Amph Hindsight is 20-20: Oscar Ceremonies of the Past (Disc. 1977)

Discussion in 'Community' started by Rogue1-and-a-half, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    Okay, here's an idea for a hosted discussion; look at Oscar ceremonies of the past . . . I'll post the roster and throw my comments in with bold. You take it from there.

    Using an internet random number generator, we have lit on 1962, the year in which the awards for 1961 were given.

    Let's see how this flies. I've chosen, for my own sanity to do the big five (Picture, Director, Acting and Screenplay).

    BEST PICTURE

    Fanny
    The Guns of Navarone
    The Hustler
    Judgment at Nuremberg
    West Side Story - WINNER

    Strong year, though what the hell is Fanny? Guns of Navarone is a bit out of its league here; a great film, but not on a par with Nuremberg or West Side Story. And you may recall a little known movie known as Breakfast at Tiffany's being released in 1961 . . . where's that? West Side Story is not a bad choice; neither would Tiffany's or Nuremberg be.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Charles Boyer - Fanny
    Paul Newman - The Hustler
    Maximilian Schell - Judgment at Nuremberg - WINNER
    Spencer Tracy - Judgment at Nuremberg
    Stuart Whitman - The Mark

    Tracy is Tracy, Newman is Newman, Whitman is who? Schell definitely deserved the award of the group listed here; his performance was a masterwork, ethical dilemma, personal demons and all. But where the heck is Clark Gable who gave a killer performance in The Misfits? He should definitely take the place of Boyer or Whitman or even Tracy. And call me crazy, but if La Dolce Vita was eligible for Best Director then Marcello Mastroianni should have been nominated for best actor. Hell, he should have won; his performance in La Dolce Vita is probably the single greatest film performance of all time and I do not say that lightly, trust me.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Audrey Hepburn - Breakfast at Tiffany's
    Piper Laurie - The Hustler
    Sophia Loren - La Ciociara - WINNER
    Natalie Wood - Splendor in the Grass
    Geraldine Page - Summer and Smoke

    Wood is a revelation in Splendor, that's for sure, but Hepburn's performance has stood the test of time best, I think, though I admit to having not seen Loren's film. Hepburn's work here is her best, I think; dense, psychological, absolutely entrancing.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    George Chakiris - West Side Story - WINNER
    Montgomery Clift - Judgment at Nuremberg
    Peter Falk - Pocketful of Miracles
    Jackie Gleason - The Hustler
    George C. Scott - The Hustler

    Scott refused the nominated, still ticked off over his shameful loss in 1959. Oddly, Clift was much better in another film that the Academy chose to utterly ignore, The Misfits, than he was in Nuremberg. He ought to have been nominated for that one. And while we're talking about The Misfits, Eli Wallach's performance in that film is easily his finest hour and one of the top ten performances of the entire decade if you ask me, so why on earth was he not nominated? Please. Idiots. And while we're on the problems, I thought Russ Tamblyn was much better than Chakiris in West Side Story; if someone from that film had to win, it should have been Tamblyn . . . should have been Wallach, bottom line though. Troubling category.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Fay Bainter - The Children's Hour
    Judy Garland - Judgment at Nuremberg
    Lotte Lenya - The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone
    Una Merkel - Summer and Smoke
    Rita Moreno - West Side Story - WINNER

    None of these are what you'd call great, I think, but Moreno was best, I guess.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Federico Fellini - La Dolce Vita
    Stanley Kramer - Judgment at Nuremberg
    Robert Rossen - The Hustler
    J. Lee Thompson - The Guns of Navarone
    Robert Wise; Jerome Robbins - West Side Story - WINNERS

    As great as the direction was in West Side, Fellini is the big fish here and Dolce Vita is a masterpiece. Should have won.

    BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

    Ballada o Soldate
    La Dolce Vita
    Il Generale della Rovere
    Lover Come Back
    Splendor in the Grass - WINNER

    Again, when you've got a Fellini film, these awards should be a lot easier than they seem to be.

    BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
  2. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    Fun, fun, fun. :D

    BEST PICTURE

    Fanny
    The Guns of Navarone
    The Hustler
    Judgment at Nuremberg
    West Side Story - WINNER

    "Fanny" is a remake of two old 30's French films directed by Marcel Pagnol: "Marius" & "Cesar". I saw some of it once--"Fanny", that is. It no only stinks, it's directed by Joshua Logan, never a good sign.

    "The Guns of Navarone" is entertaining enough.

    "West Side Story" features terrific dancing, and a bad script.

    "Judgment at Nuremberg" I haven't seen, but anything directed by Stanley Kramer is at an automatic disadvantage with me.

    "The Hustler" would be my choice.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Charles Boyer - Fanny - In the Cesar role. No.
    Paul Newman - The Hustler
    Maximilian Schell - Judgment at Nuremberg - WINNER
    Spencer Tracy - Judgment at Nuremberg
    Stuart Whitman - The Mark

    I've seen a bit of "The Mark." Not good. Newman would be my choice.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Audrey Hepburn - Breakfast at Tiffany's
    Piper Laurie - The Hustler
    Sophia Loren - La Ciociara - WINNER
    Natalie Wood - Splendor in the Grass
    Geraldine Page - Summer and Smoke

    Loren is very good; I think this was a good choice.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    George Chakiris - West Side Story - WINNER
    Montgomery Clift - Judgment at Nuremberg
    Peter Falk - Pocketful of Miracles
    Jackie Gleason - The Hustler
    George C. Scott - The Hustler

    Scott should have won.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Fay Bainter - The Children's Hour
    Judy Garland - Judgment at Nuremberg
    Lotte Lenya - The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone
    Una Merkel - Summer and Smoke
    Rita Moreno - West Side Story - WINNER

    Seen "The Children's Hour". :p. I guess Moreno is the best of a bad lot.


    BEST DIRECTOR

    Federico Fellini - La Dolce Vita
    Stanley Kramer - Judgment at Nuremberg
    Robert Rossen - The Hustler
    J. Lee Thompson - The Guns of Navarone
    Robert Wise; Jerome Robbins - West Side Story - WINNERS

    Agree it should have been Fellini, then Rossen.

    BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

    Ballada o Soldate
    La Dolce Vita
    Il Generale della Rovere
    Lover Come Back
    Splendor in the Grass - WINNER

    A very tough category, in which the least deserving film won.

    BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

    Breakfast at Tiffany's
    The Guns of Navarone
    The Hustler
    Judgment at Nuremberg
    West Side Story

    "The Hustler" would be my choice.
  3. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6
    Great idea for a thread, Rogue.

    Can't really comment on this year, though, as I have only seen West Side Story and Guns of Navarone, both a long time ago.
  4. Zombi_2_1979 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2005
    star 4
    I share TBM's thoughts, a great thread.
  5. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    Oh yes, hopefully this will be as much fun as the old "Oscar Snubs" thread.

    Odd how some films famous in their day just disappear.
  6. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6

    Absolutely. I always think that when I'm going through old awards lists. Even some films that win seem to have slipped to obscurity.
  7. Zombi_2_1979 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2005
    star 4
    I blame it entirely on popular culture, which elevates and discards indiscriminately.

    For example, my current darling, film noir has fallen into obscurity, yet popular culture has elevated several titles such as Double Indemnity, Touch of Evil, or a few Bogart titles. Not that they're undeserving but the estimates number between 300-1000 titles, sure there will be turkeys but if the distributors opened their vaults and put on DVD, the essentials list I am working on would undoubtly number in the hundreds.

    Sure, I confess, this post has some personal principals ingrained. :p :p


    RIP Mickey Spillane!
  8. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    Undoubtedly some films get reputations, and some films don't, and there seems to be no rhyme nor reason behind it.
  9. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    A lot of great movies are forgotten and a lot of bad ones are remembered. It's inexplicable.

    YEAR: 1945

    BEST PICTURE

    Anchors Aweigh
    The Bells of St. Mary's
    The Lost Weekend - WINNER
    Mildred Pierce
    Spellbound

    Spellbound is a lesser Hitchcock, the others I haven't seen. But Lost Weekend is surely one of the finest films ever made. It's far from an injustice.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE:

    Bing Crosby - The Bell's of St. Mary's
    Gene Kelly - Anchors Aweigh
    The Lost Weekend - Ray Milland - WINNER
    Gregory Peck - The Keys of the Kingdom
    Cornel Wilde - A Song to Remember

    I've only seen The Lost Weekend here. But I think they probably picked the wrong Peck; Keys of the Kingdom he plays a missionary, which he could do in his sleep. In Spellbound, on the other hand, he came off as menacing and off balance, something he rarely played.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE:

    Ingrid Bergman - The Bells of St. Mary's
    Joan Crawford - Mildred Pierce - WINNER
    Greer Garson - Valley of Decision
    Jennifer Jones - Love Letters
    Gene Tierney - Leave Her to Heaven

    Haven't seen any of these. But where the heck is Ann Savage who gave one of the greatest female performances of all time as the absolutely dominant femme fatale in Detour, a film that was rather stagy and forgettable, except when Savage was on screen.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE:

    John Dall - The Corn is Green
    James Dunn - A Tree Grows in Brooklyn - WINNER
    Michael Chekhov - Spellbound
    Robert Mitchum - The Story of G.I. Joe
    J. Carrol Naish - A Medal for Benny

    Naish was an imitator, not an actor. Having seen only Spellbound (and not being that impressed with Chekhov), I have to say Mitchum probably deserved this one.

    But again, we're missing a great performance: George Sanders as the charming, amoral and utterly hilarious as Lord Wotton in The Picture of Dorian Gray. The final scene in the film is probably Sanders best acting job, bitter, frightened, even, dare we say, repentant. He ought to be in here.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE:

    Eve Arden - Mildred Pierce
    Ann Blyth - Mildred Pierce
    Angela Lansbury - The Picture of Dorian Gray
    Joan Lorring - The Corn is Green
    Anne Revere - National Velvet - WINNER

    Lansbury was excellent in her role in Dorian Gray and very good in National Velvet, but Revere absolutely stole the show in National Velvet as Taylor's dry and witty mother. Definitely the right person won this time out.

    BEST DIRECTOR:

    Clarence Brown - National Velvet
    Alfred Hitchcock - Spellbound
    Leo McCarey - The Bells of St. Mary's
    Jean Renoir - The Southerner
    Billy Wilder - The Lost Weekend - WINNER

    Both Wilder and Hitchcock (still in his early days when he was actually being nominated for things) do great things. Wilder puts us inside the head of his main character and it's a brooding, menacing film. Hitch's film is more fanciful, I suppose; there's a Dali dream sequence and a camera shot that follows a gun late in the game, concluding in a gunshot in color against the black and white. Both are very good.

    I've decided to drop the writing awards, unless someone feels strongly about it. :p
  10. Zombi_2_1979 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2005
    star 4
    Ann Savage is indeed great in the poverty row cult film noir classic Detour.

    But you are forgetting Joan Bennett in Scarlet Street, oh man, I wonder how many aspiring bitches (pardon the French) have adopted this actress as a role model from this film noir?

    She is so good at being a bitch it's pretty damn near inspirational.

    Difficult one to surpass. I shake my head at night why I didn't give this film a perfect five stars then realize I had some sound reasons. Tremendous performance that should have been nominated.

    Oh, tell me you've seen this Fritz Lang film, Rogue?
  11. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9

    BEST PICTURE

    Anchors Aweigh
    The Bells of St. Mary's
    The Lost Weekend - WINNER
    Mildred Pierce
    Spellbound

    "The Lost Weekend" is the best of this lot.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE:

    Bing Crosby - The Bell's of St. Mary's
    Gene Kelly - Anchors Aweigh
    The Lost Weekend - Ray Milland - WINNER
    Gregory Peck - The Keys of the Kingdom
    Cornel Wilde - A Song to Remember

    I've seen the first three, and Milland deserved his award.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE:

    Ingrid Bergman - The Bells of St. Mary's
    Joan Crawford - Mildred Pierce - WINNER
    Greer Garson - Valley of Decision
    Jennifer Jones - Love Letters
    Gene Tierney - Leave Her to Heaven

    I've seen the first two and the fifth. Gene Tierney was extremely interesting in a weird role.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE:

    John Dall - The Corn is Green
    James Dunn - A Tree Grows in Brooklyn - WINNER
    Michael Chekhov - Spellbound
    Robert Mitchum - The Story of G.I. Joe
    J. Carrol Naish - A Medal for Benny

    I would vote Mitchum, too, but I have heard Dunn was very good; haven't seen the film.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE:

    Eve Arden - Mildred Pierce
    Ann Blyth - Mildred Pierce
    Angela Lansbury - The Picture of Dorian Gray
    Joan Lorring - The Corn is Green
    Anne Revere - National Velvet - WINNER

    Have to disagree; I've have voted for Ann Blyth as the spawn who prompts one of filmdom's famous wisecracks: "Alligators have the right idea; they eat their young."

    BEST DIRECTOR:

    Clarence Brown - National Velvet
    Alfred Hitchcock - Spellbound
    Leo McCarey - The Bells of St. Mary's
    Jean Renoir - The Southerner
    Billy Wilder - The Lost Weekend - WINNER

    Haven't seen the Renoir; Wilder is a good choice here, though.
  12. Zombi_2_1979 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2005
    star 4
    I have Mildred Pierce and Leave Her to Heaven on DVD, just haven't gotten around to seeing them yet. Well, I have watched about half way through Pierce.
  13. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    Zombi, I think there are four other Lang films starring Joan Bennett, in particular, "The Woman in the Window" with almost the same cast as "Scarlett Street."
  14. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6
    I'm out of my league - I've never seen any of these films.
  15. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    No, haven't seen Scarlet Street yet . . . I'm using Wikipedia to catch up on what films were released when, and I noted Scarlet Street in the list.

    On ze list. :p
  16. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    I obviously have to get a copy of "Detour" since you both agree it's worth it.
  17. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    I actually think the film itself is a little goofy, but Savage is absolutely emasculating; there have been more attractive femme fatales, but rarely a more dominant one. Certainly notable for setting a lot of templates, but many of its imitators were genuinely better films.

    And it's not very long, so it evens out. :p
  18. Zombi_2_1979 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2005
    star 4
    Detour suffers from contrivances and one big plot twist that depends entirely on coincidence. Not bad, however, on DVD -- Image Entertainment is getting these killer film noir titles such as this one, Blonde Ice, Too Late For Tears, etc and will soon be releasing Dark City but the condition is usually just a step above the generic brands.

    But scratches and dirt aside, Detour is worthwhile, institutional even, if not abit overrated by some circles that bow before it.

    Rogue, prepare yourself for one heap of serious whoop*** in Scarlet Street. This film sent Detour to the playground. Joan Bennett is amazing and Dan Duryea as her pimp, what losers.
  19. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    Looking forward to Scarlet Street.

    YEAR: 1949

    BEST PICTURE

    All the King's Men - WINNER
    Battleground
    The Heiress
    A Letter to Three Wives
    Twelve O'Clock High

    Haven't seen any of these. They're all, by the way, on my list

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Broderick Crawford - All the King's Men - WINNER
    Kirk Douglas - Champion
    Richard Todd - The Hasty Heart
    John Wayne - Sands of Iwo Jima
    Gregory Peck - Twelve O'Clock High

    Never seen any of these (all on my list, except The Hasty Heart).


    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Jeanne Crain - Pinky
    Olivia de Havilland - The Heiress - WINNER
    Susan Hayward - My Foolish Heart
    Deborah Kerr - Edward, My Son
    Loretta Young - Come to the Stable

    Never seen any of these (The Heiress is on my list . . . the others not so much) but Adam's Rib was 1949, so I wonder where Kat Hepburn is. Also, Catherine O'Donnell who was absolutely luminous as the fragile, doomed Keechie in They Live By Night.

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

    John Ireland - All the King's Men
    Dean Jagger - Twelve O'Clock High - WINNER
    Arthur Kennedy - Champion
    Ralph Richardson - The Heiress
    James Whitmore - Battleground

    David Wayne (who was sidesplittingly funny in his scene stealing role in Adam's Rib as the fey next door neighbor to Hepburn and Tracy) certainly deserved something.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Ethel Barrymore - Pinky
    Celeste Holm - Come to the Stable
    Elsa Lanchester - Come to the Stable
    Mercedes McCambridge - All the King's Men - WINNER
    Ethel Waters - Pinky

    Never saw any of these, but anything that gets McCambridge an Oscar is absolutely just perfectly fine with me.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Joseph Mankiewicz - A Letter to Three Wives - WINNER
    CArol Reed - The Fallen Idol
    Robert Rossen - All the King's Men
    William Wellman - Battleground
    William Wyler - The Heiress

    Never seen any of these.

    It should be noted that The Third Man, not seeing an American release until 1950, was not eligible for any awards this year.

    I have therefore refrained from commenting on it, despite it's release in 1949 in the UK. When we get to 1950, I'll have some pointed comments, but for now, I'll leave it.

  20. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    BEST PICTURE

    All the King's Men - WINNER
    Battleground
    The Heiress
    A Letter to Three Wives
    Twelve O'Clock High

    I've seen ATKM & ALTTW & "The Heiress". The latter was really good, but it's a character study; probably too small scale for the Academy. ALTTW is campy and bitchy in the best Mankewicz style.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Broderick Crawford - All the King's Men - WINNER
    Kirk Douglas - Champion
    Richard Todd - The Hasty Heart
    John Wayne - Sands of Iwo Jima
    Gregory Peck - Twelve O'Clock High

    Crawford is good, and so is Douglas, but hey, where's James Cagney in "White Heat?"
    The middle-aged psychopath who sits on his mom's lap?

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Jeanne Crain - Pinky
    Olivia de Havilland - The Heiress - WINNER
    Susan Hayward - My Foolish Heart
    Deborah Kerr - Edward, My Son
    Loretta Young - Come to the Stable

    I've only seen "The Heiress" and de Havilland was really remarkable.

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

    John Ireland - All the King's Men
    Dean Jagger - Twelve O'Clock High - WINNER
    Arthur Kennedy - Champion
    Ralph Richardson - The Heiress
    James Whitmore - Battleground

    Ralph Richardson was excellent.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Ethel Barrymore - Pinky
    Celeste Holm - Come to the Stable
    Elsa Lanchester - Come to the Stable
    Mercedes McCambridge - All the King's Men - WINNER
    Ethel Waters - Pinky

    Haven't seen "Come to the Stable", but I agree re: McCambridge.


    BEST DIRECTOR

    Joseph Mankiewicz - A Letter to Three Wives - WINNER
    CArol Reed - The Fallen Idol
    Robert Rossen - All the King's Men
    William Wellman - Battleground
    William Wyler - The Heiress

    Oh, come on, this is ridiculous. The other four are all good directors, and I didn't much like ALTTW. And no Raoul Walsh for "White Heat", either.
  21. Zombi_2_1979 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2005
    star 4
    Need to collect my thoughts more, but have to admit Twelve O'Clock High and Battleground deserved their nominations especially Twelve O'Clock High, a highly rousing film about men in war pushed to the very limits of courage.

    Gregory Peck deserved a best actor nomination for it.

    Rogue, if you have a Best Buy store in your parts, both DVDs in the War/Western aisles can be had for a mere $10 apiece. In fact nearly half of my film noir titles were purchased at the store at the same affordable prices.

    BTW, get the Kino Video version of Scarlet Street available at online retailers such as Amazon, B&N, etc.

    Haven't seen Carol Reed's The Fallen Idol yet neither have I seen many of these films listed for 1949.
  22. Zombi_2_1979 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2005
    star 4
    Twelve O'Clock High is my very favorite classic war film. Jingoism and melodrama are absolutely absent, two facets that were so prevalent in war films of this day.

    Twelve O'Clock High has some of the most graphic dialogue designed to give it a great deal more realism and depth. This is simply a depiction of men dealing with war, that has gone beyond the normal call of duty, through various means, and the stress upon leaders through logistical nightmares, incompetence, and suicide missions.

    My current top three classic war films stands as 1. Twelve O'Clock High 2. They Were Expendable 3. The Longest Day. Difficult not to list The Bridge on the River Kwai somewhere here but oh well.

    I think everyone that enjoys war films would have no difficulty admiring this one.
  23. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    YEAR: 1964

    BEST PICTURE

    Becket
    Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
    Mary Poppins
    My Fair Lady - WINNER
    Zorba the Greek

    Right, right, right. Where exactly is A Hard Day's Night? That said, My Fair Lady is fun, but I'd have voted for Strangelove.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Michael Cacoyannis - Zorba the Greek
    George Cukor - My Fair Lady - WINNER
    Peter Glenville - Becket
    Stanley Kubrick - Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
    Robert Stevenson - Mary Poppins

    Again, Richard Lester, anyone? Talk about a great vision. But then Cukor is never a bad choice for director.

    BEST ACTOR

    Richard Burton - Becket
    Rex Harrison - My Fair Lady - WINNER
    Peter O'Toole - Becket
    Peter Sellers - Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
    Anthony Quinn - Zorba the Greek

    Sellers was also in the brilliant Pink Panther that year, but Harrison is a definite joy. I think he's very worthy of the win.

    BEST ACTRESS

    Julie Andrews - Mary Poppins - WINNER
    Anne Bancroft - The Pumpkin Eater
    Sophia Loren - Marriage, Italian Style
    Debbie Reynolds - The Unsinkable Molly Brown
    Kim Stanley - Seance on a Wet Afternoon

    Only ever seen Mary Poppins; Marriage, Italian Style, which also features Marcello Mastroianni, one of my favorite actors ever, I still haven't seen. The others I probably won't ever see. :p Too bad De Havilland didn't get a nod for her rather uncharacteristic turn in Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte.

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

    John Gielgud - Becket
    Stanley Holloway - My Fair Lady
    Edmond O'Brien - Seven Days in May
    Lee Tracy - The Best Man
    Peter Ustinov - Topkapi - WINNER

    Sad; I've seen none of these, except My Fair Lady, but Ustinov is a great actor. So is Gielgud. Never heard of The Best Man; all the others are on my list to see. Too bad that Joseph Cotton, always good, didn't get a nom for his bit in Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte. Not his best work, but still . . .

    But the real injustice here: George C. Scott from Strangelove. Sidesplitting comedy is not something you'd think Scott could do necessarily (I'm not saying we wouldn't get our hair mussed!), but he's brilliant. Just one more reason for him to hate the Academy, I guess, because he definitely deserved a nomination.


    BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

    Gladys Cooper - My Fair Lady
    Edith Evans - The Chalk Garden
    Grayson Hall - The Night of the Iguana
    Lila Kedrova - Zorba the Greek - WINNER
    Agnes Moorehead - Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte

    I've seen only My Fair Lady and Sweet Charlotte, but it seems obvious to me that Moorehead was the one this year. By the way . . . The Chalk Garden?

    The one thing this is reminding me of; just how many films I still want to see; Topkapi, Becket, Zorba the Greek, Marriage Italian Style, Seven Days in May, Night of the Iguana . . .


  24. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    BEST PICTURE

    Becket
    Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
    Mary Poppins
    My Fair Lady - WINNER
    Zorba the Greek

    It has to be "Dr. Strangelove"

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Michael Cacoyannis - Zorba the Greek
    George Cukor - My Fair Lady - WINNER
    Peter Glenville - Becket
    Stanley Kubrick - Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
    Robert Stevenson - Mary Poppins

    Cukor is a good director, but definitely Kubrick.

    BEST ACTOR

    Richard Burton - Becket
    Rex Harrison - My Fair Lady - WINNER
    Peter O'Toole - Becket
    Peter Sellers - Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
    Anthony Quinn - Zorba the Greek

    I would have voted for Sellers in "The Pink Panther" in which he gave a rare performance (as opposed to an impersonation). But Harrison is quite brilliant and a good choice.

    BEST ACTRESS

    Julie Andrews - Mary Poppins - WINNER
    Anne Bancroft - The Pumpkin Eater
    Sophia Loren - Marriage, Italian Style
    Debbie Reynolds - The Unsinkable Molly Brown
    Kim Stanley - Seance on a Wet Afternoon

    Yes, de Havilland was good, but I also liked Audrey Hepburn, unfairly blamed for Andrews not getting the movie of "My Fair Lady." But I would vote for Sophia Loren.

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

    John Gielgud - Becket
    Stanley Holloway - My Fair Lady
    Edmond O'Brien - Seven Days in May
    Lee Tracy - The Best Man
    Peter Ustinov - Topkapi - WINNER

    I've seen the first four, but have to admit, the only performance I recall is Stanley Holloway, who is terrific.

    Scott is great, yes, but what about Sterling Hayden as General Ripper? He's really convincing.

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

    Gladys Cooper - My Fair Lady
    Edith Evans - The Chalk Garden
    Grayson Hall - The Night of the Iguana
    Lila Kedrova - Zorba the Greek - WINNER
    Agnes Moorehead - Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte

    Gladys Cooper, and I haven't seen "The Chalk Garden" or "Iguana"
  25. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6
    It's got to be Strangelove for every category it was nominated for, and for one it wasn't (Best supporting actor).

    "Now, Dmitri, you remember how we always talked about the possibility of something going wrong with the bomb. The atomic bomb, Dmitri."