[Help please] I need to convince my parents not to return my Code3 AT-ST

Discussion in 'Collecting' started by GrandAdmiralJello, Jan 21, 2006.

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  1. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    Member Since:
    Nov 28, 2000
    star 10
    Here's the story. I'm a Disneyland Cast Member, and we have a holiday discount of 40% on items. We carried three Code3 AT-STs at a price of $450, which is overpriced, I know. However, with my discount, I was able to purchase our last one for the very competitive price of $270.

    I don't really believe in selling collectables, and I like keeping them for one's self. However, my parents don't believe in spending money. Now, I'm a legal adult and I used my own money--so technically it's no one's business what I do with it. Sadly, I have awful parents. We won't get into that.

    I need to be able to convince my parents that holding on to this walker is a good investment. They want me to either return it ASAP or sell it ASAP, and I don't want to do either. I'd really prefer to keep it to myself. But if I had to sell it, I'd like to wait a few years before I did.

    It's signed and numbered out of 1,500. That's a small run, I think.

    However, I'm hardly a collecting expert. I think I've only ever posted on this part of the boards once in my five years here. That's why I'm counting on you folks, presumably with more expertise, to help me with arguments proving that in time, it'd be way more valuable than the $270 I spent on it.

    Your help would be greatly appreciated. If I don't convince 'em, I have to return it tomorrow or the day after--and I feel it'd be something I'd regret, with a limited edition item under a once-in-a-lifetime sale price. If I did return it, it'd probably be gone that same day... and if not, I'd never get that discount again.
  2. OBIX1 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 7, 2002
    star 6
    Sorry dude, that stinks. :(

    But anyway, I'd try to argue to your parents that it's a good investment like any other collectable. Tell them that it could be worth double or triple what you payed for it in 20 or 30 years.

    Just my .02. :)
  3. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    Member Since:
    Nov 28, 2000
    star 10
    That's absolutely my logic: but they just think I'm the stupidest person in the world for spending it on an "overpriced toy" rather than a retirement account. I mean, really.

    If it's a new item on a limited run, you wait for it to gain value. You're not supposed to sell it right away! My parents are big players in the stock market, where things go quickly--they care for liquid assets. They don't see that things like this aren't meant to be sold as soon as they're purchased.
  4. BaronFel88 Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jan 25, 2004
    star 7
    Are there any good precedents (i.e. items released five years ago that have greatly increased in value)? LAJ or CrazyMike should be able to help.
  5. OBIX1 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 7, 2002
    star 6

    Hmm. That's a tough situation. [face_thinking] Maybe if you opened something like a savings account, or bought a bond with the money you saved because of the discount, they would cool down about it.


    Sorry, I know that's not very helpful. But it's all I can think of at the moment. :)
  6. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

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    Member Since:
    Nov 28, 2000
    star 10
    They see things as an ex post facto concept, however. Belatedly opening an account with less money isn't as good as opening the account in the past with all the money.
  7. woppo Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Sep 30, 2004
    star 2
    Sorry but who signed this AT-ST?
    As far as I know they never had a signed one
  8. LAJ_FETT Tech Admin and Collecting/Games Mod

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    May 25, 2002
    star 9
    I could point to an item I have as an example of appreciation. I bought the Boba Fett Gentle Giant mini bust on preorder from TFAW for about 46.00 US. If you do a search on completed auctions on Ebay for this, the prices are up in the high 100-low 200 US dollar range. I believe this bust came out in 2003.
  9. Juke Skywalker Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Mar 27, 2004
    star 5
    My hunch is that your parents prejudice towards this may be such that you may have to switch tactics here. Even if there is evidence to suggest that this will increase in value, they'll still likely argue that CD's, IRA's et., are a better investment (And in that point they're probably right)

    I assume that you're still living at home, which gives you very little leverage. Now, I don't want to start a feud between you and your folks, but perhaps you could point out some things they have. Do they have hobbies? Do they Golf, collect antiques or anything? You could maybe draw a parallel. You know, play the hypocrite card.

    And just remember, when you get out on your own you can leave the toilet seat down, drink OJ straight from the carton and buy all the AT-ST's your heart desires (Disney pun!). :D

    Either way good luck!
  10. IncomT65 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 28, 1999
    star 4
    They call a Code 3 replica an "overpriced toy"? Time to [face_beatup] some sense in them! No, you just hang on to that AT-ST for as long as you want. Oh, and here's an arguement, mom and dad: "It's MY money and that's none of YOUR #%&@ business!"

    Another fine example of an item that has slightly gone up in value: Gentle Giant's Clone Wars Animated Pad-uh-mé maquette. Need I say more?
  11. rebelwookiee Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 18, 2004
    star 4
    i hate to sound like i'm not on your side here, but if you are an adult, and if you are living with your parents, then maybe you'd be better off putting the money towards getting your own place. once you're on your own, you can do whatever you want. of course, i don't really know your situation, so i'm just throwing out ideas.
  12. MarcusP2 Games and Community Reaper

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Jul 10, 2004
    star 6
    Even non-LE collectibles go up in value; I know of at least two Lego sets that have doubled or tripled in price since their release for AOTC. Same thing with a couple of Unleashed figures that now go for $100+. And these are just small toys. High level collectibles like Code 3s should have even better appreciation.

    Or claim to return it and give it to a friend for safekeeping....I'm sure you could get some volunteers right here :)
  13. Padme-Wan_SkyWindu Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jun 1, 2002
    star 3
    This is a very good point. I just did a quick search of ebay for some of the more rare Unleashed figures I have that originally retailed for $15 - many of them are above $70 in these auctions now. I realize you are not dealing with Unleashed figures, but your AT-ST is apparently an extremely limited edition and made even more unique by the fact that it is signed. I suggest you try to convince your parents that the secondary market demand for Star Wars items is huge. Obviously, it's not always the case, but such a limited edition item would definitely have a large demand. Just compare it to these non-limited items MarcusP2 mentioned. Do your parents realize how rabid the Star Wars fans can be for collectibles? If you can make them see that Star Wars items, "toy" or otherwise, are extremely popular collectibles, maybe they would be more willing to let you keep it, especially since you got such a good deal on it. If they are so concerned with money, I would think they would be happy to see that you purchased such a valuable item at such a good price. I apologize if these suggestions are useless, but I wish you luck in any case.
  14. CrazyMike JC Collecting Manager and RSA Canada

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    Member Since:
    Dec 4, 2000
    star 7
    I had run ins with my folks in the past regarding SW items that they felt that were overpriced. I spoke to a friend of mine and we hashed out a plan to make it look like he bought it from me. I later snuggled it back into my place and the item ( an Imperial Walker) was packed away.

    GAJ I really do not know what the answer is. To keep the peace you may have to sell or return it.
  15. AmmersVI Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 25, 2005
    star 4
    ^ Yeah, would they notice if you say, you 'sold' it but didn't get the money back... ie. say you 'sell' it to a friend but in reality you are just letting them keep it for you till you move out and can display it on your own.
    I really can't relate, my parents are big collectors of other things in their own right. So when I got $100+ Star Wars items they really couldn't complain too much. Besides I have my own place and it is better than spending it on drinking, cigarettes... ect. I hope you get to keep it. Good luck! We're pulling for you! [face_peace]
  16. Jedi_Riibu Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 4
    My parents (mostly my mom) would always get at me when I brought home bags full of toys (SW and other things), so much so that when I went shopping I'd keep any goodies I bought in the trunk until a time when they weren't home and then I'd bring them up to my room, which was so full of stuff they'd never be able to notice new things. This only works if you have your own car, though (which I did).

    One time I did pull the trick of pointing out that the money I spend on toys is money better spent than on cigarettes (my mom smokes), which didn't go over too well with her but she wasn't able to say anything back to me.

    You're in a tough position, unfortunately. Despite their dislike for what I spent money on, my parents never crossed the line of actually dictating what I did with it (mostly because they knew there was no way I would ever allow them to). If you can, you should stand your ground. But it sounds like you may have to cave. :( These things are definitely easier to handle when you move out.
  17. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Nov 28, 2000
    star 10
    Ah, the issue is that they've actually opened up my own mail and read my bank statements, which is quite abhorrent to me--but what am I to do? When I'm at school, I can't control what's sent home. I have successfully kept these sort of things hidden for about a month, until they found the statement.

    I'm trying the 'investment' card again. At first, I was caught off guard--but after a single day at work yesterday, it occured to me to point out that there are people who would buy this sort of thing. We sold 12 Kutobuyikas and every single one of the interactive Artoo units were have.

    I'll try the completed auction thing--that seems like the best bet. Showing them solid proof of how much a certain thing goes for now will help demonstrate how much it might potentially go for later. (Not that I am ever really going to sell it :p)

    Thanks for your help everyone: I'll be sure to let you all know how it went.
  18. rebelwookiee Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 18, 2004
    star 4
    i see now...you're away at school. that makes it more difficult. too bad they're so strict.
  19. Jedi_Riibu Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 4
    That is actually illegal. Being your parents doesn't give them the right to open your mail.

    I actually had that problem with my parents, too (not with bank statements, but with any school-related items that got sent home and were actually addressed to me, not "the parents of").

    My solution? I got a PO Box. I changed my mailing address for everything to that and got virtually no mail at home. They're a practical thing to have for general safety if you do a lot of buying/selling/trading online, anyways.

    Good luck!
  20. rebelwookiee Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 18, 2004
    star 4
    yeah, a PO box is a good start. no matter what you do, it's time to cut the umbilical cord and start making your own decisions. besides, part of growing up is doing things that your parents don't agree with. then you learn why they didn't agree with it and you move on.
  21. Master_Jedi80 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 27, 2005
    star 3
    what are your parents threatening if you dont sell it?
  22. Master_Jedi80 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 27, 2005
    star 3
    but perhaps you could point out some things they have. Do they have hobbies? Do they Golf, collect antiques or anything? You could maybe draw a parallel.

    this is a great idea, just present it to them in the right way...

    Hmm. That's a tough situation. Maybe if you opened something like a savings account, or bought a bond with the money you saved because of the discount, they would cool down about it.

    This is an awesome idea. the product was like $400,and you got it for 2-something. you saved $200 of your $$. Show them you are a responsible shopper, and saver...

    so much so that when I went shopping I'd keep any goodies I bought in the trunk until a time when they weren't home and then I'd bring them up to my room, which was so full of stuff they'd never be able to notice new things.

    hahaha, i do this all the time with my girlfriend-hehe

    GrandAdmiralJello,

    Here is my advice.
    First, you are an adult, and it is your $$. I know you still live under your parents roof, and they may even be paying for your schooling as well, butit is your $$ and you have the right to spend it how ever you want.

    i dont know enough about you, your collection, lifestyle or financial history to understand exactly where your parents are coming from. For all i know, they may have a specific reason to check your mail and watch wheere your $$ goes/... But to say the least, they dont want you to waste your $$ on "stuff"...what ever "stuff may be to them". In this case a SW statue.

    Is this AT-ST just stuff for you, or is it more to you.??? You said you bought it to keep, not even as an investment... If it means more to you, its something you really want and have worked for, then dont sell it. It is okay to tell your parents NO, and tell them why...they should respect your decision if you explain it to them in a logical way, as an adult....

    If that wouldnt or doesnt work, and they threaten to kick you out or cut of other assistance they provide, then i obviously dotn want you to take a "stand" and tell them no.

    I lived at home until college, and after college i moved back in for two years. I had many a fight and difference of opinion as my parents on many, many things. Its natural for anyone becoming an adult.

    Unfortunately, the bottom line is this.
    You can tell them in the most respectful way, you want this, you earned the $$ for it, and you are keeping it

    or take the "investment angle" Tell them the value will increase, and it is a risk akin to a stock, and you want this as an investment

    or lie to them, and hide it under you bed, or fix some fake exchange where you hand it of with your buddy for safe keeping.

    Hopefully you wont have to lie. You are 18, so your parents sould start to respect that you are an adult. You have to agree to disagree, but let them know, you understand their lesson, that saving is smart...Perhaps a good faith effort of investing the difference would prove that to them.

    Im sorry that it has come to this...But maybe there are a few lessons to be learned for you and your folks. I suggest telling them why you bought it, what it means to you, and why you want to keep. And also explain to them, that you will display proof that you understand their point, and follow through with it.

    And man, if all else fails, and you have to get rid of it...sell it on ebay, i am sure someone will buy it for more then you paid
  23. Jedi_Riibu Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 4
    Adding to this, children must be allowed to fail and have it left to them to figure out how to resolve the problem. Mom and Dad can't always rush in for the easy fix. Children who rely on their parents to do just that have no hope of becoming self-sufficient when it comes time to leave home.

    Perhaps you could say to your parents something like, "Maybe buying this was a waste of my money. But it's a decision that I made and I have to live with. And I will be the one to decide when to sell it, if ever."
  24. sith_rising Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 7, 2004
    star 4
    I say return it. Over two hundred dollars is way too much for a Star Wars collectible. I have trouble parting with eighty or ninety dollars for a Kotobukiya, but I cap any Star Wars spending at one hundred bucks. I'd like to get some Attakus, Gentle Giant or Sideshow statues, but I just can't rationalize that kind of spending. When you move out, you'll be able to pay a cell phone or power bill for half a year with that kind of money, make a couple of insurance payments, or take a girl out ot dinner several times. Also, since you don't collect to sell, you'll never see any return on that AT-ST. It will just sit there and collect dust, until one day you really need that money. You won't be able to return it, and you'll only get a few bucks for it online because by then the Star Wars hype will be gone. Take it from a former completist and recovering collector, next year at this time you will rather have two hundred plus dollars in your account than an AT-ST model on the shelf.
  25. YodaJeff Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 18, 2001
    star 7
    Collect because you want an item, not because you expect it to go up in value in the future.

    For every example of something that has doubled or tripled in value in the past 5 years, there are a dozen items that are worth less than half their original selling prices.
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