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Amph Filmmakers & Critics' Top Ten Movies: Liv Ullmann

Discussion in 'Archive: The Amphitheatre' started by Nevermind, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. Merlin_Ambrosius69

    Merlin_Ambrosius69 Jedi Master star 5

    Registered:
    Aug 4, 2008
    I like all the films Maltin lists -- a lot! They're all in my Top 50, except His Girl Friday, which I've never seen. But the only two that make it to my Top 10 are Maltese Falcon and King Kong.
     
  2. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    You've never seen "His Girl Friday"? You're in for a treat, then, if you can find it on TCM or DVD. Competes with "Some Like It Hot" as the best and most sustained American comedy.
     
  3. Merlin_Ambrosius69

    Merlin_Ambrosius69 Jedi Master star 5

    Registered:
    Aug 4, 2008
    Okay, thanks for the recommendation! Some Like It Hot is probably my favorite comedy of all time, certainly of the period, along with Design for Living (a bit earlier), so if His Girl Friday compares favorably with those, I'll keep an eye out for it.
     
  4. CloneUncleOwen

    CloneUncleOwen Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2009
    [face_laugh]

    STR was released when Leonard Maltin was two-years-old, and he hasn't seen anything since that
    qualifies for his Top Ten list.

    This is Leonard being soooo Maltin.

    [face_laugh]
     
  5. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Todd McCarthy
    (Film Critic: Variety)

    Trouble in Paradise (1932, Ernst Lubitsch)
    The Scarlet Empress (1934, Josef von Sternberg)
    The Crime of Monsieur Lange (1935, Jean Renoir)
    To Have and Have Not (1944, Howard Hawks)
    Notorious (1946, Alfred Hitchcock)
    Shoot the Piano Player (1960, Francois Truffaut)
    Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean)
    Contempt (1963, Jean-Luc Godard)
    Chimes at Midnight (1966, Orson Welles)
    The Godfather Part II (1974, Francis Ford Coppola)

    Nothing past 1974 here, either. "Trouble in Paradise" is the best sustained rom com I've ever seen; "The Scarlet Empress" is a deeply silly exercise in style. Haven't seen the Renoir; the Hawkes is good, but not this good.
     
  6. JohnWesleyDowney

    JohnWesleyDowney Jedi Master star 5

    Registered:
    Jan 27, 2004

    Todd McCarthy is one of the very few "major" film critics I have much respect for. I read his reviews for years when he was the lead critic for Variety, the industry publication of record, and when he moved to the Hollywood Reporter, I followed him there.

    He is incredibly well-informed and knowledgeable, very even handed, and there's never a single note of malice or personal attacks in his reviews. A filmmaker gets a fair assessment of their work from this guy. McCarthy knows film, and he's never guilty of "cut and paste" film criticism where he uses the same attacks on a filmmaker over and over.

    His list is a little more obscure than I would have expected, but no big deal.
     
  7. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Russ Meyer
    (Filmmaker: Vixen; Faster Pussycat! Kill! Kill!)

    Cool Hand Luke (1967, Stuart Rosenberg)
    The Third Man (1949, Carol Reed)
    Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)
    My Little Chickadee (1940, Edward F. Cline)
    The Bank Dick (1940, Edward F. Cline)
    42nd Street (1933, Lloyd Bacon)
    Gunga Din (1939, George Stevens)
    The Godfather (1972, Francis Ford Coppola)
    The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Frank Darabont)
    Sahara (1943, Zoltan Korda)

    "The Bank Dick" gave me pause, in this case...
     
  8. CloneUncleOwen

    CloneUncleOwen Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Not surprising, considering it's on the Top Ten list of a man who had

    King of the Nudies -- I'm Glad I Did It

    carved on his tombstone.
     
  9. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Errol Morris
    (Filmmaker: Fast, Cheap & Out of Control, The Fog of War)

    Detour (1945, Edgar G. Ulmer)
    There's Always Tomorrow (1956, Douglas Sirk)
    Make Way for Tomorrow (1937, Leo McCarey)
    A Man Escaped (1956, Robert Bresson)
    The Crime of Monsieur Lange (1935, Jean Renoir)
    Stray Dog (1949, Akira Kurosawa)
    The Rise to Power of Louis XIV (1966, Roberto Rossellini)
    Human Desire (1954, Fritz Lang)
    Ace in the Hole (1951, Billy Wilder)
    Psycho (1960, Alfred Hitchcock)

    "Monsieur Lange" again! I'll have to see it.
     
  10. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Camile Paglia
    (Professor: University of the Arts in Philadelphia)

    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    La Dolce Vita (1959, Federico Fellini)
    Gone with the Wind (1939, Victor Fleming)
    Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean)
    North by Northwest (1959, Alfred Hitchcock)
    Orpheus (1949, Jean Cocteau)
    Persona (1966, Ingmar Bergman)
    2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick)
    The Ten Commandments (1923-56, Cecil B. DeMille)
    Vertigo (1958, Alfred Hitchcock)

    A vote for DeMille!
     
  11. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Alexander Payne
    (Filmmaker: Election, About Schmidt)

    The Landlord (1970, Hal Ashby)
    The Man from Laramie (1955, Anthony Mann)
    A Moment of Innocence (1996, Mohsen Makhmalbaf)
    La Notte (1961, Michelangelo Antonioni)
    Red Beard (1965, Akira Kurosawa)
    Ride the High Country (1962, Sam Peckinpah)
    Room at the Top (1959, Jack Clayton)
    A Special Day (1977, Ettore Scola)
    Viridiana (1961, Luis Bunuel)
    White Nights (1957, Luchino Visconti)
     
  12. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Alex Proyas
    (Filmmaker: The Crow, Dark City)

    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    Dr. Strangelove (1964, Stanley Kubrick)
    The Exorcist (1973, William Friedkin)
    The Godfather (1972, Francis Ford Coppola)
    It's a Wonderful Life (1946, Frank Capra)
    Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean)
    North by Northwest (1959, Alfred Hitchcock)
    One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975, Milos Forman)
    The Third Man (1949, Carol Reed)
    The Wizard of Oz (1939, Victor Fleming)

    "The Exorcist" jumps out...
     
  13. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis

    The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Jedi Grand Master star 5

    Registered:
    Mar 3, 2005
    Those are all fine films, but that's an exceptionally boring list. Not totally surprising, though.
     
  14. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    Mario Puzo
    (Film Writer: The Godfather, Superman)

    The Godfather (1972, Francis Ford Coppola)
    They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969, Sydney Pollack)
    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    The Informer (1935, John Ford)
    Gone with the Wind (1939, Victor Fleming)
    Chariots of Fire (1981, Hugh Hudson)
    Fiddler on the Roof (1971, Norman Jewison)
    Double Indemnity (1944, Billy Wilder)
    The Third Man (1949, Carol Reed)
    Out of Africa (1985, Sydney Pollack)
     
  15. Ramza

    Ramza Administrator Emeritus star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA VIP

    Registered:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Solid list, but with that first pick I can't help but think "Biased, much?"
     
  16. Chancellor_Ewok

    Chancellor_Ewok Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Yeah. I read that and I thought, "wait a minuet, can you pick your own movie?"

    :p
     
  17. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

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    Oct 14, 2001
    You can, but why stop with the first one?
     
  18. Ramza

    Ramza Administrator Emeritus star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA VIP

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    Jul 13, 2008
    Well, III would just be ridiculous. As for II, he was less involved on that one.
     
  19. drg4

    drg4 Jedi Master star 4

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    Jul 30, 2005
    Why wouldn't he be? Coppola turned his little minor potboiler into the Greatest American Film. Honestly, there shouldn't even be any other movies on his list.
     
  20. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Terrence Rafferty
    (Film Critic: New Yorker)

    The Rules of the Game (1939, Jean Renoir)
    Charulata (1964, Satyajit Ray)
    L'Atalante (1934, Jean Vigo)
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971, Robert Altman)
    The Navigator (1924, Buster Keaton)
    The Night of the Hunter (1955, Charles Laughton)
    Sans soleil (1982, Chris Marker)
    Seven Samurai (1954, Akira Kurosawa)
    Sunrise (1927, F.W. Murnau)
    The Wild Bunch (1969, Sam Peckinpah)
     
  21. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Carol Reed
    (Filmmaker: Odd Man Out, The Third Man)

    City Lights (1931, Charles Chaplin)
    Ninotchka (1939, Ernst Lubitsch)
    Children of Paradise (1945, Marcel Carne)
    Gone with the Wind (1939, Victor Fleming)
    La Ronde (1950, Max Ophuls)
    All Quiet on the Western Front (1930, Lewis Milestone)
    Carnival in Flanders (1935, Jacques Feyder)
    Variety (1925, E.A. Dupont)
    The Baker's Wife (1938, Marcel Pagnol)
    Pygmalion (1938, Anthony Asquith/Leslie Howard)

    This list is probably from the 50's, given Reed died in 1976, and the latest film--"La Ronde"--which is a bad pick, I think--there are plenty of better Ophuls films--is 1950. In fact, this is early 50's, I'm willing to bet. In the first 50's poll of film critics all but three of the films were silent.
     
  22. JohnWesleyDowney

    JohnWesleyDowney Jedi Master star 5

    Registered:
    Jan 27, 2004

    Carol Reed was a fan of Gone with the Wind? I find that surprising. Perhaps I shouldn't, I think what
    it is is a fine example of epic, over the top melodrama, traditional Hollywood filmmaking from the golden age. I
    just didn't think it would be something tht would appeal to a Brit that made a film like The Third Man.
     
  23. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis

    The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Jedi Grand Master star 5

    Registered:
    Mar 3, 2005
    Gone with the Wind in conjuction with Children of Paradise would indicate that big, lavish epics with lots of moving parts had some appeal to him, which would explain Oliver!.

    Not The Agony and the Ecstasy, though, which is a very contained and intimate story set against an opulent background.

    It's surprising that Reed was eventually able to do those sorts of films though, and was a fan of them too, given that his calling card films like The Third Man, Odd Man Out, The Man Between and The Fallen Idol are all extremely claustrophobic - uncomfortably so.
     
  24. Nevermind

    Nevermind Jedi Knight star 6

    Registered:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Donald Richie
    (Film critic: The Films of Akira Kurosawa, Ozu)

    The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928, Carl Theodor Dreyer)
    Earth (1930, Alexander Dovzhenko)
    Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
    Tokyo Story (1953, Yasujiro Ozu)
    Seven Samurai (1954, Akira Kurosawa)
    Pather Panchali (1955, Satyajit Ray)
    Wild Strawberries (1957, Ingmar Bergman)
    L'avventura (1960, Michelangelo Antonioni)
    Au hasard Balthazar (1966, Robert Bresson)
    Mirror (1975, Andrei Tarkovsky)

    Some interesting choices...
     
  25. Rogue1-and-a-half

    Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece star 8 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Nov 2, 2000
    Earth is a fantastic, gripping Soviet movie that not enough people have seen. It's muscular, energetic filmmaking.