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Amph America's most banned books. 1 - Huh?

Discussion in 'Archive: The Amphitheatre' started by halibut, Apr 13, 2009.

  1. Darth McClain

    Darth McClain Manager Emeritus star 6 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Feb 5, 2000
    I think we read this book in elementary school...it sounds really familiar.
     
  2. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    Haven't read that one.
     
  3. Rogue1-and-a-half

    Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Nov 2, 2000
    I remember reading it and thinking it was pretty funny as a child.
     
  4. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    I'm sure worms have a lot of protein...[face_laugh]
     
  5. halibut

    halibut Ex-Mod star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Aug 27, 2000
    12. A Wrinkle in Time - Madeleine L'Engle


    A Wrinkle in Time is a science fantasy novel by Madeleine L'Engle, first published in 1962. The book won a Newbery Medal, Sequoyah Book Award, and Lewis Carroll Shelf Award, and was runner-up for the Hans Christian Andersen Award. It is the first in L'Engle's series of books about the Murry and O'Keefe families.

    The book was written between 1959 and 1960. L'Engle has written repeatedly about the writing of the story and the long struggle to get it published. In A Circle of Quiet, she explains that the book was conceived "during a time of transition". After years of living at Crosswicks and running a general store, L'Engle's family, the Franklins, moved back to New York City, first taking a ten-week camping trip across the country and back again. L'Engle writes that "we drove through a world of deserts and buttes and leafless mountains, wholly new and alien to me. And suddenly into my mind came the names, Mrs. Whatsit. Mrs. Who. Mrs. Which." This was in the spring of 1959. L'Engle was reading about quantum physics at the time, which also made its way into the story. However, when she completed the book in early 1960, it was rejected by at least 26 publishers, because it was, in L'Engle's words, "too different", and "because it deals overtly with the problem of evil, and it was too difficult for children, and was it a children's or an adults' book, anyhow?"

    In "A Special Message from Madeleine L'Engle" on the Random House website, L'Engle explains another possible reason for the rejections: "A Wrinkle in Time had a female protagonist in a science fiction book," which at the time "wasn't done" according to L'Engle.
     
  6. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    Another possibility: it's dull (yes, I tried to read it once)
     
  7. WookatMe

    WookatMe Jedi Master star 4

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    Aug 22, 2010
    I remember reading this when I was much younger. I don't remember too much about it, but I remember at the time I loved it and it blew my mind. Odd that I don't remember more about the actual story. I should probably read it again, would probably bring up some fond memories.
     
  8. timmoishere

    timmoishere Jedi Grand Master star 6

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    Jun 2, 2007
    It's easily the best of the four books she wrote about Meg's family. The other three are, for lack of a better term, too weird. This one is pure space fantasy, with no telepathic microscopic creatures, no time-traveling to stop a madman, and no journey back to Biblical times to help Noah build his Ark (complete with angels having sex with humans, and the resulting baby physically ravaging the mother).

    L'Engle certainly knows how to set up a story's atmosphere. The first book had so many memorable locations, such as the planet where they had to journey to an extremely tall mountaintop in order to see evil more clearly. And the creepily symmetrical village where IT dominated had a very strong sense of "wrongness." Not to mention IT himself. I think I had nightmares about that scene when I was a kid.
     
  9. JohnWesleyDowney

    JohnWesleyDowney Jedi Master star 5

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    Jan 27, 2004
    L'Engle certainly knows how to set up a story's atmosphere. The first book had so many memorable locations, such as the planet where they had to journey to an extremely tall mountaintop in order to see evil more clearly. And the creepily symmetrical village where IT dominated had a very strong sense of "wrongness." Not to mention IT himself. I think I had nightmares about that scene when I was a kid.

    Same here, timmoishere, that book scared the crap out of me when I was a kid. Especially the "red eyes." :eek:
     
  10. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    I remember reading interviews with L'Engle, wherein she seemed to think she was a fount of creativity. She struck me as a humourless woman.
     
  11. halibut

    halibut Ex-Mod star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    11. Curses, Hexes, and Spells - Daniel Cohen

    Curses, Hexes and Spells is a 1974 book by Daniel Cohen. Marketed as children's book, it explains what exactly "curses" are, and describes supposed curses on families (such as the House of Atreus in Greek Mythology, the House of Habsburg or the Kennedy Family), creatures, places (the Bermuda Triangle, the Devil's Sea), wanderers (like the Flying Dutchman) and ghosts. It also describes a few protective amulets from supposed "occult" dangers, and briefly touches on birthstones.

    Curses, Hexes, and Spells is number 73 on the American Library Association's list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-2000. The book also appears on several other lists of "banned" or challenged books in the United States such as the 50 Most Frequently Banned Books in which it is number 11.
     
  12. Champion of the Force

    Champion of the Force Jedi Master star 4

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    Dec 27, 1999
    So basically it's an information book for children to help educate them as to what these things actually are, as well as explaining famous examples from the past. So of course people want it banned. :oops:
     
  13. halibut

    halibut Ex-Mod star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Aug 27, 2000
    BTW, if anyone can find out ANY info at all about the book(s) at number one in the list, I'd be grateful for a PM. I've been looking for months and cannot find out a single thing about it [face_plain]
     
  14. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    They seem to base the objection on the title.
     
  15. Ramza

    Ramza Administrator Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA VIP

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    Jul 13, 2008
    I love it when things get banned because OH NOEZ TEH WITCHCRAFTZ!!!1! Because that garbage is totally real.
     
  16. Champion of the Force

    Champion of the Force Jedi Master star 4

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    Dec 27, 1999
    That's the thing I guess - many people do think it is fair dinkum. Way back in my theistic days I used to go to a weekly Bible study - on one occasion a member quite seriously believed the reason why one of the other members was having a bad week was because (paraphrased) "it's a full moon, so all the witches and other pagans are probably out casting spells and stuff so there's a lot of evil around". [face_hypnotized]:oops:
     
  17. halibut

    halibut Ex-Mod star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Aug 27, 2000
    But of course believing in God is fine :p
     
  18. Ramza

    Ramza Administrator Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA VIP

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    Jul 13, 2008
    Honestly, XKCD put it best just the other day:
    [image=http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/the_economic_argument.png]
     
  19. halibut

    halibut Ex-Mod star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Aug 27, 2000
    10. Daddy's Roommate - Michael Willhoite

    So we enter the top 10

    The book, about a young boy whose divorced father now lives with his gay partner, deals with the controversial subject of homosexual parents.

    Daddy's Roommate was one of the first children's books to portray homosexuality in a positive light; the two men in the book do the same things heterosexual couples do: Take care of the house, argue, and spend time with their boy.

    Daddy's Roommate became a point of discussion in the 2008 US Presidential Election when it was alleged that, in 1995, Sarah Palin, then a councilwoman in Wasilla, Alaska, complained that the book did not belong in the public library


    So, the male equivalent of Number 18 in our list - Heather Has Two Mommies
     
  20. Rogue1-and-a-half

    Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Nov 2, 2000
    I've actually looked at this one. I found it in our local library system and gave it the ol' once over for cussedness' sake. One thing that was rather amusing was the fact that the titular character has about the most hilarious pornstache I've ever seen in a children's book. Not that kids would get the joke, but it did seem something slipped in as a definite gag for the adult readers.
     
  21. halibut

    halibut Ex-Mod star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Aug 27, 2000
    9. The Witches - Roald Dahl

    [image=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/41/TheWitches.jpg]

    The Witches is a children's book by Roald Dahl, first published in London in 1983 by Jonathan Cape. The book, like many of Dahl's works, is illustrated by Quentin Blake. Its content has made the book the frequent target of censors. The prominence of violence has also been an issue, while feminists in Britain claim the story is sexist.


    I have fond memories of this book. When I was 8, my teacher Mrs Butterworth read this book to us and I loved it. Not read it for many years. I really should read it again.

     
  22. Champion of the Force

    Champion of the Force Jedi Master star 4

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    Dec 27, 1999
    Roald Dahl was a genius - The Witches, George's Marvellous Medicine, Fantastic Mr Fox, The BFG, The Twits, Charlie & The Chocolate Factory, Matilda etc etc etc; he simply had an amazing run. Years later when critics commented that Rowling's Harry Potter series was 'Dahl-esque' they meant it as a compliment.

    Bit surprised at the comment The Witches is sexist - I don't recall any sexism at all, unless they're referring to the fact all witches are female. :confused: In particular I thought the grandmother was a fantastic character any child would admire.
     
  23. SithLordDarthRichie

    SithLordDarthRichie CR Emeritus: London star 8

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    Oct 3, 2003
    It is a great book, as are most of the books Dahl did.
    It was also a decent film with Angelica Houston & Rowan Atkinson.
     
  24. DarthBoba

    DarthBoba Manager Emeritus star 9 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Jun 29, 2000
    Yeah, never read the book, thought the movie was great.
     
  25. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    The books' heavies are all female; but so is the grandmother, who isn't.