Amph Book Recommendations

Discussion in 'Archive: SF&F: Books and Comics' started by NYCitygurl, Feb 4, 2006.

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  1. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

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    Jul 20, 2002
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    I know that I, for one, am looking for some good books to read, and I'm sure I'm not the only one. What books would you recommend to others?


    I like The Wayfarer Redemption by Sara Douglass
    Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier
    and the books by Robert Jordan, Elizabeth Hayden, and Terry Pratchet and Neil Gaimen's Good Omens.
  2. JediTrilobite Force Ghost

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    All the classics. Dune, Foundation, Ringworld, etc.
  3. droideka27 Manager Emeritus

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    George R. R. Martin's Song of Fire and Ice. I just wanted to be the first one to say it :p
  4. Jedi_Master_Conor Manager Emeritus

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  5. DRHJ9 Force Ghost

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    I like:

    The Dark Tower series by Stephen King

    Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone series by Greg Keyes

    Saga of Seven Suns series by Kevin J. Anderson

    there are a lot more, but these are in my direct line of sight :p
  6. Sanctimoniously Jedi Grand Master

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    Dec 28, 2005
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    Psychohistorical Crisis, by Donald Kingsbury. Who hasn't wanted to find out what life is like in the 751st century?

    Halo: The Fall of Reach, The Flood, and First Strike, by Eric Nylund, William C. Dietz, and Eric Nylund (respectively). It's friggin' Halo.
  7. Queen_Pixie Jedi Master

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    Jul 20, 1999
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    Are those books any better than Anderson's SW books?

    I am in need of new fantasy authors. But no books that are similar to Dragonlance/ Dungeons and Dragons.
  8. sidious618 Force Ghost

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    Apr 20, 2003
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    Ditto. Fantastic series.
  9. Commander-DWH Shiny Costuming & Props Manager

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    The Eyre Affair, Lost in a Good Book, The Well of Lost Plots, and Something Rotten by Jasper Fforde. They are brilliant, and any bibliophile should read them.
  10. Excellence Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 28, 2002
    star 7

    My recommendations are dependant on your genre preferences, NYCitygurl. What kinds of books do you like to read?

    Erikson's Malazan military fantasy series is maturely written for mature readers
    Martin's medieval Song of Ice and Fire series is easier to read but subclasses women like 90% of all vile fantasists
    Russell's Swans' War Trilogy is good for a light casual read
    I've heard positive reviews for Ombria in Shadow, yet to read it myself
    Berg's Bridge of D'Arnath Trilogy is good sword and sorcery
    Bujold's Curse of Chalion is also good for a light reading. Well written. You'd like it.
    May's Conqueror's Moon is blandly written and nothing special. But Vader's mullet, there's so many scheming parties I was interested in knowing who would come first. The finale was predictable and trite, but it was the journey of anticipation I admit I enjoyed.

    You read sci fi, NYCitygurl?
  11. Jedi_Jimbo Jedi Grand Master

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    Oct 1, 2004
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    The Forever War by Joe Haldeman. A classic.

    I am Legend by Richard Matheson

    Both classics and very enjoyable.
  12. DRHJ9 Force Ghost

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    I think they are, and they are very different than Dragonlance. There are a lot of interesting characters, and a lot of storylines within the main story.
  13. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

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    Fantasy, actually. Not really into sci-fi.

    And you can call me Nat, everyone does.
  14. Raja_Io Force Ghost

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    Aug 28, 2005
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    Ursula le Guin - the Earthsea saga:

    A Wizard of Earthsea
    The Tombs of Atuan
    The Farthest shore
    Tehanu
  15. FatBurt Force Ghost

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    Jul 21, 2003
    star 5
    Magician by Raymond E Feist (followed by the rest of his works in order)

    Magicians Guild by Trudie Canavan

    Saga of Seven Suns by KJA (Very different to his Star Wars stuff in style but his writing style is similar)

  16. malcolm-darth-am-i Jedi Master

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  17. DRHJ9 Force Ghost

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    May 19, 2003
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    The Dragon Crown War cycle by Michael A. Stackpole is pretty good.
  18. Raja_Io Force Ghost

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    You know what, Nat... I seems like everybody is just posting their favourite books. You can't complain about the lack of books, though :D
  19. DRHJ9 Force Ghost

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    May 19, 2003
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    When you recommend a book, it is usually one of your favorites, or one you like isn't it :confused:
  20. LilyHobbitJedi Jedi Grand Master

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    Aug 29, 2005
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    I have to recommend the Lord of the Rings trilogy, they are amazing. :)
  21. malcolm-darth-am-i Jedi Master

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    May 21, 2005
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    I dont know if this counts but definatly

    The Da Vinci Code-Dan Brown
    Angles & Deamons-Dan Brown

    These are both very fun books. A little out there, its like a 24/48 hour time frame thing. But fun. And yes all the facts are true. But the story is entirly Fictonal.
  22. droideka27 Manager Emeritus

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    May 28, 2002
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    Also, I am of the opinion that everyone who likes star wars should read ender's game.
  23. ezekiel22x Chosen One

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    Aug 9, 2002
    star 4
    Off the top of my head:

    The Book of the New Sun, Gene Wolfe: a seminal fantasy work comprised of immaculate prose, and the strongest first person perspective I?ve ever read. Though the book is certainly a challenge with its ability to offer a narrative defined by sometimes impenetrable allusion, Wolfe is also a master of conveying core element of humanity that are instantly recognizable and relatable.

    Heroes Die and Blade of Tyshalle, Matthew Stover: Like I said in a recent thread on Stover, the story here is a seamless blend of sci-fi and fantasy, and presents some of the grittiest literature around. Physically, emotionally, and thematically, the books hit hard.

    The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, Stephen Donaldson: I was wary of him at first upon hearing people complain about too many Tolkien riffs, but upon reading the first three books I?m convinced that Donaldson maintains an underlying philosophical stance Tolkien never dreamed of attaining. The title character of Covenant is one of the genre?s most unique, a ?hero? that is anything but archetypical with his constant, bitter worldview that simultaneously manages to capture the best and worst aspects ingrained in humanity.

    Perdido Street Station, China Mieville: Weird fiction at its finest. The city of New Crobuzon is an instantly classic setting, while Mieville?s tendency to throw the reader stunning dark twists of truth brazenly tests the boundaries of sympathetic/unsympathetic characters.

    American Gods, Neil Gaiman: Actually, read anything and everything by Gaiman (including the iconic comic series The Sandman), but as far as novels go this is the best. Gaiman artistically blends very old myth with modern day societal commentary in result that is sometimes dark, sometimes humorous, but always highly readable.

    Also, I?ll second a few things:

    The Dark Tower, Stephen King
    Malazan Book of the Fallen, Steven Erikson
    A Song of Ice and Fire, George R.R. Martin

    And list a few more that, while not nearly as groundbreakingly original as some of the others I?ve mentioned, still represent fantasy worth reading.

    The Farseer, Robin Hobb
    The Kingdom of Thorn and Bone, Greg Keyes
    The War of the Flowers, Tad Williams

  24. Gabri_Jade VIP

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    Nov 9, 2002
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    QFT.

    I'd also recommend the Miles Vorkosigan books by Lois McMaster Bujold, in order: Falling Free, Shards of Honor, Barrayar, Warrior's Apprentice, The Mountains of Mourning, The Vor Game, Cetaganda, Ethan of Athos, Labryinth, Borders of Infinity, Brothers in Arms, Mirror Dance, Memory, Komarr, A Civil Campaign, Winterfair Gifts, and Diplomatic Immunity.

    I'm about halfway through that series (based on the recommendations of friends :p ), and they're awesome. :D
  25. DRHJ9 Force Ghost

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    May 19, 2003
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    I agree. I would recommend both series, the Shadow series and the Ender quartet.

    The Shadow series tells the story of how Enders brother Peter becomes the leader of earth with the help of Ender's battle school friends Bean and Petra. Bean and Petra are the primary characters though.

    The Speaker, or Ender series as some people call it, tells the story of what happens to Ender after the events of Enders Game.

    They are both good series, but different.
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