1. MERRY "TALK LIKE A PIRATE" DAY! ARR!

Baseball Strategy: Managing from your recliner 101

Discussion in 'Archive: The Arena' started by BarryBonds25, Nov 16, 2006.

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  1. BarryBonds25 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 26, 2003
    star 3
    This thread is for in-depth analysis of baseball strategy. Talk about hit-and-run plays, suicide squeezes and lefty-lefty matchups here. In the coming days I will be bringing up various situations to discuss baseball strategy.
  2. ObiWan506 Former Head Admin

    Member Since:
    Aug 5, 2003
    star 7
  3. Rogue...Jedi Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jan 12, 2000
    star 7
    I agree, this should be a great thread. Look forward to some good discussion here.
  4. Armenian_Jedi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 14, 2003
    star 7
    suicide squeezes have to be some of the most frustrating plays to watch when your team is on the pitching side of it... everything seems to be going in slow motion for you and it looks like you should be able to get the guy out at home... gah, I hate it.


    and I've never seen my team do it, so I've never been too excited about this play. :p
  5. ObiWan506 Former Head Admin

    Member Since:
    Aug 5, 2003
    star 7
    Note to self when playing the Diamondbacks: Suicide squeeze!
  6. BarryBonds25 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 26, 2003
    star 3
    First up, the intentional walk with the bases loaded. The ultimate show of respect. Giving the other team a run for free believing that you can get their next hitter out. A brief summary of the 4 times in the history of the game that it has occurred.

    o Napoleon Lajoie, May 23, 1901 - the Athletics were batting against the White Sox in the top of the ninth inning. They were down, 11-7, but had the bases loaded and none out with Lajoie - on his way to a Triple Crown - up. Manager Clark Griffith inserted himself as relief pitcher and "calmly sent four wide ones across" to deliberately force in a run, bringing future home run champs Socks Seybold and Harry Davis up with the bases still full. Griffith then disposed of Seybold, Davis, and Morgan Murphy on infield grounders, saving the 11-9 win.
    o Del Bissonette, May 2, 1928 - the Giants led the Dodgers, 2-0, in the top of the ninth, but Brooklyn loaded the bases with two out. Giants' manager John McGraw then ordered pitcher Larry Benton to walk Bissonette, in his 16th major league game, purposely ending the shutout. Benton then struck out Harry Riconda to end the game.
    o Bill Nicholson, July 23, 1944 (2nd game) - The Giants led the Cubs, 10-7, in the top of the eighth with the bases loaded, none out, and Nicholson - who had homered four times already that day - at the plate. Giants' manager Mel Ott (who was probably sitting next to McGraw at the above game) ordered Ewald Pyle to walk Nicholson, bringing up Dom Dallessandro, Andy Pafko, and Don Johnson. The Cubs tied the game up by the time the inning was over, but New York went on to win, 12-10.
    o Barry Bonds, May 28, 1998 - The Diamondbacks led the Giants, 8-6 in the bottom of the ninth, with two out, the bases loaded, and Barry Bonds up. Arizona manager Buck Showalter ordered Gregg Olson to issue the IBB, putting the tying run on third and the winning run on second. Brent Mayne then lined out to end the game.

    Would you issue an intentional walk with the bases loaded if you were managing? Discuss.
  7. Armenian_Jedi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 14, 2003
    star 7
    If I was in the situation that my DBacks were, I would. Barry Bonds circa 98 was unstoppable and he was only getting better. Brent Mayne is... Brent Mayne. I'll take my chances up one run with Mayne then up two runs with Bonds.
  8. Reynar_Tedros Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 3, 2006
    star 6
    You have to look at the stats of the player up to bat, and the player on deck. How does each batter fare with bases loaded and/or RISP. And it depends on your situation. If it's a close game, I doubt I'd ever do it. But if I'm in the bottom of the ninth, up 6 runs with a reliever on the mound, and, say, Albert Pujols is up with bases loaded, do I walk him? Sure. I'd give up the run and be in the same situation with a worse hitter up 5 runs, than be up only 2 runs with the other side having so much momentum.
  9. Yodave27 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Feb 2, 2001
    star 4
    See if it's a six run lead, what do I care if he hits a grand slam. There's no way I walk anybody with a six run lead. Now give me the same situation with a two or three run lead and I might do it. Pujols can't hit a six run homer there.
  10. Rogue...Jedi Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jan 12, 2000
    star 7
    See if it's a six run lead, what do I care if he hits a grand slam. There's no way I walk anybody with a six run lead. Now give me the same situation with a two or three run lead and I might do it. Pujols can't hit a six run homer there.

    Agreed. At most, pitch him close out of the strike zone - not giving him easy strikes, but not really giving him anything to hit either, see if he'll swing at anything. But an intentional walk? no.

    That said, there are situations when I would walk someone intentionally with the bases loaded, depending on who was behind him, how big the lead was, etc.
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