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Amph Filmmakers & Critics' Top Ten Movies: Liv Ullmann

Discussion in 'Archive: The Amphitheatre' started by Nevermind, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. DarthBoba

    DarthBoba Manager Emeritus star 9 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Jun 29, 2000
    I'm going with that being because the overwhelming majority of films were produced more than twenty years ago. Law of averages and all-there's a good fifty years worth of films between the dawn of the color era and 1990. Plus most of these people are in their forties or older; their cinematic tastes aren't necessarily going to reflect our generation's tastes.
     
  2. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    I suspect that these lists also come from different years.
     
  3. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    [link=http://www.criterion.com/explore/125-guillermo-del-toros-top-10]Guillermo del toro's Criterion Top Ten[/link]

    I found this elsewhere, but it also includes the reasons del Toro included these films, which is the interesting part, so here it is.
     
  4. Mastadge

    Mastadge Manager Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Jun 4, 1999
    Strangely, I've got 3 of those titles out from my library right now -- The Night of the Hunter, Eyes Without a Face and Häxan.
     
  5. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    "Haxan" was on the 1001 Movies list, but I haven't seen it. Nor had anyone else.
     
  6. Chancellor_Ewok

    Chancellor_Ewok Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Does anyone find it funny that [link=http://www.criterion.com/films/578-armageddon]Armageddon[/link] is part of the Criterion Collection.

    [face_laugh]
     
  7. CloneUncleOwen

    CloneUncleOwen Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Wow.[face_hypnotized]

    And the Criterion Collection prides itself on releasing the highest quality films?

    Go figure.

    HAXAN is a fantastic semi-documentary film that critics are constantly comparing
    contemporary horror films to, even pornographic twaddle such as ANTICHRIST.
    It surprises me that so few film students ever mention having viewed it in class;
    they were probably too busy being forced to review ARMAEGEDDON instead.
     
  8. Mastadge

    Mastadge Manager Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Jun 4, 1999
    Two guesses as to what happened: (1) With The Rock, Michael Bay seemed to be a director poised to become an important (in more than just commercial terms) contemporary director, so Criterion jumped on the rights to his next film. Whoops. Or (2) it was some kind of deal. I know some CD labels who specialize in classic film music will release a contemporary score that's not really their cup of tea as part of an agreement with a studio to acquire more classic scores from the archive. It's possible something similar happened: Criterion wanted rights to older films from a studio, and they said sure, as long as you release this Michael Bay stuff too.
     
  9. Rogue1-and-a-half

    Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Nov 2, 2000
    Interesting list; no one will quibble with his Kurosawa, though some might with his Time Bandits. Pleasantly surprised to see Preston Sturges; I'll have to watch Unfaithfully Yours as it's one of his I haven't seen.
     
  10. duende

    duende Jedi Master star 5

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    Apr 28, 2006
    i've seen and really like most of these. neat guy.

    bay got criterions because he asked. criterion agreed to release bay criterions to attract and introduce new customers to the company.
     
  11. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    If they have to move the occasional drek in order to offer rarities, I'm not going to complain.
     
  12. Vincent-Kenobi

    Vincent-Kenobi Jedi Knight star 3

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    Sep 4, 2008
    Not surprised to see that del Toro listed Spirit of the Beehive, considering that he covered similar material in The Devil's Backbone and Pan's Labyrinth.
     
  13. duende

    duende Jedi Master star 5

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    Apr 28, 2006
    that's exactly how i feel about it. i'm sure those releases were a huge boon to the company. i remember a lot of people at the time thought it sullied their reputation or something, which is ridiculous.
     
  14. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Michael Caton-Jones
    (Filmmaker: Scandal, Doc Hollywood, Rob Roy)

    Seven Samurai (1954, Akira Kurosawa)
    Grand Illusion (1937, Jean Renoir)
    Ikiru (1952, Akira Kurosawa)
    My Darling Clementine (1946, John Ford)
    Midnight Cowboy (1969, John Schlesinger)
    L'Atalante (1934, Jean Vigo)
    The Maggie (1953, Alexander Mackendrick)
    The Awful Truth (1937, Leo McCarey)
    Show People (1928, King Vidor)
    The Philadelphia Story (1940, George Cukor)

    A good bit of comedy: "The Awful Truth" for one. I haven't seen "The Maggie" and would like to, because it's directed by Mackendrick (I think)
     
  15. Rogue1-and-a-half

    Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Nov 2, 2000
    The Philadelphia Story and The Awful Truth? Well, I don't blame him a bit. Show People is a film I'd like to see because it stars Marion "Rosebud" Davies, but it's very hard to find.
     
  16. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    TCM shows it; I'll try next time I see it.

    Vincent Canby
    (Film Critic: The New York Times)

    Intolerance (1916, D.W. Griffith)
    The Circus (1928, Charles Chaplin)
    The General (1927, Buster Keaton)
    Sherlock Jr. (1924, Buster Keaton)
    Nights of Cabiria (1957, Federico Fellini)
    Some Like It Hot (1959, Billy Wilder)
    Rear Window (1954, Alfred Hitchcock)
    The Magnificent Ambersons (1942, Orson Welles)
    Weekend (1967, Jean-Luc Godard)
    Badlands (1973, Terrence Malick)

    First cite of the great "Rear Window" and of "Badlands"
     
  17. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    Charles Champlin
    (Film Critic)

    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    The Godfather Part II (1974, Francis Ford Coppola)
    The Godfather (1972, Francis Ford Coppola)
    The Gold Rush (1925, Charles Chaplin)
    Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939, Frank Capra)
    Gone with the Wind (1939, Victor Fleming)
    Show People (1928, King Vidor)
    All That Jazz (1979, Bob Fosse)
    Chinatown (1974, Roman Polanski)
    The Maltese Falcon (1941, John Huston)

    Second cite of "Show People"...first of "The Maltese Falcon"

     
  18. Manisphere

    Manisphere Jedi Master star 5

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    Aug 25, 2007
    Kane, Maltese Falcon, Godfather II (that's right II) and Chinatown. Gone with the Wind?? I never quite get why this film is so popular outside of the the huge technical advancements. And Chaplin's Modern Times and City Lights are better than The Gold Rush IMO.

    Did Pauline Kael ever have a top ten? I would think not but I'd like to see one if she did.
     
  19. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    I don't think so.
     
  20. CloneUncleOwen

    CloneUncleOwen Jedi Master star 4

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    Jul 30, 2009
    You've already answered part of the question -- the huge technical advancements. If you add to that a script adapted from
    a popular novel, and famous contemporary actors... well, that sums it up.

    Of note is how unpopular the movie is with film critics. Only three of the Top Ten lists posted so far (including Champlin's)
    have picked it. Of course some film critics snub blockbuster movies for a number of reasons; but close to one out of ten?

     
  21. Havac

    Havac Former Moderator star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Sep 29, 2005
    That's probably the most "accessible" list so far -- the density of well-known classics with name recognition is much higher there than any of the other lists. The others tend to be much more eclectic or obscure.
     
  22. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001

    That's because it's a producer's film rather than a director's.
     
  23. Rogue1-and-a-half

    Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Nov 2, 2000
    I recently saw Gone with the Wind on the big screen at a local theater (they brought it back for a one week run as part of their Fall Classics series). If some critics don't like it, fine; they can go jump in a lake. It's a great movie and it still holds up; got to be about the fifth time I've seen it and it's still brilliant.
     
  24. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    Jackie Chan
    (Filmmaker: Project A II, Drunken Master II)

    The General (1927, Buster Keaton)
    City Lights (1931, Charles Chaplin)
    Rocky (1976, John G. Avildsen)
    War and Peace (1968, Sergei Bondarchuk)
    Seven Samurai (1954, Akira Kurosawa)
    Gone with the Wind (1939, Victor Fleming)
    Jurassic Park (1993, Steven Spielberg)
    My Fair Lady (1964, George Cukor)
    Pocketful of Miracles (1961, Frank Capra)
    Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean)


    I suppose the Capra film might seem good if it were dubbed into Chinese.
     
  25. JohnWesleyDowney

    JohnWesleyDowney Jedi Master star 5

    Registered:
    Jan 27, 2004


    I'm surprised there aren't more silent comedies on Jackie's list. He's frequently talked about how
    all the old stars of the silent era that did stunt comedy influenced his work, his timing, etc.