Amph "A Brave New World" - Aldous Huxley's Classic

Discussion in 'Archive: SF&F: Books and Comics' started by Alcareru, Apr 3, 2006.

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  1. Jabba-wocky Chosen One

    Member Since:
    May 4, 2003
    star 8
    I've always found BNW in particular, and the dystopian novels in general, to be rather poorly written. There are tremendously importatn things to be said in each one, granted. But they becoem so heavy as a "novel of ideas" that their actual structure as novels/stories really suffers. So I just felt the need to add in this oft neglected point. In terms of sheer craft, there's nothing particularly impressive about BNW.

    As for the book as a whole, I think I might like it least of all the dystopian novels. I may prefer it to Farenheit 451, however. That's because, while it's topic was also very important, in reading Bradbury's commentary on his inspiration, it seems to me that he was largely over-reacting, which kind of cheapens the value of the legitimate concerns he was conveying, in my mind.

    It's a clever novel, though. The true horror of a genetically pre-determined caste society isn't really hammered at explicitly in great depth. By contrast, I think 1984 went much more out of its way to make sure that you felt revulsion at the system being portrayed their. So I do appreciate that about it.
  2. OBI-BEN-KENOBI Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 13, 2004
    star 6
    Haven't yet read it, but it's required reading for my class on utopias next semester.
  3. The_Eye_of_Strilo Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 27, 2003
    star 2
    Interesting class. Tell us more about it when it comes.
  4. Laine_Snowtrekker Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 8, 2003
    star 5
    I can believe that I said it. It is one the best endings I've ever read, but that doesn't mean that I had to like how it ended. I think there's a difference between it being well-written and well-fitting to the story preceding it, and it being what I hoped for the characters.

    Plus, I was a sixth-grader when I first read BNW and 1984. Maybe that plays into it. And every time I read it since, I still haven't enjoyed reading what happened to the characters. It was thoroughly horrifying, and something inside of me rebelled at the thought that life could ever be like that. To me, one of the definitions of a dystopic society is that the bad guys win. And me, well, I don't like it when evil wins. Chalk it up to being a Romanticist (or so my high school English teacher said).
  5. Strilo Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Aug 6, 2001
    star 8
    That's fair enough. But you are right. The endings are very well written and fit the story they are telling.
  6. sidious618 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 20, 2003
    star 6
    It was okay but the last page was fantasitc.
  7. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Jul 20, 2002
    star 9
    I got 80 pages in and it was so horrible that I had to stop. Got a laugh about the "Our Ford" but the children's games . . . no. Unfortunately, it's probably going to be required for me next year [face_plain]
  8. Strilo Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Aug 6, 2001
    star 8
    To to read it with as open a mind as you can. It really is an amazing book.
  9. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Jul 20, 2002
    star 9
    I did--I knew before I started that Huxley's position was that pleasure influences humans more than anything (contrary to Orwell, who thought it was fear). But the games the kids played was over the top (and it was really boring :p
  10. Strilo Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Aug 6, 2001
    star 8
    But kids DO play sex games. I did. Others do. Like playing "doctor" and stuff. It's commonly known and done, but it's some dirty covert thing no one talks about. Huxley just turned it into something open and encouraged.
  11. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Jul 20, 2002
    star 9
    Really? I wouldn't consider playing doctor a sex game.
  12. sidious618 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 20, 2003
    star 6
    You're absolutely right. It's amazing that he got away with it back then, too.
  13. Strilo Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Aug 6, 2001
    star 8
    Depends on how it is played. But really, child development stuff will authenticate what Huxley is talking about. Kids play sex games. The process of understanding sexuality does not start with puberty.
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