An Open Letter To The Good Folks at LFL

Discussion in 'Literature' started by Trip, Nov 22, 2007.

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  1. ATimson Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 19, 2003
    star 4
    I can see that for Thrawn--shooting the poorly-trained sensor officer instead of the trainer who failed? Or indeed, shooting an officer at all? But I can't name anything Pelly did along the lines of indecency...
  2. Methodical Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 19, 2006
    star 1
    That's a good point. When Caedus kills a deck officer, it's because he's evil. When Thrawn does it, it's because he's a genius?

    I don't get that logic at all. Thrawn is/was a villian, no matter how cool people thought he was...
  3. rumsmuggler Chosen One

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    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
  4. jSarek VIP

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    Feb 18, 2005
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    Mostly complicity with Thrawn's actions, but you're right, I exaggerated his indecency. He was lacking in the nobility of his later incarnations, though.

    I can at least understand the thinking. Thrawn used death as a teaching tool, rather than a way to vent his frustrations or exercise his evilhood. He DIDN'T kill officers who made genuine efforts, even if they didn't succeed.
  5. Sinrebirth SWC and EUC Forum Moderator

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    Nov 15, 2004
    star 7
    Which, assumedly, is the difference between the True and Sith Empire's played out in the early EU.

    Thrawn, Pellaeon, Fel. Imperials who believed in order. Let's not forget Pellaeon killed Moff's with seeming regularity (per Revelation, and Fel has been criticised for wiping out the crew of the Dauntless and retroactively, in the sneakiest move I've seen in the EU, approving the mission to save the Princess simply to save face with his subordinates.

    *shrugs*

    The only difference is the motive. And Thrawn, Pellaeon and Fel have more justifications than Sidious, Vader, Iceheart, Carnor Jax and Caedus.
  6. ATimson Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 19, 2003
    star 4
    It's hardly "complicity" when it's the law. And when your superior has his personal band of assassins.

    Except, of course, when he did. :p
  7. Trip Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 7, 2003
    star 4
    No, he killed because he was a rabid racist. :p

    As for Pelly-- the man admires Daala. He's either a blind fool or a morally reprehensible individual. (I'm inclined to say it's a mix of the two.)
  8. jSarek VIP

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    Feb 18, 2005
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    Unlike Thrawn, we got to get inside of Pelly's head all of the time in TTT, and though he wasn't fond of Rukh, he wasn't following orders out of fear of him.

    And complicity with unjust laws is still complicity with injustice. More forgivable perhaps, but certainly not good.

    Name a time.

    Bullpoodoo. Gamer #5 may claim otherwise, but that's not what happened in the books, and the Gamer article was wrong about enough other things that I think we can call it an error. Thrawn's reasoning is crystal clear, and racial bias is nowhere involved.

    Yeah, I'd gotten the impression he'd managed to get some atrocities in during Darksaber, but since I still haven't read that book, I figured I'd leave it to someone else to elaborate.

    Pelly got his act together after he became Supreme Commander, finding both his competence and his moral compass. Before that, he was a bit lacking in both.
  9. Havac Some Guy Who Moderates Lit

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    Sep 29, 2005
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    Pellaeon wasn't complicit in any atrocities in Darksaber. The only think he did was attack Yavin, and Jedi (who were all still adult students at that time) are pretty legitimate targets. He even landed ground troops instead of just bombarding the temples to slag, so it's possible he was even going for capture, though I just chalk that up to KJA using ridiculously bad tactics as usual.
  10. ATimson Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 19, 2003
    star 4
    Far better than not complying with them, especially when it's a direct order from a superior. There are frameworks for not obeying illegal orders, but not ones you consider "immoral".

    Cris Pieterson, shortly after Luke's (first) escape from the Chimaera's tractor beam.
  11. Havac Some Guy Who Moderates Lit

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    I think jSarek would argue that Pieterson didn't make a genuine effort. He just kind of accepted failure because there was nothing in the manual about it, and so he didn't actually try anything.
  12. ATimson Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 19, 2003
    star 4
    Thrawn himself said that the fault was the training officer's, and not Pieterson's. Yet who ends up dead?
  13. Trip Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 7, 2003
    star 4
    ATimson - that's because poor Cris didn't have pretty blue skin. :(

    jSarek - The Gamer #5 article is in-universe, too. I just like its assertions. :p

    Re: Pelly - in Revelation he's as doddering and evil as ever.
  14. AdmiralNick22 Fleet Admiral of Literature

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    May 28, 2003
    star 6
    Pellaeon was fairly put of character in Revelation, IMO. He went from a pro-Alliance former Supreme Commander to a rabid Imperial who was waiting for the Alliance to fail.

    There were glimmers of Pellaeon's true character in the book, but overall it did not match his previous appearances.

    Wait, what's this thread about? :p

    --Adm. Nick
  15. Trip Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 7, 2003
    star 4
    Well, it makes sense when you consider that this is (if I'm remembering right) the first time in a long time we've gotten to look so deep into Pelly's sick, sad little mind. It makes sense that we'd see more of his true nature.

    I'm not really sure. :p
  16. Havac Some Guy Who Moderates Lit

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    Actually, I didn't find it that surprising. Pellaeon's always been an Empire-Is-The-Best-Way pro-stability and pro-order guy. He was friendly to the NR after the peace, but only joined up with it once it became join or die and he decided that the galaxy's best hope for stability and order was the Imperial Remnant being a part of the GA. He likes the GA. It's working. Then it fouls up the war horribly, and he's terribly disillusioned with the GA as a result, and goes back to considering the IR alone the galaxy's best hope for stability. It's rather logical to me, at least.
  17. RushinSundaws Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Feb 23, 2005
    star 2
    You'd think they might actually listen to what their fans want...but thus is life.
  18. ATimson Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 19, 2003
    star 4
    "What fans want" and "what a small self-selected group of fans on the Internets want" are not necessarily the same thing. :p
  19. J_K_DART Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 31, 2001
    star 5
    But they're not necessarily different either...
  20. ATimson Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 19, 2003
    star 4
    True, but I'd argue that they generally are, given how sales of books and the online reactions so rarely match up. (This isn't exclusive to Star Wars; I see much the same among the Star Trek novels as well.)
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