Clone Wars Could Dooku issue Order 66?

Discussion in 'Star Wars TV' started by Vialco, May 2, 2014.

  1. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    Possibly because that's not the way genetic modification works - it's macro-level rather than micro-level.
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  2. anakinfansince1983 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2011
    star 7
    To my knowledge no one genetically modifies humans in our world so how would TCW writers know how it works?

    I was certainly given the impression from AOTC that the Kaminoans were well paid to clone humans who are more obedient than we are but could still "think creatively." I could have bought into this arc if there had been commentary in the movies about the high quality of Kaminoan inhibitor chips as opposed to high quality of Kaminoan clones.

    As it was, there is nothing about what I saw in the PT that meshes with the idea of an inhibitor chip.
  3. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    Probably from reading about how animals have been genetically modified.

    I think @Mia Mesharad could probably explain in detail why Traviss went with "conditioned to obey orders" rather than "engineered to obey orders" - and why it makes sense that TCW would at least take a similar approach, with "You'll find that they are totally obedient" being sales talk rather than the absolute truth.
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  4. TaradosGon Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Feb 28, 2003
    star 4
    I highly, highly, highly doubt that the writers/Lucas did any kind of research into cloning. The idea that there's actually a bio-chip in their heads that somehow reacts to the external stimulus of the precise words "execute Order 66" and makes them compliant, overriding any free will, is not something that any kind of real world (EDIT: cloning) bioengineering is anywhere close to being able to achieve, though I also wouldn't necessarily write it off as impossible, because I don't think our knowledge of genetics and biology are anywhere near advanced enough to even make that determination.

    Take 10 year old man-child soldiers, indoctrinate them with loyalty to the Republic at a young age, and genetically modify them via techniques that are way beyond those that we have achieved (which isn't saying much, since in a lot of ways we are barely scratching the surface) and I see no reason why it's hard to swallow that a clone would shoot their commander in the back, merely because they were told to do so by the leader of the government they were indoctrinated to obey.
    Last edited by TaradosGon, May 14, 2014
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  5. anakinfansince1983 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2011
    star 7
    If the writers used animal genetic modifications, the inhibitor chip makes even less sense. Genetically modified animals are modified at the molecular level, not via the insertion of a chip in their brains.

    Plus the clones were paid for already, there was no need for a sales pitch of any kind at that point.

    The only real reason I see for using the kill-switch approach is to enable viewers to maintain the impression that the clones were good guys by viewing them as victims.

    I didn't really see them as villains per se in ROTS, just soldiers whose loyalties were with the Chancellor before the Jedi and who didn't question orders that came from him. I did not need moral clones who would always do right unless they were coerced to do wrong.

    We were also always given the impression that the clones of the PT became the stormtroopers of the OT, EU sources aside. The inhibitor chip concept messes that up.

    The Order 66 scene in ROTS was not "broke" and if it ain't broke, don't "fix" it.
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  6. Dark Lord Tarkas Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 29, 2011
    star 4
    I don't think it was a matter of the scene needing fixing, just finally giving an explicit explanation. I never had a strongly held interpretation about what exactly was going on in the clones' minds during Order 66, but it was something I was curious about. Now I know the answer. I think that's pretty cool and I'm glad they did it. I would think the same thing if there was no inhibitor chip. I just to like to be shown exactly what was going on with it and I don't find either alternative particularly objectionable. This is just one of a myriad of ways in which GL stuck a clone army in his PT without addressing any of the issues that might entail from moral implications to the nuts-and-bolts of Order 66. Thanks again, TCW.
  7. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    The point being that the brain is just not that well understood that one can modify genes and guarantee specific behavioural changes.
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  8. Dark Lord Tarkas Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 29, 2011
    star 4
    I'm sorry, are things that are impossible by modern science also impossible in Star Wars? What about lightsabers, hyperdrive, the Death Star, landspeeders....
  9. anakinfansince1983 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2011
    star 7
    You all are actually making my point. GFFA science seems advanced enough that the genetic modification for obedience could be easily done without an inhibitor chip, and given the Kaminoans' reputation and obvious success at cloning, done well.
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  10. Robimus Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 6, 2007
    star 5
    Problem being, via decree from LFL, it is all one canon now. Inhibitor chips, and The Clone Wars(gag) are as canon as the films are. All the better reason to avoid the concept of canon completely now I guess............

    Excuse me, I have to go throw up.
    anakinfansince1983 likes this.
  11. Dark Lord Tarkas Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 29, 2011
    star 4
    TCW is a vastly better improvement on Star Wars canon than the PT.
  12. anakinfansince1983 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2011
    star 7
    I agree regarding Anakin, but strongly disagree regarding Order 66 and the clones.
  13. Robimus Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 6, 2007
    star 5
    Thats really subjective, Tarkas.

    In some places it may be, but in other places(like these inhibitor chips) it just beats us over the head with something that was completely unnecessary.
  14. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    I do think it sounds somewhat unnecessary - but I haven't seen the episode to assess it thoroughly yet.

    In the EU we got "social conditioning to obey orders" - and maybe "genetic engineering to remove Jango's predisposition to solitariness and disobedience" - a chip on top of that could be an "insurance policy" in case the other things fail.
  15. Vialco Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 6, 2007
    star 4
    Yes! This is exactly what it was. Palpatine wouldn't just trust that the clones would follow orders for something as important as Order 66. He made sure that his Grand Plan wipe out the Jedi was foolproof. Those inhibitor chips ensured that the clones would turn on the Jedi, no matter how close or friendly they became with their commanders.
  16. anakinfansince1983 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2011
    star 7
    I was definitely not given the impression that the chip was a backup plan or insurance policy. It seemed to me like it was the plan itself.
  17. Dark Lord Tarkas Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 29, 2011
    star 4
    You are absolutely right, and I might even go one further and say it is totally subjective, but I have gotten in this habit of sometimes stating my opinion as fact when it is in response to someone else stating their opinion as fact. It makes the rhetorical point without having to make it. I don't really mind the chips, there are a lot worse things in TCW.