Greenscreen spill suppresion.

Discussion in 'Fan Films, Fan Audio & SciFi 3D' started by PixelMagic, Jun 4, 2002.

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  1. Shadoe42 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Aug 30, 2001
    star 3
    Thanks, I was pretty happy with the last one. really makes me want to go out and shoot some video footage to composite hehe...

    Nick: and here I was beggining to think I was just about the only other one who used MSP besides Clay.
  2. PadawanNick Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 6, 2001
    star 4
    Are you kidding? MSP is almost all I talk about around here.

    How do you think I wrote this and composited this?
    (Note: same old links to bluescreen tut and saberchuck test, guys. If you've seen 'em already, don't bother following the links.)

    Have fun!
  3. Lyrael Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 22, 2002
    star 1
    What is Commotion Pro?
  4. Lord_Rive TFN Fan Films Staff

    VIP
    Member Since:
    Jun 29, 2000
    star 4
    Commotion is a 2D visual effects package (particularly good for roto and motion tracking), developed by ILMer Scott Squires... The last couple of incarnations have started to invade After Effects territory in terms of its feature set.
  5. PixelMagic Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 8, 2001
    star 5
    Shadoe, that's the best composite YET! Wow, that's awesome. How were you able to retain so much hair detail? Wow. I must go back and try a third time. I want my composites to look that good too. Back to my Commotion.....
  6. filmmaker Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 10, 2002
    star 2
    Something I've noticed in all of the examples is the lighting. Pixel, try a shot where the foreground is 1 stop hotter than the greenscreen. This will give you a starting point without so much spill to deal with. In all of the examples I saw the green is hotter than the subject, this technique really enhances the spill. I'm no Aftereffects wizard, and all of your mattes are very impressive, especially considering the image you started with. I have been lighting for greenscreen for several years, and though I haven't done it for DV before, the key to it is even lighting on the greenscreen at least a stop under the subject. Sometimes with a subject with light colored hair, I will add a 1/8 magenta gel to the backlight as well, to counteract the green reflection.
  7. PadawanNick Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 6, 2001
    star 4
    OK, took a couple minutes break at work here to throw this together. For fun, this includes some color enhancement to Pixel's face and some light wrapping. As usual, this was all done in MSP6.0

    Have fun.
  8. Shadoe42 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Aug 30, 2001
    star 3
    yargh!! ugh this is the fourth time I have tried to reply to this. hehe this time however I left MSP closed as I think I have corrupted a file in it.. every time I go to one filter it gives me the BSOD...time to uninstall and reinstall it I think.

    Anyway...in a nutshell what I did was follow the basics of this tutorial here...
    http://www.highvid.com/video_t/msp1/01.shtml

    and then take the suggestions Lord Rive and others had made and just played with the settings till it look right.

    I used the monochrome filter as detailed in the tut above but I lowered the threshhold on it way down. This alone helped reduce a lot of the spill ... then I color balanced it a bit to remove more green and add some blue and even added just a touch of red. This helped color correct your shirt from the spill reduction...Thanks Rive :).... I also played with the hue&saturation a bit.

    Then I saved that off and brought in the background and used MSP's bluescreen filter on it and gave it a small soft edge to reduce the white that had appeared around your face from the monochrome filter and the color balancing. There was still a touch of green spill so I color balanced a again taking out green and adding blue.

    to sum up...I played with the filters and tweaked till it looked right :) :) :)

    Shadoe


    p.s. that really was the short version :)
  9. wixmmm Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2001
    star 4
    Everybody, Filmmaker is a PRIME example of why newbies SHOULD NOT be treated like crap just because of their registration date (see I have beef with this board(rant))

    I really learned some stuff from his post... MAGENTA GELS!!! OF COURSE!!!

    That's exactly what I needed... especially since one of my actors have blond spikey hair which is just giving me hell!

    Thanks filmmaker!

    Cya
    Mike
  10. filmmaker Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 10, 2002
    star 2
    No problem Mike. I was looking at images from the other thread "post blue screen test images", and you can see that most of the Lucsfilms blue screen shots all have the blue screen underexposed by a stop or so. I've worked on the lighting for several games at Westwood Studios (Command and Conquer: Tiberian Sun)where we had 100% virtual sets. The things to watch out for is anything highly reflective (it took some masters of lighting to do Vaders helmet), and getting some distance between the actors and the screen also helps. Remember also that sometimes you don't need a huge screen all of the time. If your screen is large enough to be a backing for your actor, or whatever is moving in the shot, you can do a "garbage matte" in post. Just match the color of the green or blue screen and cover the entire frame with a post production wipe.
  11. PixelMagic Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 8, 2001
    star 5
    Hey guys. I just finished my 3rd attempt at greenscreening. I think I got it pretty much like I wanted it, this time. Take a look. It's right under the first two images.

    3rd Greenscreen Attempt
  12. PadawanNick Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 6, 2001
    star 4
    Pixel, that looks great!!!
    I really like the touch of Depth-of-field you gave the matte painting. Just a hint of blur.

    (Of course the saber doesn't look too shabby either!!! :D )

    Sweet!

    Have fun!

  13. PixelMagic Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 8, 2001
    star 5
    Yeah, I like the depth of field as well. I think I should have put a little more blur on it, but I thought that would hint to the composite too much, and it might not look natural.
  14. Macho Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 21, 2001
    star 4
    ahh pixel is catching on! Always add a slight blur to your background unless you are focusing on the background...just a tab to much gives it away unless its a tight up on the actor, at night and to little, like none makes it look to sharp...remember you are trying to recreate what the camera sees in CG not your eye
  15. PixelMagic Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 8, 2001
    star 5
    "ahh pixel is catching on!"

    You make me sound like a newbie, FOO'!

    By the way, do you guys like my sabers? I use a custom technique that is modified from Ryan's and Rives tutorials?
  16. Macho Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 21, 2001
    star 4
  17. Shadoe42 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Aug 30, 2001
    star 3
    Nicely done Pixel.

    Just a touch of hair detail lost. What did you do different this time that you had not done before?
  18. PixelMagic Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 8, 2001
    star 5
    Well, the loss of hair detail was because I has to make a copy of the background OVER the composite to make it darker. I had flattened the image and had to change the background later. Then when I did a blur to give it depth of field, it covered some of the hair detail. I actually had all of the hair detial, but it got "lightwraped" by the above layer.

    Also, my spill suppression has gotten better thanks to you guys. I played with Hue/Saturation, as well as using the After Effects Spill Suppressor. It's so much better than the Composite Wizard Spill Suppressor. I still used Primatte for the actual greenscreening though.

    Also, I did this as a MULTIPASS composite (can you believe that, Dave) I make 3 seperate masks. One for the hair, one for the front of the face, and one for the horrible green spill on my neck.
  19. Shadoe42 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Aug 30, 2001
    star 3
    So how did you go about making multiple masks? I have tried it and haven;t had good results with it at all :)
  20. PixelMagic Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 8, 2001
    star 5
    Well, basically, you make three different layers, then make three diffeent garbage masks. One for the hair, one for the face, one for the neck.
  21. Gardulo Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Apr 21, 2002
    star 3
    Could You remind me What the matte was made with and also how to make freakin snow with terragen thank you
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