Lit A Bright Center: The Official Core Worlds Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Literature' started by AdmiralNick22, Jan 4, 2013.

  1. Gorefiend Chosen One

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    Because that is what’s been mentioned as happening in the GFFA?
  2. King of Alsakan Force Ghost

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    I thought about that too, maybe the SW galaxy is just an anomaly in that respect. Though at the pace we seem to be finding planets in the Milky Way you never know, maybe there could be more potentially habitable worlds closer to our galactic core than was originally thought possible.
  3. Adrian the Cool Jedi Master

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    Milky Way has relatively few sentient species evolved here and many world have been terra-formed/katrijshon-formed/jania-formed. The most numerours species, the Katrijshoni (12% of population), are from the edge of the galactic bulge, from a world called Katrijshon. Janians live in this galaxy, too (7% of population) and settled Earth, but they're from another galaxy. If you don't belief me this:

    Real science "knows" only a little bit about habitable planets, yet. Guesses of possible amounts of inhabitable worlds range from only a single one, to 50-200 million and up 'til 10 billion.

    Centrifugal forces prevent stars from falling into the black hole, or it would consume the entire galaxy within time. Even if it would do this (but it doesn't), then not in a "few" million years. Rotating around the galactic center takes Sol 220 million years for one time, as an example. Milky Way is 13 billion years old and will continue to exist a lot of time longer.
    Last edited by Adrian the Cool, Feb 15, 2013
  4. Gorefiend Chosen One

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    Stuff is continually falling into Sagittarius A (Gas clouds for example and other Black Holes in the center of galaxies have been absorved consuming suns) and eventually it is predicted to indeed swallow the whole Milky Way (though yes it will take forever), along with Andromeda for that matter which is supposed to collide with the Milky Way in a few billion years.
    Last edited by Gorefiend, Feb 15, 2013
  5. AdmiralNick22 Fleet Admiral of Literature

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    In Star Wars #2, one of the Rebel pilots in Leia's stealth squadron, Falback Kord, is an Imperial defector from the Core World of Tinnel IV. I had to pull out my copy of the Atlas to find it, but it is in the M-12 coordinate of the Core, on the Corellian Run. Nice to see this Core World used, cause as far as the Wook is concerned the only thing of note about the world is that Moff Jerjerrod had an estate there. Given it's proximity to Corellia, I wonder if this world was originally a Corellian colony?

    --Adm. Nick
  6. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    Hey Nick,

    Was reading the Book of Sith today. Page 75 -- Shawken, Core Founder, is a monarchy. Hah!
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  7. blackmyron Force Ghost

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    It does imply that the monarchy was a thing in the past, though, at the time of the writing.

    Last edited by blackmyron, Feb 16, 2013
  8. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    It was pure hilarious coincidence. I just opened up that page (being where I left off) and Shawken was the first thing to catch my eye.

    I don't know that the implication is that the monarchy is gone by Bane, it could also be that Shawken's power waned as well.
  9. blackmyron Force Ghost

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    True, taken literally it looks like Shawken's loss of power was significant enough to be a metaphor - the mocking reference to "kings" might indicate the rulers still call themselves such despite having lost the power and influence they once had.
  10. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    So relevant, in a way: the Lords of the Expanse. Some materials (e.g., the Grant segment of Who's Who) suggest that Tapani regard themselves as the highest sort of aristocrats, and that someone like Grant would regard himself as above even the rest of the grand admirals (at least one of whom was a Core World aristocrat -- Teshik -- and another was an extremely highly placed Court player, Tigellinus). Other materials (e.g., Galaxy of Intrigue) suggest that the Tapani are lesser nobility, like the Tagges or the Senex lords, and are looked down upon by the Core Worlders.

    Which is it? I plan on perusing the WEG materials to see what the original take was, because I sort of feel like WEG took a middle approach that leaned more towards the former than the latter. My memory is too hazy though.
  11. King of Alsakan Force Ghost

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    I caught that glorious fact as well, the more monarchies the better, though nick pointed out that they mentioned setting up a democratic government in the Marvel comics once the Empire was defeated

    It seems to me most Core Worlds had some aristocratic flavor to their governments, and it usually persisted for the majority of the Old Republic timeline
  12. Gorefiend Chosen One

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    Could be both, they themselves consider themselves True Nobles, the ones from the actual Core World don't see it that way.
  13. AdmiralNick22 Fleet Admiral of Literature

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    Yeah, there is no reason that Shawken can't have been a monarchy in the past and demcoractic in the modern setting, per the Marvel issue. It is also entirely possible that Shawken could be like Esseles, which once ruled an empire and had a monarchy only to over time transition into a constitutional monarchy like modern Great Britain. As far as "loss of power", Shawken does strike me as one of the Core Worlds that saw their infulence shrink in the last millenia of the Republic, as other Core Worlds became even more dominant. In that particular area of the Core, it is rather crowded with "big" worlds, so there are bound to be worlds that simply get outpaced and out played by their neighbors.

    --Adm. Nick
  14. King of Alsakan Force Ghost

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    Maybe all of the Core Worlds who lost their monarchs during the Rise of the Empire era will regain their thrones in Episode VII in an effort to stabilize the current galactic government;)
  15. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    Yeah actually from rereading Lords of the Expanse it's the same then too. WEG says that Core Worlders regard Tapani as backwater provincials, which backs up ToG saying that they don't regard them as anywhere near their equals.

    Tapani still feel superior to everybody, says ToG. So yeah it looks like its both. But it's more a case of the Tapani being insular and sheltered. So Grant's tale is even sadder; he was just a hick.


    ToG also paints the Tagges as a line of criminals. Don't we have a source calling them Core Founders? Or am I just mixing them up with the Prajis?

    @AdmiralNick22, what does Marvel say exactly? It could be like Mon Cola where they overthrew their traditional government when they joined the revolutionaries.
  16. blackmyron Force Ghost

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    Essential Atlas stated that Tepasi was one of the founding worlds of the Republic, but not specifically the House of Tagge.
  17. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    Ahhh, okay. Hah! So then the Tagges really are just a bunch of lowlifes, then. Love it.
  18. King of Alsakan Force Ghost

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    pretty funny, don't know if there are anymore details from the comic, but this was the gist of it:

  19. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    Man, re-reading Into the Core -- I didn't realize that Chandrila was a direct democracy. So not only is it a world of trouble makers, not only is it agrarian, but it's a pure democracy too? What is this, some sort of Jeffersonian hell? No wonder I detest Mothma and everything for which she stands!
  20. Grade Jedi Master

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    Jan 17, 2013
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    Here is an exercise for you. What if JJ Abrams in the new movie would do to Coruscant what he did to Vulcan in Star Trek.

    How that would effect the political and miliatry plan of the Core Worlds and also the galaxy at large?
  21. The Loyal Imperial Manager Emeritus

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    You didn't know?

    Next you're going to tell me you didn't know they use PRC-style population control.
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  22. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    ....


    ....


    It's like these people are born bad. What's wrong with these Rebels?
  23. The Loyal Imperial Manager Emeritus

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    They have an extensive system of political indoctrination that starts at birth. Really.
  24. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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  25. The Loyal Imperial Manager Emeritus

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    They may have a democratic society, but it also seems carefully designed to turn out a very specific kind of Chandrilan.