JCC Gooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo science!

Discussion in 'Community' started by VadersLaMent, Sep 4, 2012.

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  1. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
    The temp boards were good for a single thread instead of me posting a separate science news thing with new threads so I'll give a go at this for a science thread here on the JCC.

    To start:

    Longevity via calorie restriction questioned

    I do not think the extension of life span will come from anything short of major genetic tamporing through individually applied drug or the extensive use of pluripotent stem cells.
    Last edited by VadersLaMent, Sep 4, 2012
  2. Quixotic-Sith Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 22, 2001
    star 6
  3. ophelia Cards Against Humanity Host. Ex-Mod

    Game Host
    Member Since:
    Jun 25, 2002
    star 6
    Oh, thank God.

    ::gobbles down Twinkies::
  4. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
    Truly, I'd love to know if billionaires invest in genetic research. If I were Bill gates I'd funnel loads of cash to the right folks.
  5. ShaneP Ex-Mod Officio

    Member Since:
    Mar 26, 2001
    star 6
    I agree as far as extension in any significant amount.
  6. Obi-Zahn Kenobi Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 23, 1999
    star 7
    I was suspicious when I read the paper and found out that the monkeys on the high-calorie diet were encouraged to chain smoke and given twice the video game allowance time as the low-calorie group.
  7. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
    Video games are good for your brain and lend heavily to imagination not to mention being a cornerstone of the economy. SO THERE.
  8. Ghost Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 13, 2003
    star 6
  9. TheShinyLightsaber Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Sep 3, 2012
    star 1
    Naturally derived alpha, beta, gamma, and delta tocotrienols may be able to extend lifespan up to 30% according to recent studies. Most cutting edge research on the far more potent E vitamin has been done in the last 2 years, you should really check it out if you have access to scientific journal databases.
  10. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
  11. Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Mar 19, 1999
    star 7
    Happy 35th birthday, Voyager 1. Keep on trekking. May your plutonium-238 oxide spheres continue to generate power until the mid 2020s.

    P.S. Please don't send back a race of superintelligent machines to rid the earth of its human infestation.
    Last edited by Jabbadabbado, Sep 5, 2012
    VadersLaMent and Juliet316 like this.
  12. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
  13. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
  14. ShaneP Ex-Mod Officio

    Member Since:
    Mar 26, 2001
    star 6
  15. Obi-Zahn Kenobi Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 23, 1999
    star 7
    I'm unexcited about the fact that creationists will probably twist it to be like, "See! See! This disproves evolution!"
  16. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
    Look at the comments after the article. It turns into an Intelligent Design debate.
  17. Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Mar 19, 1999
    star 7
    I was pretty amazed to learn that the shape of a DNA strand may be important, that some of the "junk switches" end up close to the genes they influence in the way the DNA molecule is twisted and knotted and balled up. It's all pretty mind boggling. Scientists will likely have centuries of work ahead before we really understand it. Only then will we have a real shot at those genetic slave caste dystopias promised to us in science fiction.
  18. Obi-Zahn Kenobi Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 23, 1999
    star 7
    See, one thing that really annoys me is that they have decided that some DNA we previously thought to have no function may have a function - but there are still pieces of DNA that don't have any function that show common (like retroviral elements).
  19. darthhelinith Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Feb 10, 2009
    star 5
    I'm actually find it a little disappointing that this junk DNA doesn't contain memories of our ancestors. Even though I know that's physically impossible as the amount of data required just to reconstruct a face would be enormous. But still, replaying days in the lives of your ancestors would be awesome.
  20. ShaneP Ex-Mod Officio

    Member Since:
    Mar 26, 2001
    star 6
    How would it do that? If anything, it would make me ask the question why an all-powerful deity would do that.
    I know you were waiting for those to happen. Hate to disappoint you. :p
  21. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
    Let's not look down on a slave caste of clones. I'm tired.

    Immersive VR is the next generation of gaming part 1

    People have always been dreaming about virtual reality since Neuromancer and Snow Crash, and in the late 90’s it really captured the public imagination. VR companies were popping up left and right, but the technology wasn't quite there yet and the industry crashed and burned around the same time as the dotcom bubble.(not to mention ST Holodecks and The Matrix).

    Part 2

    “Imagine an HMD with a massive field of view and more pixels than 1080p per eye, wireless PC link, built-in absolute head and hand/weapon/wand positioning, and native integration with some (if not all) of the major game engines, all for less than $1,000 USD,” Palmer says. “That can happen in 2013!”
    There’s going to be a lot of innovation with this kind of hardware in the next ten years during the following console cycle — if you even want to call it a console cycle anymore. All I know is it’s going to be a hell of a decade.
    By the time 2013 comes to a close, the returning VR industry will be back in full swing — this time as part of the multi-billion dollar games industry.

    I might need to keep my eye on gameing stocks.

    This was prompted by this article: Oculus Rift: Is the world finally ready for virtual reality games

    The problem? Not tech, but people. Folks get sick from 3d films, they may have problems with VR.

  22. Condition2SQ Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 5, 2012
    star 4
    "Science" is the panacea through which all human progress will forever be measured.

    Woooooo!
  23. malkieD2 Ex-Manager and RSA

    Member Since:
    Jun 7, 2002
    star 7
    I am here. End of message.
  24. Ghost Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 13, 2003
    star 6
    New 3D Printing Center Aims to Boost US Manufacturing

    Laser-armed 3D printers could exorcise the ghosts of shuttered steel mills for U.S. manufacturing. President Barack Obama has awarded $30 million to establish the first national 3D printing institute in an Ohio town at the heart of the so-called "Rust Belt" region of the Midwest.

    The National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute — a public-private partnership headed by the U.S. military — wants to harness the power of 3D printing to transform almost any digital blueprint into a physical object. Such technology could not only speed up and cut the costs of manufacturing robots or military weapons, but could also create human organs, bones or body parts tailored for specific patients.

    "I'm pleased that we are taking steps to strengthen American manufacturing by launching a new manufacturing institute in Ohio," said Obama in a statement. "This institute will help make sure that the manufacturing jobs of tomorrow take root not in places like China or India, but right here in the United States of America."

    The town of Youngstown, Ohio, won the $30 million in federal funding through a competitive selection process. Its pilot institute for 3D printing will also receive an additional $40 million from the winning consortium of manufacturing firms, universities, community colleges, and nonprofit organizations based in the "Tech Belt" across Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

    A 3D printing institute represents just the first of 15 manufacturing innovation institutes — the first step toward realizing Obama's $1 billion vision for a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation.

    Researchers have already used 3D printers to make everything from spider robots to artificial blood vessels, as well as a tailor-made jawbone surgically implanted in an elderly woman. A gun enthusiast has even used a 3D-printed gun part in a pistol. [3D Printer Helps Make Working Gun]

    U.S. manufacturing has already experienced startling growth since the loss of many jobs before and during the recent economic recession. The U.S. economy has added more than 530,000 manufacturing jobs since February 2010, as rising business costs in countries such as China have led many U.S. companies to return home.

    The speed and flexibility of 3D printing promises to give U.S. manufacturers the capability to quickly print out even the rarest parts of an old machine, or customize parts to fit the needs of a certain customer. That means the U.S. military could someday print on-demand replacement weapons or machines for the battlefield, even as DIY tinkerers create and innovate upon designs in their own homes.





    http://news.yahoo.com/3d-printing-center-aims-boost-us-manufacturing-201149938.html
    Last edited by Darth-Ghost, Sep 9, 2012
  25. Obi-Zahn Kenobi Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 23, 1999
    star 7
    The way it supports evolution is that portions of DNA that are essentially, there accidentally, are not conserved because they have a purpose. They are conserved because they happen to be there. You can compare these regions of DNA and say, "Oh, humans are closest to chimps, and chimps, humans, gorillas, and orangutans are all similar but they're all different from dogs and cats and such." The argument that creationists often respond with is, "But that indicates that they were designed together! Not that they have common ancestry!"

    They're of course, wrong. but whenever CERTAIN portions of non-coding DNA (there's a lot of it, and not all of it has had a useful purpose identified, despite what this article says) are revealed to actually have a purpose, they say, "See! Look! It has a purpose! Therefore it can't be an accident that it's conserved! Our designer explanation is just as plausible as common descent!"
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