Commandment of the internet: thou shalt hate Star Wars Prequels?

Discussion in 'Star Wars Community' started by Darth Xalfrea, Mar 30, 2013.

  1. Darth Xalfrea Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jan 2, 2013
    star 3
    I've observed here and some other places. If you mention you like the prequels, chances are people will start asking questions like "how dare you", "a true star wars fans hates the prequels", and "are you an idiot?"

    Is it some un-written rule of the Internet that Prequel bashing makes you cool, or it's like the solemn duty of people on the Internet to make sure nobody loves the prequels?
  2. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    Before the prequels, there was something of a "thou shalt hate RoTJ" tendency.

    (There were a few people who hated TESB- but that never really took off).

    People who want to go against "the mainstream view" often do so by loudly hating on popular things.
  3. Darth Xalfrea Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jan 2, 2013
    star 3
    I don't think I've seen anybody hate on the first Star Wars movie. Empire Strikes Back I can't imagine either, but maybe during the prehistoric days before the Internet made us all a bunch of pessimists, that's possible.

    ROTJ I could see for those that strictly stay in the OT camp. But for prequel hate, it's usually you hate one, you hate them all.
  4. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    Michael Moorcock disliked the first Star Wars movie:

    http://flag.blackened.net/liberty/moorcock.html

    An anarchist is not a wild child, but a mature, realistic adult imposing laws upon the self and modifying them according to an experience of life, an interpretation of the world. A 'rebel', certainly, he or she does not assume 'rebellious charm' in order to placate authority (which is what the rebel heroes of all these genre stories do). There always comes the depressing point where Robin Hood doffs a respectful cap to King Richard, having clobbered the rival king. This sort of implicit paternalism is seen in high relief in the currently popular Star Wars series which also presents a somewhat disturbing anti-rationalism in its quasi-religious 'Force' which unites the Jedi Knights (are we back to Wellsian 'samurai' again?) and upon whose power they can draw, like some holy brotherhood, some band of Knights Templar. Star Wars is a pure example of the genre (in that it is a compendium of other people's ideas) in its implicit structure -- quasi-children, fighting for a paternalistic authority, win through in the end and stand bashfully before the princess while medals are placed around their necks.
    Star Wars carries the paternalistic messages of almost all generic adventure fiction (may the Force never arrive on your doorstep at three o'clock in the morning) and has all the right characters. it raises 'instinct' above reason (a fundamental to Nazi doctrine) and promotes a kind of sentimental romanticism attractive to the young and idealistic while protective of existing institutions. It is the essence of a genre that it continues to promote certain implicit ideas even if the author is unconscious of them. In this case the audience also seems frequently unconscious of them.
    Last edited by Iron_lord, Mar 30, 2013
  5. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    post error.

    EDIT: I've found the closest thing to a really bad review of The Empire Strikes Back:

    http://acertainpointofview.net/?p=1479

    and the person reading that review- comments on how similar the methods of criticizing it are, to those of criticising the prequels in this day and age.
    Last edited by Iron_lord, Mar 30, 2013
  6. Sistros Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 24, 2010
    star 6
    no, it's just different people with different viewpoints

    some people love the PT

    some people hate the PT

    some people (like me) think they're ok

    on the flip side someone could easily say to you "how dare you LOVE the OT? it's nothing but bland set pieces and muppets in swamps" same sort of thing