Best age to start with sports?

Discussion in 'Archive: The Arena' started by Skiara, Dec 2, 2006.

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  1. Skiara ~• Manager WNU •~ ~• RSA FFC •~

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    Member Since:
    Nov 5, 2002
    star 10
    What do you think, when should anyone start with sports? What is the best age?

    If you want to become very good and maybe a champion, it is said that you have to start extremely early. But then you (or better the trainer and parents) have to keep a close eye on the training, so the child and his/her physical constitution don't get overstrained.

    If a young kid is already very good at (let's say) gymnastics, do you think the kids wants it or is it the wish of the parents?

    Or is it better to start at an older age? Then some things are harder to learn and others easier, but you can't overstrain your body in a dangerous way that easily. Of course, it is still possible, but you know what you do. The danger lies more in your own ambition and not in the training.

    So what would you suggest to anyone at which age should they start with your favorite sport and what would you say in general?
  2. ApolloSmileGirl Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 18, 2004
    star 8
    It really just depends on what sport, at what age. I mean some mothers begin their babies in swimming before they can walk.

    Three or four is a good age for basic, noncontact fundimental sports like soccer. Three or four is also a good age to start on gymnastics, tummbling, and basic, basic dance.

    I'd say seven or eight for baseball/softball/basketball. I don't think serious contact sports should be allowed for anyone under 11 or 12, and that includes hockey and football.
  3. epic Ex Mod / RSA

    Member Since:
    Jul 4, 1999
    star 7
    if i have a kid they will be learning:

    a. golf
    b. tennis
    c. nfl punter or special team

    as early as possible.
  4. Everton Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jul 18, 2003
    star 10
    Football isn't non-contact; despite the best efforts of its governing bodies.

    But sure, younger is better. The real top footballers are often first identified at Primary School level (9 or 10 years old).
  5. Mar17swgirl Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Dec 26, 2000
    star 7
    Generally, I'd say the younger the better. Take skiing for example (yeah, because I have vast experience in there... :p): kids who learn to ski usually overcome their fear much more easily than adult non-skiers. Same goes for swimming - letting your child learn to swim when it's still a baby is better than waiting for it to grow up, because babies don't fear and swimming is really a natural movement (only later in life we develop a fear of drowning).
  6. ApolloSmileGirl Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 18, 2004
    star 8
    No, it's not totally non-contact, but at that age is, more often than not. At least that's how it was, when I was that age.
  7. EMPEROR_WINDU Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 23, 2002
    star 5
    If they're going to play soccer, better to start them off in acting school so they can practice taking dives...
  8. JOHNNY-B Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Mar 18, 2003
    star 2
    To me, it's best to start them out, when they come to you; and tap you on the shoulder an say: "I think I want to give that sport a try." That to me, tells me there ready. It means they have taken a liking to the sport, by: either watching it on tv, seeing it live, or maybe even trying to play it at school, and now there ready to take there own shot at it...That's when "IMO", you need to give them that shot. Atleast that's how my Dad did it with me.
  9. Skiara ~• Manager WNU •~ ~• RSA FFC •~

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    But it is supposed to be non-contact. :p


    I agree with Johnny. The kids should be able to develope their own interest and choose on their own which sport they want to do. But in my view it is good if parents show their kids some kind of sports like going swimming, playing with a ball, going to the stable (sitting on a horse for some few minutes), doing other things that involves movements, because it is good if kids don't learn to sit at home all day long.


    I don't know what I shall think about those parents whose young kid is doing a sport at a high level already. It's hard to imagine that the child wanted it all by himself/herself, but on the other hand I don't want to believe that there are so many parents out there who forces their kids to become perfect... Do you have any experiences?
  10. DurronFan Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 25, 2005
    star 4
    You can actually start a sport too young imo. There's a risk in starting a sport before the age seven or eight; that being that the kid becomes too competitive. You can't let a sport overpower a child in the sense that it becomes their #1 thing in life. It's better that they don't play any sport at all than that. Unfortunately sports such as golf and tennis have become so competetive and developed that the only way to become successful in them is to start at a very young age. When I see 11-year-olds practice golf for 6-8 hours a day while giving less concentration to school it makes me sad. Now you might blame parents for something like that but sometimes parents love their children too much to say no.
  11. Rogue...Jedi Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jan 12, 2000
    star 7
    Little kid soccer involves a lot less contact than professional soccer, definitely.

    And although I never played it, I'd drop at least a couple years off that 7-8 for baseball. I have two nephews that have been playing for a few years now, one is just now 7 and the other is 5... start off with T-ball, then coaches pitch, and move up. They love playing and the way they have it structured works really well for their age.
  12. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Nov 4, 1998
    star 7
    I think kids should be encouraged to try as many sports as possible when they're young, I think it's definetly bad to specialise in just one sport before the age of 12 or 13. I also think it's sad if a kid at 12 who just recently discovered a sport can't practice it because he or she should have started several years earlier, and is now too far behind to be able to take part in the training.

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