Amph 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die: Now Disc. "Heat" (1995)

Discussion in 'Community' started by Zaz, Feb 19, 2006.

  1. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "Muriel's Wedding" (1994)

    France/Australia 106 min.

    Director: P. J. Hogan

    Producer: Linda House et al.

    Screenplay: P. J. Hogan

    Photography: Martin McGrath

    Music: Peter Best

    Cast: Toni Collette, Rachel Griffiths

    RomCom with bitterness, according to the book.
  2. MariahJSkywalker Poopoo Head

    Member Since:
    Mar 11, 2005
    star 6
  3. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "The Kingdom" (1994)

    France/Denmark/Germany/Sweden 280 min.

    Director: Morton Arnfred, Lars von Trier

    Producer: Philippe Bober et al.

    Screenplay: Lars von Trior et al.

    Photography: Eric Kress

    Music: Joachim Holbek

    Cast: Ernst-Hugo Jaregard, Kirsten Rolffes

    A medical horror epic, originally a four-part TV miniseries.
  4. A Chorus of Disapproval New Films Riot Deterrent

    Manager
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    Aug 19, 2003
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    A restored print of this hits blu ray next month. And I, for one, cannot wait.
  5. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "Babe" (1995)

    Australia/USA 89 min.

    Director: Chris Noonan

    Producer: Bill & George Miller

    Screenplay: George Miller & Chris Noonan

    Photography: Andrew Lesnie

    Music: Nigel Westlake

    Cast: James Cromwell, Christine Cavanaugh

    The "Citizen Kane" of talking pig movies...
  6. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "Deseret" (1995)

    USA 92 min.

    Director: James Benning

    Producer: James Benning

    Screenplay: James Benning

    Photography: James Benning

    Music: N/A

    Cast: Fred Gardner (narrator)
  7. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "Braveheart" (1995)

    USA 177 min.

    Director: Mel Gibson

    Producer: Bruce Davey, Mel Gibson, Alan Ladd, Jr.

    Screenplay: Randall Wallace

    Photography: John Toll

    Music: James Horner

    Cast: Mel Gibson and a cast of thousands.

    Typical actor-directed epic. Leader. Lingering beauty shots (not of women). Gets theatrically beaten/disemboweled. Homo-erotic in too many ways to count. Historically ludricious. The battle scenes were directed by the second unit. Cheddarific.
  8. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

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    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5
    Nevertheless, James Horner's music for Braveheart is one of the greatest scores of the nineties.
  9. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Did it have bagpipes in it?

  10. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5
    It's got everythng in it but the kitchen sink. Including inappropriate instruments.
    Here's a great article on the score.

    Braveheart score review

    James Horner did four scores in 1995. Braveheart, Balto, Casper and Apollo 13. The profits on the Braveheart soundtrack are greater than Casper, Apollo 13 and Balto combined. It's a very popular score.
  11. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    Casper's better though. Score, not movie. :p

    I enjoy Braveheart. It's not accurate, it's occasionally silly. But undeniably moving.
  12. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    Death Wish in Scotland, attempting to be taken seriously. No thanks. Tried to watch some of it recently and decided I had more worthwhile things to do.
  13. Obey Wann Former RMFF CR & SW Region RSA

    Member Since:
    Jan 14, 2000
    star 6
    Ditto. I love watching it, and still listen to the soundtrack to this day. Good stuff!
  14. Darth McClain Arena Manager Emeritus

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    Feb 5, 2000
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    It is moving at times, but the inaccuracies just ruin parts of the story for me.
  15. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
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    It's dumber than dumb. :p

    (And yeah, I thought so before ole Mel muddied his copybook)
  16. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    I guess I've said this before plenty and to people who are bothered by historical inaccuracies, I guess it's not an effective argument. But . . . there are no historical inaccuracies in Braveheart. None. Zero. Because as the opening narration attests, the movie is openly trying to create a "myth" about William Wallace, not tell a true story about him. "History will call me a liar," the narrator says. The movie tells you flat out, "This is not a historical drama. This is a story of the kind that would have been told around the campfire about William Wallace." It's actually narrated by one of the characters, isn't it? Who explicitly says that he's not telling the truth? So, how can you ding a movie for historical inaccuracy in that case? It's the old dodge of blaming a movie for not being a completely different movie, instead of actually looking at the movie as it is. It's not like they set out to make an incredibly accurate film and failed; they set out to make a movie that was not at all accurate, but was inspiring and rousing. And they succeeded. My opinion.

    I suppose we've had this argument a hundred times in the Amp though.
  17. Darth McClain Arena Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Feb 5, 2000
    star 6
    Fair enough for a movie like Bravehart. I had forgotten about the opening narration of the movie.


    That said, I don't watch movies to learn history, I watch them to be entertained. But when my brain simply can't overlook glaring historical inaccuracies, it takes away from my enjoyment of the movie. I love history. I read non-"generalist" history fairly often for fun. It's probably a personal problem that I can't shut my brain off. :p
  18. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6

    Rogue, I have the greatest respect for you. But this is absolute ********. If this is a campfire story, change the damn names.
  19. timmoishere Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 2, 2007
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    What purpose would changing the names serve?. The story is ABOUT William Wallace. A similar technique was used in 300, with David Wenham's character narrating much of the story, and then at the end of the movie we see that the story is told as an inspiration to Sparta's troops as they prepare to battle the Persians and avenge Leonidas' death.

    By your logic, 300 shouldn't have been about Leonidas either. The movie should have opened with "Hey, remember our king Leonidas who died recently? Well, this is a story about a similar king, only his name is King Joe instead."
  20. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

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    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    What, mythology can never revolve around someone who existed?

    How bloody dreary.
  21. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    A first. Someone who believes in Zeus.
  22. Mastadge Manager Emeritus

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    Jun 4, 1999
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    Who said that? That real people can be the subject/basis of mythology does not imply that all myths are based on real people.
  23. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

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    Mar 3, 2005
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    Ignoring the Zeus comment which has nothing to do with what I said, if you're going to throw out narrative work featuring historical characters and situations due to a lack of fealty to cold, hard, facts, you can throw 99% of it out, and the 1% you'll be left with pretty much dry, dramatically inert crap, with some notable exceptions I'm sure.

    I really don't like Braveheart at all, but its problems as a motion picture have bugger all to do with how close it hews to the real life of William Wallace. Truth > fact, drama > trivia.
  24. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    This trivia is one of the keystones of the Scottish nationalist movement. Obviously they didn't listen to the introduction.

    I object the blackening of the name of England's greatest medieval king, as well.

    Your argument is that the truth doesn't matter. If it doesn't, why did they insist on using real people?
  25. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    No, my argument is that the truth is essential, but also that it is divorced from fact when dramatising history - the real names are the anchor to reality that can embed something that seems quite ludicrous in something real. I think that one of Braveheart's great flaws is that the English are hilariously diabolical and lack dimension, and that's why I think Spartacus is a far, far greater riff on the same theme, but again history is played with fast and loose so that a dramatically coherent point can be made that satisfies the viewer for their three hours of investment.

    The point of the film is not that the precise events occured, it is that an individual can choose to withstand the way things are and inspire change in the face of daunting and impossible odds, and to that end they will be lionized beyond their actual accomplishments.

    It is not the burden of dramatists to report historical fact, but why should they be banned from repurposing long-dead historical figures and by extension historical events to their own end? The living being spared I can understand, but artists are surely allowed to provide their own perspective and use real people in a dramatic format. Shakespeare turned Joan of Arc into a rampaging villainess, after all.