"... and that is the way of the force"

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by Eliza_Skywalker, Nov 26, 2006.

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  1. Eliza_Skywalker Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 3, 2006
    Just before Yoda dies in E VI he has that dialogue with Luke, telling him, that he is old and sick now and that he is going to die.
    "I am strong with the force but not that strong", Yoda admids, "and this is the way of all living things" and continues "that is the way of the force".
    So I asked myself for a long time what Yoda wants to say with "and that is the way of the force". I hope some of you guys can help me out with good ideas.

    If this topic has been discussed before I apologize. I tried to search for it but got an "error".
  2. sith_rising Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 7, 2004
    star 4
    He tells him, "that is the way of things". He means that all life and creation eventually crumble, and that trying to hold on to these things only causes anguish.
  3. Alpha-02 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2006
    star 4
    What I think he means, as Yoda says himself is that "Death is a natural part of life."
  4. Sinnion Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Sep 24, 2006
    star 3
    basically telling him not to **** up like his daddy.


    Language kids, language... ;)
  5. foucault Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Aug 21, 2006
    I do think it has to do with Yoda accepting his death and letting go of life.
  6. jedi_jacks Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 17, 2005
    star 4
    . . . and becoming a force-ghost.
  7. Eliza_Skywalker Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 3, 2006
    Okay, I think this part of Yodas dialogue is quite clear - it is the way of all things that they must die - sooner or later.
    But why does he tell Luke, that this is also "the way of the force"? If Yoda only wanted to explain to Luke the natural circle of life - well, for that his "that is the way of all things" would be enough to explain. So my question is: "What is the way of the force"? Is there a kind of circle which the force follows during the centuries?
  8. foucault Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Aug 21, 2006
    It is a metaphor. But the Force itself is part of the circle of life. Without Force there simply wouldn't be any life. Therefore the natural course he takes, his letting go and going back into the void is part of the so-called 'will of the force'.
  9. Miss_Malpensa Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Nov 29, 2006
    That's great for Force users, but what about the rest of us who can't come back as Force ghosts? I think Yoda is a little disingenuous on many fronts, especially here where he knows death is not really the end, well, not for him at any rate.

    Is it right that if you have a certain number of midichlorians and if circumstances are right you get to live on (remain sentient) when others cannot? Man, the Force really is a harsh mistress after all.
  10. DarthBoba Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 29, 2000
    star 9
    We have no input on the afterlife as regular folks deem it, beyond that the Gungans assumedly do (as they refer to their Gods on several occasions) and that Han's Corellian upbringing has a Hell in it (and therefore, presumably a Heaven.)

    It's an imaginary galaxy. There's room for several different "this is what happens after you die" notions here. :p

    Edit: Just thought I'd add this:

    If noone-absolutely noone-mentioned an afterlife to a fairly cloistered religious order (ie, the Jedi) for 25,000 years, I wouldn't consider them to be the final word on what happens after you die. :p
  11. darth-sinister Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 28, 2001
    star 9
    The Force is nature in Star Wars. It has a cycle that everyone and everything goes through. Death is a natrual part of life. The Force (nature) wills it to be so. Yoda does not want Luke to tread the same path as his father. He warns him that people will die. He cannot stop that and it is pointless to try it. Yoda is also telling him what Qui-gon told him. To defy oblivion, it cannot be done for others. Only for yourself through retaining ones identity and this only works for the Jedi and the Whills.
  12. DarthBoba Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 29, 2000
    star 9
    How bout we just agree to disagree? I really don't feel like debating intangibles. :p
  13. XAeon Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 4, 2004
    star 1
    However, Vader (the fork in the road - so to speak) followed the force, allbeit the dark side.

    Nature willed it to be so.

    Herein lies the lesson. Find balance.

    In confronting Vader, find your father. Find Anakin.
  14. YYZ-2112 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 3, 2004
    star 4
    I think it's important to note that not only does the person need to be a force user to become a force ghost but also that only a force user can see; or really commune with these ghosts. This adds an interesting possibility to the nature of all things after life. It is quite possible that even non force users exist in some form of sentient spirit on the other side just as the force ghosts do, but that givin their limited afinity with the force (I say limited because all living things have the force flowing through them) they are not able to commune with the living. This also makes one wonder if Padme isn't also looking upon her children but is unseen. Perhaps only those force ghosts can feel her (or anyone's) presence there. Yoda does sort of say that all beings transform into the force when they expire. This gives hope that perhaps Padme and Anakin were united again, but we as the audience just don't get to see it onscreen.
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