Amph Harry Turtledove's Worldwar series

Discussion in 'Archive: SF&F: Books and Comics' started by Jek_Windu, Feb 27, 2007.

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  1. Jek_Windu Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jan 26, 2003
    star 4
    I just started reading this, and it is without doubt, some of the best SF I've come across. It's an alternate history of World War II- what if an alien a race had chosen this time to invade, forcing the Allies and the Axis to ally against the greater foe?


    The concept seemed a little corney to me at the bookstore, but all of that evaporated at the first page. Turtledove's worldbuilding is brilliant- just enough to explain things wihout hammy up the story or bogging down the narrative. I was just wondering if anyone else had come across this.
  2. Darth-Lando Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 12, 2002
    star 6
    My brother has the entire series and speaks highly of it. I've never read it myself but have always wanted to. I read Turtledove's Guns of the South (a time traveler goes back in time and gives AK-47's to the South during the American Civil War) which was quite excellent.
  3. Lord_NoONE Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 17, 2001
    star 5
    I love the pic on the cover of that book. Robert E. Lee chillin' with an AK-47.

    [face_peace]
    LN
  4. Panther50 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Apr 7, 2004
    star 3
    Yeah its pretty good, although I like his current series better It had the USA and Confederate States fighting each other in World War One and they're currently half way through fighting each other again in World War Two.
  5. Obi-Zahn Kenobi Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 23, 1999
    star 7
    I did not like World War. I read the first one and thought it was mediocre. Guns of the South was entertaining, albeit fantastical, and I really enjoyed the American Empire and its prequels.
  6. JEDI-SOLO Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Feb 12, 2002
    star 5
    I read his Darkness books. A six book series with dragons instead of planes, behemoths instead of tanks, magical bolts instead of bullets. I devoured those books they were so good.
  7. Panther50 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Apr 7, 2004
    star 3
    I tried the Darkness books, but I gave up after he killed off a character I liked.
  8. Emperor_Billy_Bob Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 9, 2000
    star 7
    I am a Turtledove fanatic, and I read the entire Worldwar-Colonization-Homeward Bound series.

    The "How Few Remain" series is much better.
  9. JEDI-SOLO Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Feb 12, 2002
    star 5
    Yeah he has no reservations about killing off his characters. Many, Many of them go during the course of those six books. I'm telling you though they are so good.
  10. rebel_cheese Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 6, 2006
    star 4
    I liked the Worldwar books a lot, the Colonization and Homeward Bound books not so much. I haven't even finished Homeward Bound.

    I used to be a Turtledove fanatic, but I burned out on him, I haven't read a single book of his since the second Settling Accounts book.
  11. droideka27 Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    May 28, 2002
    star 7
    I have read a lot of harry turtledove, but not this series. I have a few of them, but i need to get the rest of the 6 before i start reading so i can read them all in a row. I really enjoy his books. I just read Days of Infamy and I really need to go buy the sequel and read that.
  12. Emperor_Billy_Bob Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 9, 2000
    star 7
    I couldn't get in to Day of Infamy, but I liked In the Presence of Mine Enemy
  13. Raven Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 5, 1998
    star 6
    In my opinion, his best work was from a series of short stories collected in Agent of Byzantium. Then again, it?s been a few years since I read those short stories, and I may be putting a rosy glow on them.

    Turtledove is a good author, great attention to consistent world building and details about everyday life. I honestly can?t think of anyone in SF/F who is better at creating a world that feels internally consistent and alive. Where he tends to fall flat is characterization.

    Now, don?t get me wrong, I like Turtledove: but the longer I read his books, the more his characters start to sound alike. And about once a chapter there?s a sequence where a good-natured character shows how prejudice or some other issue that we don?t approve of in a modern liberal society but was more commonly accepted in the past just doesn?t make good common sense.

    Of course, it's also possible that he does it on purpose: showing that whether a person is a barbarian prince, a washed up baseball player turned expert on aliens, or an agent of the Roman Empire, he's still the same guy regardless of his position in life. But, I doubt that that's what he's trying to say.
  14. Panther50 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Apr 7, 2004
    star 3
    Yeah Agents of Byzantium had its moments, although I thought it a bit farfetched how the main character was involved with so many advances.
  15. Raven Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 5, 1998
    star 6
    That's typical Turtledove though. His series about the Fox was the same way.

    And, as it happens, farfetched is not impossible. Somewhere, there's a universe where Leonardo Da Vinci is a fictional character that people call farfetched. ;)
  16. Panther50 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Apr 7, 2004
    star 3
    Touche, I just thought the way things were going, if the book had gone on any longer the main character would have ended up being crowned Emperor probably after leading the army to some victory which they won due entirely to his genius:cool:
  17. JEDI-SOLO Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Feb 12, 2002
    star 5
    I have always wanted HT to write about The Six Years War that he talks about in his Darkness series.
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