Amph Filmmakers & Critics' Top Ten Movies: Liv Ullmann

Discussion in 'Archive: The Amphitheatre' started by Nevermind, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Richard Lester
    (Filmmaker: A Hard Day's Night, The Three Musketeers)

    Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)
    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982, Steven Spielberg)
    The 400 Blows (1959, Francois Truffaut)
    The General (1927, Buster Keaton)
    The Godfather/The Godfather Part II (1972-74, Francis Ford Coppola)
    Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean)
    Mr. Hulot's Holiday (1953, Jacques Tati)
    Nashville (1975, Robert Altman)
    Seven Samurai (1954, Akira Kurosawa)

    No real guide to his style here.
  2. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    The Tati influence isn't surprising, and the Keaton film is a given since he popped up in A Funny Thing Happened...

    A solid list.
  3. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5

    That particular Tati film is one of David Lynch's all-time favorites. Go figure.
  4. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Tati is an acquired taste that I never acquired.

    Jerry Lewis
    (Filmmaker: The Bellboy, The Nutty Professor)

    An Affair to Remember (1957, Leo McCarey)
    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    The Fountainhead (1949, King Vidor)
    All About Eve (1950, Joseph L. Mankiewicz)
    The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938, Michael Curtiz/William Keighley)
    On the Waterfront (1954, Elia Kazan)
    Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961, Blake Edwards)
    Shadow of a Doubt (1943, Alfred Hitchcock)
    Harry and the Hendersons (1987, William Dear)
    Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)

    I'm guessing what he liked about "Breakfast At Tiffany's" was Mickey Rooney.
  5. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

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    Harry & the Hendersons. Right between Casablanca & Shadow of a Doubt. Criminy.
  6. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

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    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5
    Rogue, it's Jerry Lewis. There's got to be at least one zany choice on the list! ;)
  7. Django211 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 6, 1999
    star 4
    I think its the subtlety that Lewis often strives for
  8. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Richard Linklater
    (Filmmaker: Dazed and Confused, Waking Life)

    Some Came Running (1958, Vincente Minnelli)
    Pickpocket (1959, Robert Bresson)
    2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick)
    GoodFellas (1990, Martin Scorsese)
    The Mother and the Whore (1973, Jean Eustache)
    Los Olvidados (1950, Luis Bunuel)
    In a Year with Thirteen Moons (1978, Rainer Werner Fassbinder)
    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    Fanny and Alexander (1983, Ingmar Bergman)
    Carmen Jones (1954, Otto Preminger)

    Some interesting choices here.
  9. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5

    Never in a million years would I have expected Richard Linklater to have a Vincent Minnelli film on his list. Just goes to show people can surprise you.
  10. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    Carmen Jones?! What do you know?
  11. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Ken Loach
    (Filmmaker: Kes, Land and Freedom)

    The Battle of Algiers (1965, Gillo Pontecorvo)
    Breathless (1959, Jean-Luc Godard)
    Bicycle Thieves (1949, Vittorio De Sica)
    Closely Watched Trains (1966, Jiri Menzel)
    Firemen's Ball (1965, Milos Forman)
    Jules et Jim (1961, Francois Truffaut)
    Loves of a Blonde (1964, Milos Forman)
    The Rules of the Game (1939, Jean Renoir)
    The Tree of Wooden Clogs (1978, Ermanno Olmi)
    Wild Strawberries (1957, Ingmar Bergman)

    3 Czech films, and not a single Anglophone one...
  12. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Phillip Lopate
    (Film Writer: Totally, Tenderly, Tragically)

    Contempt (1963, Jean-Luc Godard)
    The Earrings of Madame de... (1953, Max Ophuls)
    Gertrud (1964, Carl Theodor Dreyer)
    L'Atalante (1934, Jean Vigo)
    The Leopard (1963, Luchino Visconti)
    M (1931, Fritz Lang)
    The Rules of the Game (1939, Jean Renoir)
    A Star Is Born (1954, George Cukor)
    Ugetsu (1953, Kenji Mizoguchi)
    Vertigo (1958, Alfred Hitchcock)

    "A Star is Born"? Seriously?
  13. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Tim Lucas
    (Film Writer: Video Watchdog)

    Sunrise (1927, F.W. Murnau)
    J'accuse (1938, Abel Gance)
    Beauty and the Beast (1946, Jean Cocteau)
    The Third Man (1949, Carol Reed)
    Umberto D. (1953, Vittorio De Sica)
    Contempt (1963, Jean-Luc Godard)
    2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick)
    Once Upon a Time in the West (1969, Sergio Leone)
    Perceval (1978, Eric Rohmer)
    Three Colors: Red (1994, Krzysztof Kieslowski)
  14. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Tom Luddy
    (Director of Telluride Film Festival)

    The General (1927, Buster Keaton)
    The Palm Beach Story (1942, Preston Sturges)
    Make Way for Tomorrow (1937, Leo McCarey)
    There's Always Tomorrow (1956, Douglas Sirk)
    Sunrise (1927, F.W. Murnau)
    Outskirts (1933, Boris Barnet)
    Napoleon (1927, Abel Gance)
    Farewell, Home Sweet Home (1999, Otar Iosseliani)
    Enamorada (1943, Emilio Fernandez)
    Travellers (1992, Bahram Beizai)
  15. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Sidney Lumet
    (Filmmaker: 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon)

    The Best Years of Our Lives (1946, William Wyler)
    Fanny and Alexander (1983, Ingmar Bergman)
    The Godfather (1972, Francis Ford Coppola)
    The Grapes of Wrath (1940, John Ford)
    Intolerance (1916, D.W. Griffith)
    The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928, Carl Theodor Dreyer)
    Ran (1985, Akira Kurosawa)
    Roma (1972, Federico Fellini)
    Singin' in the Rain (1952, Stanley Donen/Gene Kelly)
    2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick)
  16. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    Not surprising that he picks the least sentimental, hardest Ford film.

    Also, Ran is a given, since Lumet basically mustered up the campaign that got Kurosawa his first and only Best Director Oscar nomination for that film.
  17. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    "The Grapes of Wrath" is still sentimental, and that holy fool routine makes my teeth ache.
  18. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

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    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    We're talking about John Ford's filmography here, though; it's all relative.
  19. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Well, true. Other than Henry Fonda, not my fave Ford.
  20. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    star 6
    Tony Macklin
    (Film Writer: Voices from the Set)

    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    The Gold Rush (1925, Charles Chaplin)
    The General (1927, Buster Keaton)
    The Searchers (1956, John Ford)
    La Dolce Vita (1959, Federico Fellini)
    Vertigo (1958, Alfred Hitchcock)
    2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick)
    Jules and Jim (1961, Francois Truffaut)
    The Godfather Part II (1974, Francis Ford Coppola)
    Once Upon a Time in the West (1969, Sergio Leone)
  21. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

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    Very typical list. Not a single curve ball.
  22. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Guy Maddin
    (Filmmaker: The Heart of the World, The Saddest Music in the World)

    The Chase (1947, Arthur Ripley)
    They Won't Believe Me (1947, Irving Pichel)
    The Big Carnival (1951, Billy Wilder)
    The Face Behind the Mask (1941, Robert Florey)
    Johnny Apollo (1940, Henry Hathaway)
    Scarlet Street (1945, Fritz Lang)
    Reign of Terror (1949, Anthony Mann)
    A Voice in the Wind (1944, Arthur Ripley)
    Nightmare Alley (1947, Edmund Goulding)
    D.O.A. (1949, Rudolph Mate)

    Guy Maddin, OTOH, wouldn't know a conventional choice if it hit him in the eye. Of these, I have seen three, and "Reign of Terror" which was directed by Anthony Mann, but is B movie about the French Revolution, is a real signpost to Maddin's style.
  23. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Derek Malcolm
    (Film Critic: Guardian, UK)

    The Decalogue (1988, Krzysztof Kieslowski)
    The Music Room (1958, Satyajit Ray)
    Rio Bravo (1959, Howard Hawks)
    The Seventh Seal (1956, Ingmar Bergman)
    The Spirit of the Beehive (1973, Victor Erice)
    The Story of the Late Chrysanthemums (1939, Kenji Mizoguchi)
    The Time to Live and the Time to Die (1985, Hou Hsiao-hsien)
    Tokyo Story (1953, Yasujiro Ozu)
    Touch of Evil (1958, Orson Welles)
    Tristana (1970, Luis Bunuel)
  24. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Leonard Maltin
    (Film Critic: Leonard Maltin's Video Guide)

    Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)
    The Maltese Falcon (1941, John Huston)
    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    Singin' in the Rain (1952, Stanley Donen/Gene Kelly)
    Modern Times (1936, Charles Chaplin)
    A Night at the Opera (1935, Sam Wood)
    King Kong (1933, Merian C. Cooper/Ernest B. Schoedsack)
    It's a Wonderful Life (1946, Frank Capra)
    Dumbo (1941, Ben Sharpsteen)
    His Girl Friday (1940, Howard Hawks)

    A lot of other people probably wanted to put "Dumbo" on their lists...
  25. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5

    Wow, the newest movie on his list is 60 years old, Singing in the Rain.

    Surely there's been at least one movie since 1952 that rates "top ten."

    I guess Leonard is very old school.