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Lit A look at Pirates and Privateers & Wanted by Cracken w/ Charlemagne19

Discussion in 'Literature' started by Charlemagne19, Jul 11, 2018 at 4:29 AM.

  1. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2000
    West End Games provided a lot of authors a "Story Bible" so to speak of collected ship names, stats, characters, and concepts for flavoring their universe. Certainly, it helped everyone from Timothy Zahn to Michael Stackpole in expanding the universe. Not to mention thousands of tabletop roleplaying gamemasters in creating their universe.

    I had a lot of fun examining the in's and out's of GALAXY GUIDE 9: FRAGMENTS FROM THE RIM. I also take great inspiration from @Havac and @GrandAdmiralJello in their Adventure Journal discussion. Here, I'm going to discuss TWO different books because one is full of flavor but not so much universe information and another is full of interesting rogues.

    [​IMG]

    And

    [​IMG]

    As if it needed to be explained Pirates and Privateers were an analysis of how piracy works in the GFFA while Wanted by Cracken provides about 40 criminals which the New Republic captured.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018 at 4:31 AM
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  2. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2000
    PIRATES AND PRIVATEERS PART 1

    [​IMG]

    The introduction to this book basically starts us off with this flavor text and we're going to spend the majority of our time in this book discussing the uneasy relationship between the Rebel Alliance and their core of privateers.

    The above conversation nicely fits with the fact that I think @GrandAdmiralJello would enjoy that the Mon Calamari are a people who are basically the British Empire in the fact they are a maritime people (no duh) who have adapted those qualities to space. They hate smugglers, pirates, and are very much proud of their traditions that are very much built on hating smugglers as well as pirates. I was pleased when these elements were brought over to canon by the comics with Han Solo being treated like garbage by Ackbar.

    It's no surprise Mon Mothma is both leery of the concept of allying with pirates while also being more pragmatic than Admiral Ackbar. I feel Minister Ral'Rai Muvunc is a poor choice for the "third guy in all of this" because while he's nicely snarky, I don't know if he's ever brought up again and I think someone else would have been better to argue for privateering. Borsk Fey'lya, an early Bel Iblis, or even Princess Leia would have been a better choice IMHO.

    Speaking of which, I'd have been very interested to get Leia's opinion on the subject. I'm inclined to think she would be more willing to bend than Mon Mothma but also very clear about the strictures which privateers for the Alliance would be willing to follow. After all, she is prone to loggerheads about dealing with criminals but also very much a friend to a certain one in the Rebellion.

    The book gives a nice distinction between pirates and privateers for the laymen in the series. A pirate is a figure who is an independent starship bandit who robs and plunders across the starlanes. A privateer, by contrast, is exactly the same but has permission to do so of a government. The book is very clearly geared to having the player characters be pirates for the Rebellion as we see in the recent SOLO movie. We get the statement that piracy flourishes in times of war but this is before the KOTOR and Legacy era so it will only be about the Galactic Civil War.

    "The only rules that really matter are these: what a man can do and what a man can’t do. For instance, you can accept that your father was a pirate and a good man or you can’t. But pirate is in your blood, boy, so you’ll have to square with that some day."

    -Jack Sparrow, Pirates of the Caribbean (duh)

    The book basically states via example that being a privateer for the Rebellion is a chance to be a rebel among the rebels. FRAGMENTS FROM THE RIM indicated that groups like the Laramus Base Irregulars and other Wraith Squadron-esque misfits tend to be better for PCs than straight examples of people in the military hierarchy. The book begins by giving us a history of privateering in the Rebellion that turns out to have been a lot more checkered than people thought.

    The story begins by the fact the Imperial Navy had managed to score some decent credibility in the eyes of the Republic from the Clone Wars period to the year 0 A.B.Y. by exterminating piracy in the galaxy, driving it from the main hyperlanes and onto secondary routes before devoting its attention full-time to the Rebellion. It's mentioned, before the Rebellion existed, that pirates were usually how the Imperial war machine justified itself despite the fact your average Victory Star Destroyer could destroy the largest fleets. The Baativ Pirates (which FRAGMENTS FROM THE RIM covered) are used as an example of an infamous Imperial victory.

    The Rebellion started off in extreme need of ships, funding, provisions, and more which they found out they could not supply. Ral'Rai Muvunc then proceeded to note that privateering might be a solution because:

    [​IMG]

    The result of this experiment?

    IT WAS A COMPLETE DISASTER.


    In one of the more clever bits from this book, they mention this is actually the SECOND time the Rebellion has attempted to use privateers en masse. The first time resulted in the privateers being restricted to Imperial military resupply, Alliance observers attempting to give the privateers commands (treating them as below any "real" Rebel officers), giving them last priority in any repairs, taking a HUGE chunk of their pay, and even outright sabotage or shoddy work of said repairs. The Rebellion, which did receive a big boost from it, found themselves seriously karked by the results. Many sympathetic criminals (i.e. Han Solo types) who were fully ready and willing to assist the Rebellion quickly spread the word throughout the Galactic Underworld the Alliance was not to be trusted.

    I'm getting shades of Bria Tharen here. In any case, the Alliance's problems grew more and more problematic as their lack of access to smugglers as well as privateers left them in severe financial straights. Which is why they've begun a SECOND phase of their privateering campaign with the following changes:

    * Privateers can strike at any Imperial supplies be they corporate or private.
    * They've increased the percentage which privateers can keep of their loot by a significant amount.
    * Privateers were given equal validity to Rebel Alliance assets in repair outside of critical missions.
    * Alliance observers were stripped of command privilege. This last one caught Alliance Intelligence by surprise because it was done by the Alliance Navy. The only thing they apparently hate more than pirates is the idea of non-sailors screwing with the chain of command.

    This compromise was too little too late until Nebulon-B frigate Far Orbit and its commander struck out at the Core Worlds and looted numerous starships there, taking back a vast haul to the alliance of 120,000 tons of goods. Which sounds like a lot but it turns out the results were not measured in goods but the fact the Imperial fleet redeployed itself for six months and the resulting wasted effort actually cost the Empire a sector fleet's worth of production material. In effect, privateers had "defeated" the Empire in one of the Alliance's biggest victories through simply causing them humiliation.

    The Far Orbit's actions also have lured a decent number of privateers to the Alliance and their criminal ties are improving. Ironically, this has just made the hardliners against them in the Alliance EVEN MORE set on ending the experiment. Ordinance and Supply is now their only defenders aside from Mon Mothma herself (and she is tepidly supportive) with the latter now considered by many to be barely above criminals themselves. Only time will tell if the second attempt at privateering will last.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018 at 6:39 AM
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  3. blackmyron

    blackmyron Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 29, 2005
    I don't think you can discuss Pirates and Privateers without talking about the Far Orbit Project - sort of the application of the concepts brought up in the former.
     
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  4. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

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    Jul 30, 2000
    I've gotten a copy of that as well, though I confess I wasn't a big fan of the more plot-heavy adventures by West End Games like it and Darkstryder. Neither left much room to be incorporated into existing campaigns.

    If people want me to cover it as well in this thread, I certainly will.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018 at 6:58 AM
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  5. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Pirates and Privateers part 2

    It occurs to me some background for this book might be necessary and I started a little too quickly. This book is by Timothy O'Brian who is a guy who managed to carve out his own little chunk of the Star Wars Legend canon before the end.

    http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Timothy_S._O'Brien

    Timothy isn't someone I know personally but I can tell you something: this dude really loved pirates. Not only did he write this book but he did his absolute best to expand the material of it on multiple occasions. He's also the guy who created the Gree.

    Timothy originally created the idea of Rebel Privateers in Star Wars Adventure Journal 2# and at some point I'm going to have to contact @Havac and go try to find his opinion on that article on the Jello Adventure Journal thread. If you don't own a copy of that book then you should check out The Best of Star Wars Adventure Journal, Issues 1-4.

    The article summarizes a lot of what Pirates and Privateers will cover in more detail. Basically, the Rebellion doesn't really have a great relationship with privateers but makes use of them.

    http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Rebel_Privateers!

    He also wrote the Far orbit Project which is the story of the Far Orbit and a mini-campaign where the player characters eventually manage to steal one of Palpatine's Treasure Ships heading to Wayland.

    Or, at least that's where it was heading in my game.

    BTW, Pirates have always had a fairly huge role in Star Wars' EU if not the movies themselves. A short list of the ones we know are:

    * Crimson Jack: http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Crimson_Jack
    * Finhead Stonebone: http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Finhead_Stonebone
    * Celia Durasha: http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Celia_Durasha
    * Han Solo (who is a dabbler more than a professional)
    * Prince Isodor (briefly)
    * Celis Mott: http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Celis_Mott
    * Admiral Tavira and her gangs
    * Hondo
     
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  6. DarthJaceus

    DarthJaceus Jedi Padawan

    Registered:
    Dec 6, 2016
    It would be great if you could incorporate The Far Orbit Project without distracting too much from the other too. Also, thanks for covering this topic! The concept behind privateers aiding the alliance is awesome, and makes sense when you think about how "guerrilla" the alliance was operating. Pirates and Privateers and Wanted by Cracken are two of my favorite sourcebooks, ones I feel are quite overlooked at time. Awesome thread, I'll be tuned in for sure!
     
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  7. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Pirates and Privateers Part 3

    The next part of the book and the end of Chapter 1 is the discussion of Letters of Marque as well as what that means plus some basic elements of how being a privateer works. It's fairly straight forward and basically is a "license to pirate" from the Rebellion. It has the Rebellion willing to pay 50% of the cargo's value (which is more than I expected) and paying bounties for Imperial prisoners.

    A couple of things which are notable is the fact the Alliance frees all slaves found on ships taken (no surprise there) but also the destruction of "all illicit substances." This doesn't really fit with Bria Tharen taking a huge amount of drugs to fund the Allinace in the Han Solo Trilogy but I always felt like that was going to get Mon Mothma and Leia up in arms when they found out. I feel like the Alliance, for all of Rogue One saying they did do nasty things, wasn't the kind of group which was going to get involved in narco-revolution.

    [​IMG]

    The supplement tries a little too hard to explain all of this since it's fairly straight forward. It does, however, also explain that every Rebel privateer is hooked up to a specially encrypted Rebel Alliance transmission system that allows them to send messages to Rebel High Command and receive orders in return. This allows them to be directed to Rebel bases and keep in communication--which is a nice bit of Rebel information. We also get the Rebel Observer who is basically a Rebel agent assigned to make sure the pirates aren't misbehaving.

    Code: Quasar is basically the all-purpose pass code for the Rebellion that is updated regularly but identifies a Rebel privateer as "friendly" to the Alliance. The possibility of a Rebel Alliance privateer vessel showing up and not being known to a fleet is something I'm wondering about because you'd think they'd all be somewhere in a databank.

    There's a short story about one being assigned to a Nebulon-B frigate.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Man, the tension is just not getting any better with the Alliance and their criminal allies despite being on the same side.

    One thing they don't mention which disappointments me is the Black Code which is something hilarious in the original Adventure Journal article. Basically, it's a "secret" BOSS code (which is the all-purpose Starship Registration of the Galaxy). You turn it on and your ship projects a scary pirate logo to the ship's you're approaching and they can't identify you as anything else.

    In effect, yes, the Pirate Flag equivalent of the Star Wars galaxy.

    Next up - THE FAR ORBIT PROJECT!
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018 at 6:25 PM
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  8. DarthJaceus

    DarthJaceus Jedi Padawan

    Registered:
    Dec 6, 2016
    Yay! Far Orbit Project! I have to say, I do enjoy the banter bewteen Xhaxin and his rebel liaison. Also, once again, thank you for this read-through. I'm just getting back into the WEG books and I'm happy to see them get the love they deserve.
     
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  9. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2000
    PIRATES AND PRIVATEERS part 4

    THE FAR ORBIT PROJECT


    West End Games did an amazing job with hundreds of supplements that dramatically increased the background for the Star Wars EU. However, all good things must come to an end. Ironically, in an age when every tabletop business including Dungeons and Dragons were going out of business--WEG was going strong under the Star Wars license. It was only due to its CEO shuffling money from it to prop up another failing company that wiped it out. Thus, the Star Wars license went to Wizards of the Coast and the company folded soon after.

    The last supplement for West End Games was The Far Orbit Project which was part of a last ditch effort to revive interest in the failing Star Wars line (which wasn't actually failing). Previously, there was the Darkstryder campaign and both of them were part of an idea to create (essentially) movies for the players to enjoy.

    [​IMG]

    The DARKSTRYDER campaign was hit and miss, to be honest. The problem was the game was not actually based on Star Wars. The premise was the PCs were headed into the Unknown Regions (yes, them again) on a mission to capture a fleeing Moth before he used the OMNIPOTENT POWER of the Darkstryder technology to conquer the galaxy. The PCs were part of the crew or could take over the pregenerated characters as they did a variety of low level adventures until they stopped Moff Sarn.

    The problems with the Darkstryder Project are as follows:

    * It was Star Trek, not Star Wars. Specifically, it was based on Star Trek: Voyager which was going on at the time and no one was a big fan there.
    * The PCs had to answer to someone else not their own characters.
    * The PCs if original didn't have much room to interact with the characters who had pre-planned arcs which didn't incorporate them going off the rails LIKE PCS ALWAYS DO.
    * Corellian Corvettes aren't cool ships. They are the opposite of cool, in fact.
    * They couldn't even make the bad guy a Grand Moff?
    * There wasn't a lot of room to do much of your own gaming.
    * No connection to Jedi, The Force, or the Sith save the Imperial woman dressed like the Black Widow on the cover.
    * Tonally, the game had no interest in being swasbuckling heroics or WW2 in Space.
    * It was expensive and used a lot of miniatures and tiny cards which were not really necessary.

    [​IMG]

    The FAR ORBIT PROJECT is, by contrast, a lot better of an idea. It wasn't a boxed set, for one, but a single supplement which gave you everything you needed to run a campaign included in the game but had ample room to expand on the initial ideas. It was heavily connected to PIRATES AND PRIVATEERS (which we've only covered one chapter of but I'm an anarchic disordered mind ala Joruus C'boath) but not so much you needed it to run.

    The premise is simple: The Far Orbit is an Imperial Nebulon-B frigate with a mission to suppress piracy in the Outer Rim territory. Its captain Vocis Kenit is an abusive, arrogant, awful Imperial who throws his men's lives away for fleeting glory. After getting his TIE pilot brother killed, 1st officer Dhas Fenoep Vedij (what is with these names?), gathers together a mutiny then defects to the Alliance.

    [​IMG]

    Can you tell this guy is the bad guy?

    [​IMG]

    Sate Pestage gives Vocis Kenit a second chance to avoid being executed and puts him in charge of a small fleet to hunt down and destroy the Far Orbit. The Far Orbit's new captain meanwhile offers the Rebellion a deal: they will go into the Core Worlds and loot the ships there for vast wealth to fuel the Alliance's war machine in exchange for a hefty cut of the profits. There's a ticking timer here as eventually the Empire will clue in and they will be forced to flee back into the Outer Rim.

    It's pretty much original Battlestar Galactica to Darkstryder's Star Trek but different enough that it works. The PCs have to constantly move and loot enough ships to make themselves a profit without degenerating into bad guy behavior or getting the Empire on their back. They also have to avoid Vocis Kenit's traps. They also have more enemies than they expect as ex-pirate hunters, they are loathed by a number of gangs already operating in the Core.

    The campaign consists of six short adventures but is something that climaxes in the discovery of an Imperial Treasure Ship (Star Galleon) that contains 100,000 tons of treasure. The book says you can make it even bigger with it possibly being something carrying relics to Wayland. Vocis' screw up gets him executed by Palpatine himself and the resulting redeployment of the fleet is enough to mess up the Empire's reputation and bring massive publicity to the Rebellion.

    The campaign consists of six short adventures but is something that climaxes in the discovery of an Imperial Treasure Ship (Star Galleon) that contains 100,000 tons of treasure. The book says you can make it even bigger with it possibly being something carrying relics to Wayland. The Alliance Observer is also a hardnosed Marine who loathes the crew for being A:] Ex-Imperials. B:] Criminals they recruited from a shadowport.

    The adventures aren't great but they're not bad, either, involving tales of revenge and practicalities like refueling. The PCs can potentially destroy a small Imperial fleet which has the result of "winning" early but also getting the Underworld to turn against them as they're too "hot" now.

    Ways I'd modify the FAR ORBIT PROJECT

    1. The campaign would start with the Mutiny itself and the PCs would either be the Mutineers or they would be captured in the hold. It would also be after a disastrous battle which the captain showed himself to be completely incompetant and almost got them all killed. Worse, he was going to blame the 1st officer and his crew for it in order to protect himself. The PCs can turn what is going to be a complete failure (the Captain and the Stormtroopers prepared to kill everyone) into a rousing success.

    2. The PCs would be hunted by High Inquisitor Tremayne and Captain Kenit on the Inquisitor rather than just having it be Kenit. How did Kenit get a promotion from being a failed captain to being head of an Imperial ISD? He's not. Captain Kenit is actually Vocis' older brother and the former was required to execute the latter for his incompetence. Kenit has been driven insane by it and has diverted the blame to the PCs.
    Basically, an homage to FARSCAPE.

    3. Vedij will be murdered by a attractive female ISB agent at some point while at port and replaced with a surgically altered male ISB agent (or maybe "she" is a Changeling). His mission will not be to stop the ship but actually just turn it into an actual pirate ship and full of atrocities. The PCs will have to mount their own mutiny and replace him.

    4. The Star Galleon is sent for Wayland after all. That's why it was so lightly guarded and also has Inquisitor Tremayne onboard for an epic duel in his replica of the Emperor's throne room.

    The wealth onboard is enough to bribe the Corporate Sector Authority to turn over 3 Sector Fleets to the Rebellion and give them the sudden push necessary to take the Outer Rim in the months following Endor, which results in many more Imperials defecting en masse.

    The Far Orbit's legend being an inspiration to overworked and underpaid Imperials everywhere.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018 at 2:34 PM
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  10. DarthJaceus

    DarthJaceus Jedi Padawan

    Registered:
    Dec 6, 2016
    You know, the DarkStryder Campaign might have made a decent novel! I appreciate what they were going for and my all-encompassing love for Star Wars keeps it in my collection, but honestly, like you said, absolutely no freedom for players (without it being a pain)

    I appreciate the idea, but it doesn't work for a role-playing game, would've been a better book or comic
     
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  11. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Oops, there's a double sentence in my post above. Any mods willing to help with that?

    @Havac?
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018 at 5:54 PM
  12. blackmyron

    blackmyron Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 29, 2005
    Far Orbit Project also heavily used the SWAJ article on the Ringali Shell sectors, making it unique in having a Core Worlds setting for the campaign.
     
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  13. Landb

    Landb Jedi Padawan star 1

    Registered:
    Mar 7, 2017
    I know this wasn't meant to be a complete list, but any list of Star Wars pirates is diminished if it doesn't include the closest thing the franchise has to Jack Sparrow. Reginald Barkbone, Scourge of the Seven Sectors, a flamboyant Star Galleon-flying alien pirate so utterly infuriating that he gained the personal hatred of not one but two Grand Admirals and inspired the creation of an entire branch of the Bounty Hunter's Guild.
     
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  14. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

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    Jul 30, 2000
    The Core World adventure journal was one of my favorite of them. I also feel setting this adventure in the Core Worlds made the events feel more important because the player characters are pretty much the ONLY rebel operatives in that region.
     
  15. Duguay

    Duguay Jedi Master star 2

    Registered:
    Nov 30, 2002
    I love all those suppliments, even if they have problems as well thought out for the SW game. Particularly Darkstryder, which I just enjoyed reading through; I agree with DarthJaceus that it might be fun to see in novel form. As far as railroading goes, I played with it in my head as I ran through it and changes to make things interesting in accordance with my liking suggested themselves. There's one adventure, I think called Little Empires, where the ship is impounded and the crew separated and dispersed to a bunch of different locations; I enjoyed the suggested aftermath were the crew reassembles and imagined that as a more vast undertaking. One possibility is they don't get their Corellian Corvette back, but reassemble on 2-3 other ships. It makes it hard to run sabotage programs the main villain has laying in wait within their ship's computer system, but those can be re-jigged (or not). Some potential is lost from later adventures, but the material written is still there to inspire a GM. That's my experience, though, I found a lot of fun in going over the material and speculating about the ways it could be cannibalized to make it more interesting for myself and potential players, just as a mental creativity exercise.

    Note too, that I even played with the idea of ditching the Corellian Corvette. However, the corvette isn't cool!? More so, the opposite of cool? I liked the material covering the ships status and capabilities, as an inside look on a heavily modified variant of the first ship we ever see in the SW movies. Don't get me wrong, any given ship in the movies is fair game as something that doesn't work for another person, I understand. You're not keen on the look?

    I'm enjoying your write-up for this stuff, though, even for the Darkstryder campaign. I like the Pirates and Privateers suppliments.
     
  16. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Re: The Coolness of the Corellian Corvette

    One of the things which I've always liked about Star Wars is the fact that it plays heavily with scale. The Corellian Corvette is a wonderfully fascinating ship we get to see but it's actually build-up for the seconds later reveal of the much-much larger IMPERIAL STAR DESTROYER which is huge on screen--especially close up.

    A thing I've always struggled with in West End Games is the game really doesn't want you to playing with the Big Boys and it got annoying more than once. Darth Vader and Palpatine are stated so that any encounter with them might as well be you attacking the Sun. At the rate of experience gained, you could never gain enough Exp to kill either.

    Why High Inquisitor Tremayne exists as Vader-Lite. Similarly, Jodo Kast was created so player characters could fight Boba Fett except not really.

    WOTC did a much better job by making Darth Vader 18th level and restricting Palpatine to 20th level. Both of them remain the biggest badasses in the universe but they're actually things you could theoretically defeat in your campaign. Indeed, there was a "Road to 20th level" campaign which allowed the player characters to blow up the prototype for the Executor.

    I feel like Darkstryder suffered for the fact you got the absolute SMALLEST and weakest ship in the Rebellion that just made you feel like you were irrelevant. WOTC also screwed up because they ran a contest called "What's His Story?" where they pointed to one of the nameless mooks in a still of Star Wars. Versus, you know, Luke and Han and Leia. The people you want to tell similar stories to.

    I feel like the game could benefit from avoiding the constant attempts to dial down the heroics of the PCs. One of my all-time favorite adventures for WEST END GAMES is Starfall where you have to escape a Victory Star Destroyer on the verge of self-destructing. Even then, I had to wonder, "Why a Victory Star Destroyer?" Well, it turned out people were iffy about giving the players even a taste of an Imperial Star Destroyer.

    [​IMG]

    Other adventures had you do small-time stuff like protecting Mon Calamari mines, blowing up Imperial factories, and so on. It's why Crisis on Cloud City was so great because that adventure was straight up, "Rescue Cloud City from Skynet."
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018 at 9:19 AM
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  17. Duguay

    Duguay Jedi Master star 2

    Registered:
    Nov 30, 2002
    Interesting, that makes sense. Thanks for explaining the rationale regarding the corvette I confess, maybe I'm a weird one, I like the idea of scaling things down for characters in the game, or using villains that are similar but different from those seen in the movies (the Inquisitor does seem like an interesting character but I agree Jodo Kast is just way too on-the-nose as a cut-rate Boba Fett). I'm reading through the 1st edition rules for the first time (thanks to the anniversary re-release) and even though the game emphasizes setting within the original trilogy, I kind of like Brian Daley's innovation of the galaxy having many different corners that characters can make a difference in.

    I had one other question I forgot to ask, I'm dabbling a bit in exploring the Adventure Journals, and you allude to a discussion about those...? I tried looking that up but search skills are lacking, can you point me in the right direction?
     
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  18. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

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    Jul 30, 2000
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  19. Voltron64

    Voltron64 Jedi Master star 1

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    Dec 23, 2009
    I personally am okay with being on a lower scale than the movie characters as well as being on an even level with them.

    Like you once said, there has to be tens of thousands of Rebel heroes who are hitting the Empire left and right.

    Who is to say these aren't their stories?

    Like your force-sensitive PCs probably may not be the First of the New Jedi, but nothing says they can't be the Second or Third.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018 at 12:35 PM
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  20. Charlemagne19

    Charlemagne19 Chosen One star 8

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    Jul 30, 2000
    It depends what your players want.

    I tend to prefer characters who are their own legends.

    But ONTO THE NEXT PART!
     
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  21. Voltron64

    Voltron64 Jedi Master star 1

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    Dec 23, 2009
    What's to say they aren't even with the material provided?
     
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