Lit [Fantasy Flight Games] Because it just keeps getting better

Discussion in 'Literature' started by The Loyal Imperial, Sep 7, 2012.

  1. JediBatman Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 3, 2015
    star 3
    If you want the answers, someone took a picture of a promotional display: https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1776542/expansion-few-additional-bits-and-pieces-info

    Also I found the Rebel units sheet to complement the Imperial one:

    [IMG]

    Oh yeah, the rules can be a bit intimidating (and there's some little details we got wrong for our first games), but IMO it's a rewarding experience. Have fun!
    AdmiralNick22 likes this.
  2. Iron_lord Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 8
    Scum Aces preview:

    https://www.fantasyflightgames.com/en/news/2017/7/24/starviper-mk-ii/

    Interestingly, FFG are putting characters who first appeared in FFG Star Wars roleplaying game books into X-Wing Miniatures ships. So, we've had Legends characters, we've had newcanon characters, and now we're getting "FFG-verse only" characters - that is, if some haven't turned up already.
    Last edited by Iron_lord, Jul 25, 2017
  3. Darth_Henning Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 1, 2007
    star 4
    Star Viper Mach II seems much like Whisper when the Tie Phantom came out. Complex maneuverability options that let you go more places. Will be interesting to see how it affects the Meta and if it will similarly require subsequent nerfs.
  4. Iron_lord Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 8
    Echo actually. Whisper just gets extra focus tokens for hitting targets.
    TheRedBlade likes this.
  5. Ender Sai Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 18, 2001
    star 10
    https://www.fantasyflightgames.com/en/news/2017/7/26/scour-the-streets-of-coruscant/

    [IMG]

    Spending 2 strain to damage up to 9 squares with 1 dmg could be really, really powerful. Especially if the rubble token makes terrain "difficult".

    [IMG]

    Deploying J4X-7 for a free Pierce 1 rating? Not bad, but the Imperial player will just target and destroy Jax as oon as they can. Unclear if Jax can be respawned often at the cost of 2 strain.

    [IMG]

    Meh. You're usually on the clock so the Stockpile mechanic of crate pickup goodness is probably not that valuable. But, arms Distribution could be good for the one free damage reduction result.
    TheRedBlade and Gamiel like this.
  6. JediBatman Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 3, 2015
    star 3
    Another week's end, another update on Rise of the Empire: https://www.fantasyflightgames.com/en/news/2017/7/28/sw-stay-on-target/

    First, we get info on the two new leader rings:
    [IMG] [IMG]

    As K2 was my favorite character in Rogue One, I was kind of bummed he wasn't a leader, but if R2 and 3PO were rings, it makes sense to make the other droid character a ring as well.

    Then we get to the target markers.

    [IMG]

    Target markers change the game state and offer special benefits. For example, the mission " Secure the Plans " lets you put it's marker in a remote system, and while the marker is there the Rebels can't use the Death Star Plans to blow it up. It sounds like to remove this and other markers, you have to land a ground unit on the planet and remove any enemy ground units. I forsee crafty Imperial players using the Shield Bunker to deploy a bunch of AT-ATs to a remote system in order to keep the Death Star Plans firmly locked down.

    The other target markers are related to Rebel objectives:
    [IMG][IMG]

    I see a lot of potential for the Rebel Cell marker, the article suggests using it to lure the Empire away from your Rebel Base.

    So that covers all the target markers pictured, but it leaves us with a mystery: What is the purpose of the leftmost marker showing the Rebel Fleet attacking the Death Star?
  7. AdmiralNick22 Fleet Admiral of Literature

    Manager
    Member Since:
    May 28, 2003
    star 6
    I'm addicted to FFG's Rebellion board game. I visited my brother in Sacramento this weekend, where it was hotter than Mustafar. Since we were mostly indoors and his wife was out of town on work, we decided to make it a board game/pizza/alcohol weekend. :p

    Anyways, we kept alternating sides and regardless the Rebellion won. I used to think that the game was damned near impossible to win as the Alliance, but once you get a hang for it things feel different. I love the balance that FFG put into the game. As a Rebel, my ships and troops are limited and outgunned. As the Empire, my resources are more than I need to control the whole board. However, the Alliance player doesn't win by conquering territory, they win by surviving, executing key strikes, and getting worlds on their side.

    For those of you who don't have the game, there are 14 turns (or less) that the Rebel player has to survive. If they do, they win as the Galaxy goes into open rebellion. FFG's take is similar to the new canon, plus it is possible to win a lot quicker if you are successful on some objective cards (destroying an ISD or SSD, gaining support in an entire region, having forces on multiple worlds, etc).

    In my last game as the Empire, I had two operational Death Stars, two SSD's, and a host of other forces. However, time isn't on my side. The galaxy is bigger than it looks, plus the Rebels can move their base.

    We loved Rebellion so much this weekend that we didn't even bother to play Armada. Which bummed me a bit, as I'm dying to try out my new Hammerhead corvettes. :p

    --Adm. Nick
    Sinrebirth and JediBatman like this.
  8. Ender Sai Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 18, 2001
    star 10
    https://www.fantasyflightgames.com/en/news/2017/7/31/gm-guide-the-heros-journey/

    [IMG]

    "The belonging you seek is not behind you. It is ahead. I am no Jedi, but I know the Force."
    –Maz Kanata

    There's no more immersive experience of the Star Wars universe than that provided by any or all of the three different Fantasy Flight Games Star Wars™ roleplaying systems — Age of Rebellion, Edge of the Empire, and Force and Destiny.
    All three systems allow you and your friends to share thrilling adventures in the Star Wars universe, and all three utilize the same dice and core mechanics. Moreover, you can dive quickly into any of these game lines by starting with its Beginner Game. Regardless of the line, a Star Wars Roleplaying Beginner Game offers a unique and memorable take on the coreStar Wars experience, allowing players and Game Masters to learn the game even as they play.
    But where do you go from your Beginner Game? Perhaps you have a fantastic series of Star Wars adventures racing through your mind, and you want to share them with your friends. How can you use the game's narrative dice as part of your effort?
    Today, guest writer Bryan Young draws upon his experience as a Star Wars roleplaying Game Master in order to help you make the dice your ally.
    [IMG]
    Guest Writer Bryan Young on Using the Power of the Dice

    There are a lot of newer Star Wars gamers who opened up their Star Wars™ Roleplaying Beginner Games, ran the box's well-structured game, and are now looking to make their next game even better.
    As you make your way on that journey from gaming Padawan to Master, having adventures of your own in the Star Wars universe, one of the most important things you can learn to improve your gaming experience is to focus on the stories you can tell using the dice.
    The Star Wars Roleplaying Games from Fantasy Flight Games are unique from any other game I’ve played. With them, you can have wonderful things happen in tandem with otherwise unsuccessful rolls, but you can also have horrible things happen when you’ve clearly aced a task.
    [IMG]
    What happens when our heroes successfully convince a crime lord's henchmen to lead them to a secret weapons depot (success and Triumph)—only to find it more heavily guarded than they expected (Threat)?
    This apparent contradiction lends itself to the sort of high-adventure storytelling of Star Wars movies, but can be a little difficult for players to get used to. The system asks a lot from the players, but it can create some of the most fun story moments you’ve ever had in a game.
    What Stories Will Your Dice Tell?

    If your group has players accustomed to other games, it might be difficult to get them to participate in telling stories with the dice, but once you do, you’re going to have a much more collaborative and fun game. Think about all the great moments in Star Wars movies where something good and bad happened at the same time and it helped tell a much more thrilling story.
    A really great way to get your players accustomed to this is by offering all sorts of examples you’d find acceptable in play.
    One of my favorite moments involved a starfighter battle in an asteroid field. One of my players was chasing a TIE fighter through the asteroids, dodging around back and forth, and rolled to shoot the TIE. Naturally, the difficulty of hitting the TIE fighter was really high, and my player missed the shot. But it still yielded a Triumph result. That’s when my player offered that the stray shot hit an asteroid and altered its trajectory… and that asteroid hit another—right into the TIE fighter!
    [IMG]
    There are many other ways to use your dice results. Fail that stealth roll but got a Triumph? Maybe the guard took a break to go to the refresher station so your stealthiness doesn’t matter. Or imagine that your players are rolling for their hyperspace navigation and score a bunch of Advantage, even as they fail what they want to do; maybe they manage to come out of hyperspace early, realizing that if they’d have done what they intended, they'd have fallen into a trap.
    On the other side of the token, what if your player rolls a success along with a significant amount of Threat? Maybe she manages to blast the stormtrooper as which she's aiming at, and he’s knocked forward into the console he’s guarding, opening the blast door behind him.
    Another of my favorite game moments happened when one of my players was shooting at a stormtrooper in the rafters. The player rolled enough Threat that the shot missed the trooper, but hit the rigging that kept a TIE fighter attached to the hangar ceiling. The TIE came crashing down, pinning the players in their position and made the rest of their job a lot more difficult.
    These scenarios increase the tension of the situation, sure, and you, as the Game Master, will have to decide what’s appropriate. Some players might not be ready to add too much danger to their games, so you must also make sure they have the tools they need to have fun.
    [IMG]
    Know Your Role

    With FFG's Star Wars Roleplaying Games and the narrative dice system, it’s not just the Game Master who adds to the twists in your story, but it’s important that it's clear the Game Master does have the ultimate say in what is permissible.
    It’s also a lot more fun to use the dice to help turn the story on its ear than to use them to add simple bonuses. Being a Game Master who works with the players toward roleplaying of this sort ensures that your sessions are more about storytelling than being a slave to the numbers of the rules. And in my opinion, it creates a much more rewarding style of play.
    Work with your players to get more creative in your use of the dice, and I guarantee you’ll have more fun gaming!
    When he's not making life difficult for his friends' small band of Rebels, Bryan Young is a writer, podcaster, and gamer. He writes regularly for StarWars.com and Star Wars Insider, and hosts the Star Wars podcast Full of Sith. You can follow him on Twitter @Swankmotron.
  9. my kind of scum Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2002
    star 4
    So, has anyone played Star Wars Destiny yet? We were on a family camping vacation that got rained out and ended up being a family hotel vacation. Hit a local games store for something to do in the room. We were looking for something easy-ish (my daughter is seven) but complicated enough to remain fun. I have to say that I was really surprised by how good/fun this game is. I hadn't paid any attention to it before. My seven year old was able to pick it up really quickly (though some of the strategy will take some time to learn...) but we are still finding new elements even to the starter game a week later. There aren't any stores within a hundred miles of me that carry the boosters, which is probably a good thing at this point (easier for me to talk myself out of online orders...). If you haven't tried it, I definitely recommend it. It definitely fits in that "moments to learn, a lifetime to master" type of game.
  10. The Ganner Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jan 20, 2015
    star 1
    I Really like the FFG stuff, and like how you can use rules from the WEG and WOTC games, but im having trouble getting a game started, as i dont think I know anyone who likes Star Wars as much as I do, are there online games?
  11. Ender Sai Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 18, 2001
    star 10
    you cannot incorporate WEG or WOTC rules.

    @Lord Vivec, you've played Destiny yeah?
    Lord Vivec likes this.
  12. Lord Vivec Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 17, 2006
    star 8
    Definitely

    I've got your standard villain deck with Kylo maining while I'm trying to get a freaking IG-88 deck going.
    my kind of scum and Ender Sai like this.
  13. Ender Sai Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 18, 2001
    star 10
  14. AdmiralNick22 Fleet Admiral of Literature

    Manager
    Member Since:
    May 28, 2003
    star 6
    Hmm. Earlier this week, FFG's website said that the Rebel and Imperial fighter expansions for Armada were back in stores. Yet I can't find them on Miniature Market or any other site. Anyone have any good online links to buy some? I'd love to pick up another pack of each as the fighters are harder to come by.

    --Adm. Nick
  15. AdmiralWesJanson Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 23, 2005
    star 5
  16. Sarchet Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jan 23, 2016
    star 1
    Set 1, but that just means stores have gotten them. The online retailers will probably take a bit longer to get them up because they have to inventory them before updating the site. I'd give it a week or so until they show back up in force.
  17. Hamburger_Time Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Dec 13, 2010
    star 1
    So I'm told this game actually resolved the Bardottan-Phuii discrepancy (namely, Phuii are Bardottans from Phu, much like New Yorkers are Americans from New York)? Glad to hear this; inconsistencies with aliens are my bugbear for some reason.
  18. Noash_Retrac Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2006
    star 4

    I always considered the Phuii to be an offshoot of the Bardotta who settled on Phu centuries before the Clone Wars and developed a more open society then the Bardottans of their mother world (thus explains Ares Nune being a Jedi).
  19. Ender Sai Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 18, 2001
    star 10
    They would only give their opinion on a matter and have it approved by LFL. Please don't look to FFG for canon-status confirmations.
  20. Barriss_Coffee Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 29, 2003
    star 6
    ...isn't that what we'd want? Some sort of resolution?
  21. AdmiralNick22 Fleet Admiral of Literature

    Manager
    Member Since:
    May 28, 2003
    star 6
    Huh, Miniature Market typically shows them being available almost immediately. I'll keep an eye out, those sets have been out of stock for long enough to justify buying another pack of each.

    --Adm. Nick
  22. Ender Sai Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 18, 2001
    star 10


    All that you get from the books is that FFG have opined for the purposes of the RPG only, and not in a wider canonicity context. So that the book, even with LFL approved, gives the apperance of a resolution does not guarantee, in and of itself, an actual resolution.

    in other words, stop looking to FFG for in-universe answers.
  23. Barriss_Coffee Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 29, 2003
    star 6
    Ok I thought you meant "approved" as in "LFL approves it's canon", like Story Group or whatever they call themselves these days declaring from on high "yes, the Phuii shall pass the gates of canon".

    TBH I'm sort of the Joker mindset here and would love if they just start canonizing FFG stuff willy-nilly. That tree on Arbooine is canon, but Arbooine is not canon. But this is why I'm not in charge of things. Alas.
    Darth_Duck likes this.
  24. AdmiralNick22 Fleet Admiral of Literature

    Manager
    Member Since:
    May 28, 2003
    star 6
    The cool thing is that there is a precedent (albeit a small one) for LFL using an FFG creation and making it canon. The Imperial Raider-class corvette being a prime example. Afterall, there is no reason to assume that the developers of the new canon aren't also fans of RPG's/FFG. So who knows, we may suddenly see another FFG creation work its way into canon at one point.

    --Adm. Nick
  25. AdmiralNick22 Fleet Admiral of Literature

    Manager
    Member Since:
    May 28, 2003
    star 6
    The good people at Miniature Market have the Rebel & Imperial fighter packs back in stock! I just picked up another pair, I'm really trying to give myself and my fellow players a lot of variables. Specifically, I'm excited to mass large formations of B-wings and Y-wings. :D

    Also- FFG posted an updated on Rebellion:

    "Your father… He said I could get right by myself. He said I could make it right, if I was brave enough and listened to what was in my heart."
    –Bodhi Rook to Jyn Erso

    In Star Wars™: Rebellion, your main characters—your leaders—are defined largely by their names, art, skill icons, and tactic values. At least, these are the aspects of your leaders that you and your opponent can see on the table, and they speak to your leaders' potential as they sit atop unrevealed mission cards or lurk within your leader pool, waiting for the right moment to thwart an enemy's mission or lead your fleet to battle.
    But the Star Wars films are full of heroes who surprise us by rising to the challenges they face, and they're full of villains who surprise us with their depth, cunning, or cruelty. The movies force characters into situations that leave us room to be surprised, and we find stunning instances of courage and compassion and betrayal.
    Similarly, the leaders of Star Wars: Rebellion—and the new Rise of the Empire expansion—can surprise us with their hidden depths. There's more to these characters than you can find on their standees. You'll also find them given life by the missions with which they're associated, and you'll find their unique talents represented by their action cards.
    [IMG]
    Make a Fresh Start

    In Star Wars: Rebellion, you start the game with four leaders. As the game progresses, however, your leader pool will change. It's possible that your leader pool might shrink as some Rebel leaders are captured and frozen in carbonite or turned to the dark side, or as an Imperial leader is defeated in an epic Confrontation .
    However, it's more common for your leader pool to grow—at least as the game moves through its early stages and both sides are focused on amassing their forces for the battles to come. At the end of several predetermined rounds, both the Rebels and Imperials are able to recruit new leaders and add them to their leader pools.
    Whenever you have the chance to recruit a leader, you draw two action cards and can select any one of the leaders shown on those cards. You can then take the selected leader from your supply and add him or her to your leader pool. And the action card's text then reinforces that leader's impact on the game by introducing a unique effect.
    Some of those effects are Immediate, meaning they're resolved as soon as you add the leader to your pool. This is the case with such action cards as Saw Gererra's Rebel Extremist card, Cassian Andor's He Means Well , and Director Krennic's card, Lord Vader's Orders .
    [IMG] [IMG] [IMG]
    These abilities tend to reflect aspects of the character inherent in his or her background. Their impact can be significant, but they tend to be less surprising. After all, they arrive to the table between periods of activity, rather than in the heat of combat.
    Other action cards, like Trust in the Force , play during the Assignment phase and present new ways to make use of your leaders. Since they fall outside the standard back-and-forth of the game's standard framework, these abilities may be somewhat surprising, but when you're using a leader like Jyn Erso or Chirrut Îmwe to trigger your action card's effect, that leader is no longer able to attempt a mission, oppose a mission, or move your fleet.
    In the end, you trade one surprise for another, and you'll need to make your decision whether to trigger the action card or assign the leader to another task based upon the information available.
    Other abilities, however, are marked by the Special or Start of Combat keywords, allowing you a whole range of options to lay traps or avoid them, to win combats, or to place bounties upon the enemy leaders who have thwarted your ambitions.
    These action cards generally require a little more effort to trigger since you need to have the matching leader in the right place at the right time, but the effects of action cards like Post Bounty and Baze's Loyalty are well worth the effort.
    [IMG]
    Similarly, Special action cards like Something to Fight For and Ambitions of Power can change the game at critical moments—even if they don't directly interfere with your opponent's plans. If Jyn Erso participates in a winning combat, she can play Something to Fight For to reclaim an objective that you've already scored and will be certain to score again. And given how important your leaders are to the whole of your strategy, a card like Ambitions of Power can make a huge difference in the number of systems your Imperials can subjugate in any given round.
    No matter the type of effect, though, you need the matching leader to play an action card, and that means your actions are always rooted in the personal narratives and cinematic dramas that evolve over the course of your games.
    Well, almost always…
    Full of Surprises

    If an action card has a leader icon on it, you need that leader in the appropriate situation at the appropriate time in order to play it. And in the core game, every action card either had a leader or an attachment ring to which it was keyed.
    In Rise of the Empire, however, this changes. Each side gains a single action card that doesn't require a specific leader.
    The Rebels gain False Orders , which can be played at the end of the assignment phase. It reads, "Choose 1 Imperial leader that is on a mission by itself. Return that leader to the leader pool and return its mission card to the Imperial player’s hand."
    Since you play False Orders at the end of the assignment phase, the Imperials are, therefore, prevented from both attempting the mission to which they had assigned the leader and from using that leader to attempt a mission. The leader can still oppose your mission or direct fleet movement, but there are times you'll gladly allow those possibilities in order to deny a mission.
    For example, if you draw False Orders early in the game, when the Imperials are likely to send Darth Vader to Capture Rebel Operatives , you might return Darth Vader to the leader pool in order to prevent him from capturing Jyn Erso as she goes on a Heist to remove the target marker that is preventing your ships from using their Death Star Plans to destroy the Death Star.
    [IMG]
    When the Rebels suspect that Darth Vader intends to hunt down Jyn Erso and capture her during her mission on Nal Hutta, they can use False Orders to return his mission to the Imperial player's hand and return Vader to the leader pool.
    Darth Vader would then be available to oppose Jyn, but since he doesn't have any intel icons, he wouldn't roll any dice. Jyn would only have to roll a single success.
    Alternatively, you might play the card at a time you fear a dramatic, game-changing play. Perhaps you suspect the Emperor intends to use Lure of the Dark Side to convert a captive Saw Gererra to the Imperial cause. If so, your False Orders could serve as a distraction, allowing you an additional round to free Saw Gererra before he caves into temptation.
    The Imperials, however, are not to be outdone, and they gain a powerful, predatory ability to counter the Rebellion's elusive stall tactics. Track Them is playable whenever a Rebel unit retreats from combat, and it allows you to choose an Imperial leader in the combat's system and return it to your leader pool.
    At its very minimum, then, Track Them effectively grants you the use of an "extra" leader to oppose enemy missions or move your fleet. You might be able to pull Director Krennic back from a combat to oppose the Rebellion's Reconnaissance . Or you might recover the use of Admiral Piett and send him, fresh from one victorious space combat, to lead another fleet to battle.
    More than this, if Admiral Piett was your only leader in the battle he just won, Track Them would allow you to use Piett to pursue the retreating Rebels. While you cannot normally move a fleet twice, this is only because you cannot move your fleet away from a system in which you've placed your leader. Once Piett has returned to your pool, if there's no other leader in that system, the fleet is free to continue its pursuit—and complete destruction—of the Rebels!
    [IMG]
    After the Rebels retreat from Admiral Piett's forces at Utapau, the Imperials play Track Them to return Piett to their leader pool, meaning he can then pursue the Rebels to Dagobah.
    Scour the Galaxy

    Even as the new action cards from Rise of the Empire provide us with a greater sense of the characters they enhance and surprising new tactics, they reinforce the ways your leaders involve themselves in the larger Galactic Civil War.
    After all, whether you play Rebellion as an Imperial or a Rebel, you have a goal, and that goal is in some way related to the Empire's search for the Rebel base. As the Imperial player, you want to find the base as quickly as possible, probing system after system for signs of Rebel activity, so that you can destroy the base and the Rebellion in one fell swoop. As the Rebels, you want to elude the Empire's detection and hinder Imperial search efforts wherever possible.
    Either way, the game brings this hunt to life as the Imperials move their fleets from system to system—and through the use of the probe deck.
    When you're the Imperial player, the probe deck helps you narrow down your search. Each system you draw from the probe deck is a system that doesn't house the Rebel base. And since the Rebels don't know which cards you're holding—and which systems you've probed—the probe deck provides you a bit of hidden information that you can use to power your bluffs or lure the Rebels into your traps.
    However, in the core game, the cards, themselves, do very little once you've drawn them. And this leads to one of the opportunities that Director Krennic and Krennic's Finest can exploit in Rise of the Empire.
    These leaders come with a pair of new action cards that allow you to put your probe cards to new uses.
    Secret Facility allows you to place one of your probe cards facedown beneath it, then reveal that probe card later to gain an assault tank or Stormtrooper unit along with a shield bunker. And you can then use these new Imperial units to lead your surprise assault against the Rebels who just stumbled into the system. You don't even need Director Krennic or Krennic's Finest to be there. In fact, you don't need any leader at all. The card's effect is triggered—and your trap is set—as soon as you recruit Krennic or his Finest. From then on, it's up to you whether or not you spring the trap.
    [IMG]
    The Rebel troopers deployed to Bespin find themselves in for a cruel surprise when they stumble across Director Krennic's Secret Facility.
    Similarly, Sweep the Area triggers Immediately whenever you recruit Krennic's Finest and requires that you place a probe card facedown beneath it. Instead of triggering the production of new units and the initiation of a combat, however, the card allows you to capture a Rebel leader. Whenever you spy a Rebel leader in the system associated with the action, you can reveal your probe card to capture that leader and move it to the closest system that has an Imperial unit.
    These powerful effects help the Empire maximize its use of probe cards, but the Imperials aren't the only one to benefit from action cards that relate to the probe deck. The Rebels gain their own set of tricks with Under the Radar , which allows them to steal a probe card from the top four of the probe deck. Not only can they steal the one probe card, but they can manipulate the other three they viewed, placing them on the top or bottom of the probe deck as they see fit.
    The result is that Under the Radar allows the Rebels to create a new degree of uncertainty. Now there are two systems the probes will never find. And only one of them is the Rebel base. If you're lucky, as the Rebel player, you might be able to create a tension that leaves the Empire torn between two possible bases—at opposite sides of the galaxy.
    And there's even one more benefit hidden in this action. It reads, "At the start of your turn in the Command Phase, you may return the probe card to the top of the deck." But if you can keep the Empire torn between two mysteries, why would you ever return the probe card to the top of the deck? The reason is that once the Imperials have sent their fleet to the system, they'll no longer wonder if that's the one in which your base is hidden. At this point, then, the ability to return the card to the top of the probe deck is a stall tactic that prevents the Empire from drawing another, more useful probe card.
    [IMG]
    After the Imperials subjugate Mygeeto, the Rebels may use Under the Radar to place the Mygeeto probe card back atop the probe deck, momentarily slowing the Imperial's ongoing search.
    And if you're lucky, that one beat of misinformation might be the last you need, allowing you just enough time to gain your last point of reputation and incite open rebellion through the galaxy!

    --Adm. Nick
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