A Cry For Help: George H.W. Bush Quote Needed

Discussion in 'Archive: The Senate Floor' started by thegreatyoda, Mar 10, 2005.

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  1. thegreatyoda Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 10, 2001
    star 4
    While this is tecnically not a debatable subject it deals with politics so I thought this would be the best place to ask.

    I am doing a report on the Conservative policies concerning Iraq and I am in need of a specific quote.

    In Bush's autobiography he states that the reason he did not push further into Baghdad during Desert Storm was because he feared it woul cause a prolonged conflict that would destabilize the reigion. I do not have the actual book (I first read the quote in Newsweek a while back, the one copy in my college library is checked out, and I have yet to find the magic phrase that will give me results on google.

    If any of you have the book (or posess a higher level of skill when it comes to Google searches) I would be most greatful if you would post the exact quote here.

    Mods, if this thread is dissruptive feel free to lock it. However, it would be a great help to my grade if you would leave it open long enough for me to find the quote.

    Thanks.

    KK EDIT: Question answered + not much of a topic for discussion = locked thread
  2. Ender Sai Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 18, 2001
    star 9
    ...to eliminate Saddam, extending the ground war into an occupation of Iraq, would have violated our guideline about not changing objectives in midstream, engaging in "mission creep," and would have incurred incalculable human and political costs. Apprehending him was probably impossible. We had been unable to find Noriega in Panama, which we knew intimately. We would have been forced to occupy Baghdad and, in effect, rule Iraq. The coalition would instantly have collapsed, the Arabs deserting it in anger and other allies pulling out as well. Under the circumstances, there was no viable "exit strategy" we could see, violating another of our principles. Furthermore, we had been self-consciously trying to set a pattern for handling aggression in the post-Cold War world. Going in and occupying Iraq, thus unilaterally exceeding the United Nations' mandate, would have destroyed the precedent of international response to aggression that we hoped to establish. Had we gone the invasion route, the United States could conceivably still be an occupying power in a bitterly hostile land. It would have been a dramatically different, and perhaps barren, outcome.


    George HW Bush and Brent Scowcroft, A World Transformed, Chapter 19.

    Seems he was right.

    E_S
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