Education in America

Discussion in 'Archive: The Senate Floor' started by The1, Sep 5, 2002.

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  1. PaulSanderson Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Sep 3, 2002
    The public education system in the US has been appalling for years and is only getting worse. People leave high school, even college, and can't even string a cohesively written sentence together (ie. using correct spelling and grammar). Check out the million poorly written messages online to see proof of this. That speaks volumes. However, it's a malaise common around the world in the public school system. Seems to be worse in the US though.
  2. Maveric Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 17, 1999
    star 4
    I have seen that many people who I communicate with over the internet know they are not using correct grammar or punctuation, but just do not care.


    Sad, isn't it?

    In Texas, we spend over 1 billion a year on developmental programs for students who do not meet the requirements for college level classes.
  3. Fire_Ice_Death Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 15, 2001
    star 7
    The public education system in the US has been appalling for years and is only getting worse. People leave high school, even college, and can't even string a cohesively written sentence together (ie. using correct spelling and grammar). Check out the million poorly written messages online to see proof of this. That speaks volumes. However, it's a malaise common around the world in the public school system. Seems to be worse in the US though.

    Yez you iz right. I's ca nt puut toogather a comp leet sen tance.

  4. Ariana Lang Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Oct 10, 1999
    star 5
    The Public education system in America is scary. I went to high school in Fort Worth, at a private school, which is a good thing because we have one of the worst public school systems in the state -- unless you can get into the accellerated program at Paschal. But I had a lot of friends who went to public school. And they were learning things in their third year of Spanish that I learned in 7th grade. Just everything about the school this one friend went to seemed inherently wrong to me.

    I don't know. I have a pretty skewed view on things because of my private school education, where kids would have nevervous breakdowns if they got C's on their report cards. But I think even if public school systems did something seemingly minute like requiring smaller classes -- say 20 per class -- that would help enormously. Small classes where there's discussion and the teacher knows all the kids makes everything so much easier.
  5. Darth_Omega Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 19, 2002
    star 6
    breakdowns if they got C's on their report cards

    What's wrong with a C :confused:

    It's a 6 right?

    6 are ok, a lot of children here get a 6, but they don't cry about it (getting a 10 or A+ is very hard here, it's near impossible to get a 10 for your final exam)

    Are the tests easy in the USA? It's so akward when I hear Americans (British and Canadians as well) bragging how they got a A+ on their exam...
  6. Mastadge Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 4, 1999
    star 7
    6 are ok, a lot of children here get a 6, but they don't cry about it (getting a 10 or A+ is very hard here, it's near impossible to get a 10 for your final exam)

    Theoretically.

    The way American grades tend to breakdown:

    A -- Anyone who wants to get into a decent college/university better get a good number of these.
    B -- This is probably the average.
    C -- "Average," theoretically, but it's really below average.
    D -- Failure, without actually failing. This is often not a passing grade on tests, but it is in a course.
    F -- Failure
  7. Fire_Ice_Death Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 15, 2001
    star 7
    Don't forget the almighty E for excellence. ;) I's gots me an edumacashun. M-O-O-N, that spells edumacashun.
  8. leia393 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 24, 2001
    star 4
    Something I would like to point out is that there is a distinct difference between "education" and "schooling."

    Getting an education is not nearly as complicated as compulsary schooling makes it out to be. Given the opportunity to learn in his/her style, a person can learn to read, write and do math in less than 100 hours. If that is the case, then why does the US government mandate that children spend 12 years in school?

    The reason is an underlying control issue. What better way to control a poplulation than take the children away from the family and force them to spend their days in a ridgedly control institution?

    And what does this institution teach after the 100 hours of reading, writing, and math are over? It teaches these seven lessons, found in "Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling" by John Talor Gatto: (Note: While I'm getting the list of these lessons from this book, I bet most of us have experienced these things while in school)

    1. Confussion. In school students are expected to go to English class and study a piece of literature for 45 minutes, or however long a class period is and then move on to math and study algebra. The lessons in each class are taught seperatly as if completly unrelated. In reality life does not operate on 45 minute chunks of unrelated information. "Confussion is thrust upon kids by too many strange adults, each working alone with only the thinnest relationship with each other, pretending, for the most part, to an expertise they don't possess."

    2. Class Position. In school grades, class position, GPA, standardized test scores etc. are the sole "motivator." Students are constantly being assigned numbers without regard for the human being behind the numbers. These studnets are then placed groups base upon these numbers. Those with high numbers are in the "advanced" group. Those with middle range numbers are placed in the "average" group. Those with low numbers are placed in the "slow" group. But what about the person behind the numbers? This is a question that schooling does not answer and possibly even tries to repress.

    3. Indifference. This goes hand-in-hand with confussion. The unrelatedness of the information presented coupled with the "bell system" of having to drop everything that one is doing and move on to something else when ever a bell rings (Ringing bells and Pavlo's dogs) makes students feel that they just shouldn't bother. Why do something if you hve to move on to something else without finishing anything?

    4. Emotional dependancy. Think elementary school with stars, and other rewards and signs of the teachers approval. Once secondry schooling hits the "stars" aren't stickers any more; but rather grades and other examples of the teacher's approval. Students are taught to expect these rewards and work for them. In schooling a student's self-worth is determined by what the teacher thinks of them and what numbers he/she has earned.

    5. Intellecual dependancy. Schools require students to learn what someone else tells them to learn and to learn it an appointed time. Students are forced to wait for directions and all individual motivation is stiffled.

    6. Provisional self-esteem. I discussed this along with #4. Report cards and other evalutions are send home, and punishment or reward is given on the basis of an "expert opinion." In school a person's value is based on what this "expert" or teacher thinks.

    7. One can't hide. In schools there is no privacy, no time to develop as an individual. Everywhere a studnet goes he/she is being watched. In many schools, going to the bathroom is a privilage, issued or taken away on the basis of behavior. Have you or someone you know have ahd an accidnet in school because a teacher refused to let you use the restroom?

    I believe that schooling is not the way to get an education. Children should be educated in the home with all generations of the family participating. Lessons should be presented on the basis of real-life situations, and should come when the chi
  9. Fire_Ice_Death Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 15, 2001
    star 7
    Good points. Remember though, without school there would be no teachers. And thus being a teacher would be meaningless. So instead of thinking of the children. THINK OF THE TEACHERS!!!
  10. ADMIRALSPUZZUM Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Feb 13, 2002
    star 4
    I once remember hearing that an A in England is 75%. Where I live it's 86%. Does anybody know if that's correct?

    Yeah, and does anybody else wonder about homework? I mean, if we go to school, aren't we supposed to learn it there, not at home?
  11. leia393 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 24, 2001
    star 4
    "Remember though, without school there would be no teachers. And thus being a teacher would be meaningless. So instead of thinking of the children. THINK OF THE TEACHERS!!! "

    We all can be teachers. Everyone has something to share with others, maybe not in a formal classroom setting, though. But people can teach and share life experiences.
  12. Mastadge Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 4, 1999
    star 7
    Basically, the school system is training us two things:

    1) It's training us to be ideal workers, following orders without question and meeting deadlines, etc.

    2) It's training us not to question the system, by ingraining it into us as not only the way things should be, but as the only way things could possibly work.

    I don't have a problem with homework, for the most part. Homework is a chance to make sure that you understand the material on your own, out of the classroom setting. Useful homework, that is. There's nothing I hate worse than busywork; than work that teachers give simply beause they feel the need to give us work.
  13. Kit' Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 1999
    star 5
    There's nothing I hate worse than busywork; than work that teachers give simply beause they feel the need to give us work.

    I don't know about America, but I doubt that you'd find many of the younger teachers in Australia giving work for the sake of it. It often feels like that, but most of the time it is to reinforce something that you learnt in class.

    Being a student teacher has given me a whole new perspective on stuff that I complained about while in highschool! :p

    Kithera
  14. Coolguy4522 Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Dec 21, 2000
    star 4
    I have had enough busywork to know it when I see it. My favorite classes were those that generaly gave the most work, but it was work that was worth doing. The classes I hated were those that gave you work that was meaningless. Often times it was work that was given because a teacher was gone and it would be something you had done a long time ago, but there was no real reason to study it.
  15. Fire_Ice_Death Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 15, 2001
    star 7
    I don't have a problem with homework, for the most part. Homework is a chance to make sure that you understand the material on your own, out of the classroom setting. Useful homework, that is. There's nothing I hate worse than busywork; than work that teachers give simply beause they feel the need to give us work.

    Homework is busy work. It's stupid. And they give the answer "It's to review what you did during the day." well if they taught you well enough you'd friggin' know it, right? They must obviously not be sure of themselves.

    Oh, one thing. I did homework. I didn't enjoy it, but I did it. Studying is another thing. I didn't do it, and I passed every test they gave me.
  16. Kit' Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 1999
    star 5
    Homework is busy work. It's stupid. And they give the answer "It's to review what you did during the day." well if they taught you well enough you'd friggin' know it, right? They must obviously not be sure of themselves.


    No it isn't. Take it from someone who has been studying the affects of homework. Homework is not just 'busy work' it is there to make you review your facts and make sure tyhat you know what you are talking about rather then having some half-cocked idea that isn't correct. The more that you review your facts the more that you will remember stuff later on. Trust me on that one!

    Kithera
  17. ophelia Cards Against Humanity Host. Ex-Mod

    Game Host
    Member Since:
    Jun 25, 2002
    star 6
    This is part of a paper I wrote for a teachers' ed class.

    What Are Public Schools For?

    If public schools do not directly serve democracy's interests, it is fair to ask what we have them for. Until fairly recently, schools were seen as serving a specific and limited set of functions. But when traditional social supports such as the two-parent household, the stay-at-home mother, the local religious center and the close-knit neighborhood began to fall away, parents began to pin many--perhaps even all--of their hopes and dreams for their children upon the schools.

    The once-obvious barrier between schooling and parenting has broken down. Today's schools are expected to do everything from teach children the times table to feed them breakfast. Shaping behavior, finding suitable after-school activities, and preventing students from getting AIDS or killed in drunk driving accidents are all recognized functions of public schools. Whatever schools were for in the past, they are now for the same thing parents are "for:" raising the next generation.

    Many people see this trend as a terrible thing, evidence of parents' abdication of responsibility. It is certainly true that the typical school, whose operation is based on the assembly lines of Henry Ford, is a terrible medium in which to teach anything of interpersonal value. But we cannot turn back the clock and restore the communities of the 1950's. Instead, we must create new kinds of communities that reflect the way we live our lives now. An excellent way to start would be to depose Henry Ford's assembly line as the guiding spirit of our educational system.

    Removing the psychological and procedural barriers between schools and parents will not cause schools to usurp parents' roles, as many conservatives fear. Nor will accepting parents as equals destroy the teaching profession. Rather, parents and teachers will find their respective burdens lessened by accepting each other as allies.

    School Reform And Authentic Education

    The goal of returning education to the interpersonal sphere is to restore what was once a natural process of learning through immersion in authentic community activities and relationships.

    *********

    It went on from there, but that's the crux of the argument.
  18. Jarik Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 21, 2000
    star 4
    "I have seen that many people who I communicate with over the internet know they are not using correct grammar or punctuation, but just do not care."

    I don't see this as a problem at all. When you talk with people you don't use proper grammar either. When they write papers I'm sure they use correct grammar, but if they're just chatting with a friend who cares?

    "Have you or someone you know have ahd an accidnet in school because a teacher refused to let you use the restroom?"

    Actually I've heard a story about someone that this happened to. I don't get it. If I had to go that bad and the teacher wouldn't let me leave I'd just get up and go. And what's the teacher going to do about it? Sure you'll have problems to deal with later, but he/she can't stop you from getting up and walking to the bathroom. At least mine can't, most of them are woman that are smaller than me. 8-}

    "I once remember hearing that an A in England is 75%. Where I live it's 86%. Does anybody know if that's correct?"

    An A for me here in America is a 93%, but I go to a private school, so I don't know.

    "Yeah, and does anybody else wonder about homework? I mean, if we go to school, aren't we supposed to learn it there, not at home?"

    Homeworks fine as long as it is not busywork, which just makes me incredibly upset. Teachers should not assign work just for the sake of assigning work. I really think some give work just so they can tell the principal, "Oh yea, I did my job, they have to copy the definitiopns on page 7 into their notebook." Why the hell should I transfer something from 1 book to another. If somehow I don't manage to finish stupid work like this before the teacher is done lecturing about nothing I use my scanner and printer at home. I even had one teacher who gave us maps to color. I was a junior in high school and you couldn't get an A unless your map was colored and looked pretty. I still have not understood why. I had one teacher who gave a lot of work, but I had no problem with it cause it was spread out all right and it was good work. We had 2 papers due a week, but it was stuff you had to think about, research a little make a decision on and then back it up with facts. He never gave busy work, well rarely, but it wasn't his fault, he had to use laptops the school required us all to have so we got stupid powerpoint projects sometimes too. This is stupid too, the school makes us pay 2000 bucks for laptops then realizes we barely usethem for anything except video games during the stupidly easy throwaway classes, so they start giving us a bunch of stupid busywork and require qe use programs like powerpoint whenit would be easier not to. Its so stupid.

    I'm taking this class now Business Law. I wanted to take Computer Science, but it conflicted with A.P. Stats, so I'm doing the work for Computer Science, I just won't get a grade, don't go to the class, and officially have nothing to do with it. I'm in mostly all honors and accelerated course and AP's, which are college equivilant courses. There's only a few classes I have really had to work at in high scool: Spanish, Analysis, Calculus, AP History I have to do work but it's easy, geometry, and everything else is like throwaway.

    But anyway this Business Law teacher didn't do anything the whole week. Monday she wrote homework for the whole week up on the board, stupis busy work that I did pretty much all of the following period in study hall. I did the whole week's work in 1 40 min. time slot and I spent 10 of those min. downstairs talking to a teacher about something. Then Tuesday - Thursday we do nothing in her class except sit around and talk and finish up the week's homework. Then we discover that somebody complained that we had too much work in that class and so the teacher comes in and is like. I'm sorry, I didn't mean to scare you. I don't want anybody to be scared to come into my room. And so she basically tells us what the test on Monday is going to look like, like it wasn't already amazingly easy.

    "I have had enough bus
  19. Fire_Ice_Death Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 15, 2001
    star 7
    No it isn't. Take it from someone who has been studying the affects of homework. Homework is not just 'busy work' it is there to make you review your facts and make sure tyhat you know what you are talking about rather then having some half-cocked idea that isn't correct. The more that you review your facts the more that you will remember stuff later on. Trust me on that one!


    Doubtful. If kids weren't so stupid and partcipated in class and took notes and even knew what they were talking about, there would be no need for homework. Oh and I'm not going 'take your word for it'. Why? Because homework has no justifiable purpose. Despite what you said, it doesn't. If you can't learn it within the time span of a class, you're not going to. Also, another thing. What if you're in a class that doesn't have homework? What? *gasp* Yeah, a class that doesn't require you to do homework. There are classes like that. What do you do then? Like my Graphic class. No homework. The class was 90 minutes long. We had to memorize a lot of stuff, color theory, how to run a camera, operate a dark room, use the quick and dirty, use a press, burn a plate, how to make business cards, etc. etc. yet amazingly everyone in that class got an A without doing a single piece of homework. And most of the people I talked to who were in my class still remember all of what was taught. Amazing, a class without homework and they memorize it.

    I think it's the way some teachers teach. Contrary to what I said before. Some are actually horrible. And some of it is the material. I've had horrible math teachers my whole life with the exception of 3. And that's 15 years of school we're talking about. And I STILL do not know my multplication table and I do not know how to divide properly because of that. I kid you not. I'm 20 and cannot do that without a calculator. It's sad, and I have no problem with admitting weakness. My teachers, they simply did not like to teach. They did not like to teach math, I should say. They did however LOVE english.

    I'm good with words. These actually have a practical application to them. Math, in the scheme of things, does not. Unless you're in a profession that requires that. Other than that, it's BS. I don't get numbers. They're beyond me. Algebra, Calculus, trigonomotry, these things have no practical applications. When I'm driving down the street, I'm not gonna be worried "Well if x is me, and y is the car. And there's 5 feet between us, how much do you think my insurance will be after I hit him?" So I didn't bother with math. Neither did my teachers, apparently. Oh they taught it.

    They stood in front of the room with their droning voice, you know that voice that shows they've been defeated by life? That voice:

    "Class, turn your books to page 230-250 and do all of the problems."

    All the while I'm like

    "Shut the hell up lady, just teach us the work!"

    And that was that. The books were even worse than the teacher! How the *%(# could a MATH book be worse than the teacher? By not explaining it thoroughly enough. I cannot get through ONE page of my psych book because it reads just like those math books. It doesn't make you wanna have the initiative to learn it.

    It's like "We are the bored, entertainment is futile."

    That's why kids hate school, they don't give you the desire to want this stuff taught to you. I'll bet you if they made school half as interesting as stuff on TV, you'd see a higher rate of graduates and a low lower rate of drop-outs.


    Back to my original reply, homework is busy work. And that's the proof right there. If you give these kids books that are too boring to read, you're going to lose their interest. If you give them assignments that have ridged standards such as a persuasive essay where you have to look up the facts. You're going to lose their interest.

    My english comp class has taught me a lot. There is a much looser form to writing than the ridged crap they tell you to do. See? I learned that, didn't I? ;)

  20. Kuna_Tiori Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 20, 2002
    star 4
    I agree that the education system is somewhat lacking, although the school I attend is generally regarded as an excellent one.

    But the thing is, how do we improve? As is with so many things in life, the current school system is the "least suckiest answer" to the problem of education, not the best. Yes, we can complain, but honest to Anakin I can't think of anything better.

    leia393
    Children should be educated in the home with all generations of the family participating.

    I TOTALLY disagree. Meet my parents and you'll see why. ;)

    And my relatives aren't that much better. I think teachers are best qualified for teaching (some of them anyway).


    And yes, I think that most students don't give a durn about the actual thing they're studying, but just walk about like mindless automatons, blindly pursuing the coveted A without a thought to where they're going and what they really want from life. Everything is too superficial and grade-driven.

    And again the question...what should it be like instead?

    Fire_Ice_Death:
    I'm good with words. These actually have a practical application to them. Math, in the scheme of things, does not. Unless you're in a profession that requires that. Other than that, it's BS. I don't get numbers. They're beyond me. Algebra, Calculus, trigonomotry, these things have no practical applications.

    Many complain that they hate having to take classes that they think is useless and won't have anything to do with their career. Well, what if it will have something to do with their career? Is everyone supposed to pick their major when they enter high school?
  21. Fire_Ice_Death Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 15, 2001
    star 7
    Totally. At least that would prepare them for college.
  22. Mastadge Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 4, 1999
    star 7
    Because homework has no justifiable purpose. Despite what you said, it doesn't. If you can't learn it within the time span of a class, you're not going to.

    I disagree. In class they try to teach you the methods. The homework is to see if you can actually apply them. In addition, stuff really sinks into your head when you're sleeping. If you have a class at the beginning of the day, then go through other classes all day, go home brainfried, the next day chances are you won't have a real firm recollection of what you've learned. If you have homework to do, you have to think about your lessons again later in the day, so they're still "on the top of your mind" when you go to sleep. The later use, as well as the repetition, help to plant the material in your mind more firmly. Also, there have been many times where I've "gotten" a concept in class, only to get home, open to the homework, and realize I have no idea what I'm doing. Only then do I sit down, actually learn the material, and know it. So, homework is not about learning the lesson. It's about application of the lessons already learned, and it's about reinforcement of those lessons through repetition.

    Of course, obviously some people will find it a waste of time. 95% of the time, I know something as well as I ever will the first time I hear or read it, and therefore going over it again is a complete waste of time for me. And those who are strong in math will probably find most math homework extraneous, etc. And then there's always the dreaded busywork which doesn't serve any purpose other than to let the teacher fulfill his or her "obligation" to give homework. But for the most part homework is not pointless.
  23. Aurra_Sting Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jun 19, 2002
    star 1
    Leia393: You make some excellent points. That book is now on my list of books that I want to read. I don't think that compulsory education is completely for the sake of teaching those 7 lessons, and I think that some are necessary, since most students are just going to move on to a job where they're forced to do the same kind of mindless drone work that they were taught to do in high school. It definitely is something to think about though. I've always been appalled at the idea of having to ask to go to the bathroom. It's about the most degrading thing you can force a person to do.

    Homework is busy work. It's stupid. And they give the answer "It's to review what you did during the day." well if they taught you well enough you'd friggin' know it, right? They must obviously not be sure of themselves.

    Homework to me has always been subjective. I've had classes where I loved it and classes where I could not stand it. If a teacher actually fills the class time doing labs, or having debates or something and actually runs out of time, I think homework makes sense. I had a biology class where we had quite a bit of homework. It was understandable, though, because we could devote entire class periods to working in the lab with the ideas we had been studying the night before.

    On the other hand, I had other teachers that spent entire class periods with their back to the room, writing out lengthy equations without ever asking the class to participate or asking questions. Half of us slept the whole time and he never even noticed. Then he would give us two pages of homework every night. Homework in cases like that is completely worthless.

    I have seen that many people who I communicate with over the internet know they are not using correct grammar or punctuation, but just do not care.

    I agree with you here. I can understand horrible grammar, punctuation, and spelling in a chat room, but when writing e-mails or messages on a message board it just shows lack of thought. If you can preview a message that you've written and knowingly pick out errors, it's not going to kill you to fix it.
  24. Kit' Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 1999
    star 5
    Doubtful. If kids weren't so stupid and partcipated in class and took notes and even knew what they were talking about, there would be no need for homework. Oh and I'm not going 'take your word for it'. Why? Because homework has no justifiable purpose.

    Ahhh. So just because you say so it has to be right? [face_plain]


    I'm a student teacher. I study the affects that homework has on students everyday. I read about it in everything I do. I have entire subjects devoted to it. And you know what? I've seen it work. I've seen it work in the classrooms too. There is a marked difference in classroom performance from the days when teachers set homework and the days they don't. Kids perform better if their teacher has set homework on whatever they were supposed to learn in that day. The next day they actually remember what they were doing and can go on and learn without the teacher having to spend 45 minutes repeating to them what she/he taught them the day before.

    That's why kids hate school, they don't give you the desire to want this stuff taught to you. I'll bet you if they made school half as interesting as stuff on TV, you'd see a higher rate of graduates and a low lower rate of drop-outs.

    When did it become the teachers responsibility to keep YOU entertained? Why is it their responsibility that YOU can't keep yourself entertained or take learning into your own hands if YOU are bored? Why is it the teacher's responsibility to keep YOU happy and well-contented?

    Have you ever sat and thought what it would be like to be a teacher? What they have to put up with? What it must be like for them if they had to teach 5 different grades everyday, all day for weeks on end? Now imagine how much work it must take to keep all the kids stimulated and happy - in your words to keep them as interested as if they were watching tv. It would be impossible. Absolutely impossible to keep everyone entertained and to still teach the cirriculum. The thing is, even once you got passed the fact that the teacher has to set up her daily sheet of what she has to teach, work out activities for each class and then teach them let alone mark thousands of assignments and tests every year - you still have the problem of entertaining them. Kids are entertained by different things, just like the fact that kids learn in different ways - teachers already have to work around the fact there are different learning styles to make sure every kid is taught correctly - they then can't be expected to cater for what everyone considers entertainment.... [face_plain]

    I had a situation in highschool where we had a teacher who just gave a lecture everyday. 60 minutes of non-stop talking and she was so faint we could hardly hear her. She gave no homework, frequently went off on tangents and wouldn't help anyone else out. You know what we did? We set up study lessons in the library for our class. We taught each other because we wanted to pass and pass we did. We didn't get as high marks as we would have liked but we didn't make out like it was the teacher's fault if we failed either. Maybe we were just odd students, I don't know, I just have never felt that it was the teachers fault if I failed something but rather my own for not learning it.

    As for you making lower drop out rates if it school was made interesting. Let me tell you it wouldn't. There are kids out there who are just adverse to learning, in fact they are adverse to having to do something that they are told to. If a teacher made school interesting as the stuff on TV it wouldn't stop these kids from hating school or trying to drop out. It would just make more work for the already overstressed teachers and make their job of controling the out-of-control kids harder while trying to entertain someone.

    Rant mode off

    Kithera
  25. Kuna_Tiori Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 20, 2002
    star 4
    Fire_Ice_Death:
    Totally. At least that would prepare them for college.

    Well, a lot people aren't sure what they want to do with their lives even when they're in college. I don't think they could make that decision when they're going into high school. Or even worse, they'll let their parents decide for them.
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