They begin here, in the aftermath of destruction.

    Next time, we?ll talk a bit more about culture and education as a disciple of a great teacher makes a decision that changes the world forever.
  5. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    This is an interesting period in early Roman history.
  6. Champion of the Force Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 27, 1999
    star 4
    ::bump::

    Rogue, new update please. I want to find out who the 'disciple of a great teacher' is - the suspense is killing me. :p
  7. Lady_Sami_J_Kenobi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2002
    star 6
    Rogue,

    Please update. I am greatly interested in this thread.
    Champion of the Force likes this.
  8. Champion of the Force Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 27, 1999
    star 4
    bumpity bump bump

    I've sent @Rogue1-and-a-half a PM asking if he can update the thread. Hopefully he'll respond here soon. :)
  9. Kiki-Gonn Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 26, 2001
    star 6
    How have I never seen this thread?!
    WIERD_GREEN_MAN likes this.
  10. Champion of the Force Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 27, 1999
    star 4
    Probably because it's an old Senate thread that hasn't had an update in nearly a year.
  11. Kiki-Gonn Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 26, 2001
    star 6
    Yeah but I've been on the boards since '01
  12. Champion of the Force Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 27, 1999
    star 4
    ::shrugs:: Guess you weren't looking hard enough then. ;) :p

    @Rogue1-and-a-half got back to me - seems as though he no longer has the book (though one day hopes to buy it). :(
  13. Violent Violet Menace Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Aug 11, 2004
    star 4
    I thought this panel discussion was interesting. It's pretty recent. It's about the depiction of ancient history in cinema. It bases most of its discussion around the movie about Alexander the Great from 2004, but uses that as an example to address "sandal movies" in general.

    Last edited by Violent Violet Menace, Mar 15, 2013
  14. Lady_Sami_J_Kenobi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2002
    star 6
    Won't have time to watch that video, altho it does sound intriguing, but from my own study of Alexander the Great, I can say that Oliver Stone glossed over a lot of facts and fudged some others, so the movie was not really that historically accurate. If I had seen it in the theater, I would probably have been thrown out for yelling, "That didn't happen that way," "That's not the battle where that happened," etc.

    I read over 16 books on Alexander, btw.
    Violent Violet Menace likes this.