Amph Hindsight is 20-20: Oscar Ceremonies of the Past (Disc. 1977)

Discussion in 'Community' started by Rogue1-and-a-half, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    A very good year indeed.

    YEAR: 1955

    BEST PICTURE

    Love is a Many-Splendored Thing
    Marty - WINNER
    Mister Roberts
    Picnic
    The Rose Tattoo

    Night of the Hunter is flawed, but it should be nominated. Also, where's The Man from Laramie? Of these, Marty is great and I've not seen the others.

    "Love" is a soap. "Roberts" suffered from a change of directors mid-way, and from being stage-bound. "Marty" is okay. "Picnic" is a very odd film, and I haven't seen it in awhile. Not seen "Tattoo". "The Night of the Hunter" should be included; also "Kiss Me Deadly", "The Ladykillers", and perhaps "The Dam Busters" and "Moonfleet"(two more I haven't seen since I was 10)

    BEST ACTOR

    Ernest Borgnine - Marty - WINNER
    James Cagney - Love Me Or Leave Me
    James Dean - East of Eden
    Frank Sinatra - The Man With the Golden Arm
    Spencer Tracy - Bad Day at Black Rock

    Borgnine is outstanding in Marty; Stewart deserved a nomination for Man from Laramie and so did Mitchum for Night of the Hunter, but the proper one probably took the prize.

    Dean, of those nominated, though Borgnine is good. It should have been Mitchum, though, and Ralph Meeker ("Kiss Me Deadly") and Robert Ryan ("Bad Day at Black Rock") should have had noms.

    BEST ACTRESS

    Susan Hayward - I'll Cry Tomorrow
    Katharine Hepburn - Summertime
    Jennifer Jones - Love is a Many-Splendored Thing
    Anna Magnani - The Rose Tattoo - WINNER
    Eleanor Parker - Interrupted Melody

    Seen none of these. Where's Lillian Gish for Night of the Hunter though?

    Seen the Hepburn film--she's very good. Saw only part of the Jones film. Bleah. Novak was good in Picnic, as the small town beauty.

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

    Arthur Kennedy - Trial
    Jack Lemmon - Mister Roberts - WINNER
    Joe Mantell - Marty
    Sal Mineo - Rebel Without a Cause
    Arthur O'Connell - Picnic

    Mineo is good, but Joe Mantell is absolutely brilliant. It's a surprisingly complex character and he plays it well. I haven't seen Trial, but Kennedy was brilliant in the Man from Laramie. Also, I'd prefer to have Jim Backus as the nominee from Rebel Without a Cause. A surprisingly effective and poignant performance.

    Mantell was good, as was the cast of "Black Day"

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

    Betsy Blair - Marty
    Peggy Lee - Pete Kelly's Blues
    Marisa Pavan - The Rose Tattoo
    Jo Van Fleet - East of Eden - WINNER
    Natalie Wood - Rebel Without a Cause

    Seen only Marty and Rebel Without a Cause; Blair was better.

    Katy Johnson in "The Ladykillers" or Gish in "The Night of the Hunter"

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Elia Kazan - East of Eden
    David Lean - Summertime
    Joshua Logan - Picnic
    Delbert Mann - Marty - WINNER
    John Sturges - Bad Day at Black Rock

    Seen only Marty. But Laughton should have taken it this year for his Southern Gothic take on Night of the Hunter.

    Of those nominated, Sturges, or maybe Lean. Laughton was inexperienced and it showed at times, but he was not afraid, so a nom there. Robert Aldrich for "Kiss Me Deadly." Not Hitchcock: "Thief" is lightweight, and "Harry" is a rare bore. Lang for "Moonfleet". I loved Hawks' "Land of the Pharaohs", which has a bravura ending. Mann for "The Man From Laramie". Lots of great foreign films this year: Dreyer's "Ordet", Bergman's "Smiles of a Summer Night", "Nuit et Brouillard", Clouzot's "Diabolique", Fellini's "Nights of Cabiria" and "Il Bidone"; Ophuls' "Lola Montez".

    BEST ORIGINAL SONG

    I'll Never Stop Loving You - Love Me Or Leave Me
    Love is a Many-Splendored Thing - Love is a Many-Splendored Thing - WINNER
    Something's Gotta Give - Daddy Long Legs
    The Tender Trap - The Tender Trap
    Unchained Melody - Unchained

    Unchained Melody and the winner are both icons, but neither are that great really. The best this year by far was The Tender Trap, which is both perverse and funny.

    You're the expert here.

    BEST SCORE

    Battle Cry - Max Steiner
    Love is a Many-Splendored Thing - Alfred Newman - WINNER
    The Man With the Golden Arm - Elmer Be
  2. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    YEAR: 1927/1928

    This was the very first Oscar ceremony.

    BEST PICTURE, UNIQUE AND ARTISTIC PRODUCTION

    Chang: A Drama of the Wilderness
    The Crowd
    Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans - WINNER

    BEST PICTURE, PRODUCTION

    The Racket
    Seventh Heaven
    Wings - WINNER

    From the outset, let me say I've seen not many films from these two years. However, the lack of Keaton is ludicrous. Steamboat Bill, Jr. is not Keaton's best film and probably should have taken this prize, probably the production one. As to what exactly is up with the two best picture awards, you got me? Also, they start early ignoring great foreign films; where's Passion of Joan of Arc and October?

    BEST ACTOR

    Richard Barthelmess - The Noose/The Patent Leather Kid
    Emil Jannings - The Last Command/The Way of All Flesh - WINNER

    This is odd, having an actor nominated for two roles each. So Keaton would fit right in here for Steamboat Bill and The General.

    BEST ACTRESS

    Louise Dresser - A Ship Comes In
    Janet Gaynor - Seventh Heaven - WINNER
    Gloria Swanson - Sadie Thompson

    Maria Falconetti gave one of the performances of all time in Passion of Joan of Arc. Now way Janet friggin' Gaynor beats her out.

    BEST DIRECTOR, COMEDY PICTURE

    Two Arabian Knights - Lewis Milestone - WINNER
    Speedy - Ted Wilde

    Charles Reisner for Steamboat Bill Jr.

    BEST DIRECTOR, DRAMATIC PICTURE

    Seventh Heaven - Frank Borzage - WINNER
    Sorrell and Son - Herbert Brenon
    The Crowd - King Vidor

    Passion of Joan of Arc again.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE

    A Girl in Every Port
    A Race for Life
    A Woman of Affairs
    Anna Karenina
    Barbed Wire
    Beggars of Life
    College
    Fireman Save My Child
    Flesh and the Devil
    Fox Movietone News: Jenkins Orphanage Band
    Get Your Man
    Hills of Kentucky
    Hotel Imperial
    Hula
    In Old Kentucky
    It
    King of Kings
    La Passion de Jeanne D'Arc
    Laugh, Clown, Laugh
    Lilac Time
    Long Pants
    Love
    Man, Woman and Sin
    Metropolis
    My Best Girl
    Napoleon
    October
    Old San Francisco
    Orchids and Ermine
    Our Dancing Daughters
    Pandora's Box
    Pass the Gravy
    Potomok Chingis-Khana
    Power of the Press
    Quality Street
    Queen Kelly
    Rinty of the Desert
    Seventh Heaven
    Show People
    Steamboat Bill, Jr.
    Steamboat Willie
    Street Angel
    Tearin' Into Trouble
    The Beloved Rogue
    The Broadway Melody
    The Callahans and the Murphys
    The Cameraman
    The Cardboard Lover
    The Cat and the Canary
    The Circus
    The Divine Woman
    The Docks of New York
    The Fair Co-Ed
    The Fall of the House of Usher
    The Four Feathers
    The Gaucho
    The General
    The Jazz Singer
    The Kid Brother
    The Last Trail
    The Life and Death of 1913 - A Hollywood Extra
    The Man Who Laughs
    The Masks of the Devil
    The Mysterious Lady
    The Patsy
    The Red Mill
    The Singing Fool
    The Student Prince in Old Heidelberg
    The Twenty-Four Dollar Island
    The Unknown, London After Midnight
    The Wedding March
    The Wind
    There It Is
    Tillie's Punctured Romance
    Tracked by the Police
    Tumbleweeds
    Un Chien Andalou
    Underworld
    West of Zanzibar
    Westinghouse Works
    White Shadow in the South Seas
  3. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    BEST PICTURE, UNIQUE AND ARTISTIC PRODUCTION

    Chang: A Drama of the Wilderness
    The Crowd
    Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans - WINNER

    BEST PICTURE, PRODUCTION

    The Racket
    Seventh Heaven
    Wings - WINNER

    From the outset, let me say I've seen not many films from these two years. However, the lack of Keaton is ludicrous. Steamboat Bill, Jr. is not Keaton's best film and probably should have taken this prize, probably the production one. As to what exactly is up with the two best picture awards, you got me? Also, they start early ignoring great foreign films; where's Passion of Joan of Arc and October?

    Also "Napoleon", "Metropolis", "October", "Pandora's Box" "The Circus", "The General", "The Wind" etc. I have seen "Sunrise" (which is brilliant); and "The Crowd" (which I didn't much like).

    BEST ACTOR

    Richard Barthelmess - The Noose/The Patent Leather Kid
    Emil Jannings - The Last Command/The Way of All Flesh - WINNER

    This is odd, having an actor nominated for two roles each. So Keaton would fit right in here for Steamboat Bill and The General.

    In those days, they could nominate on your whole work for the year. That said, haven't seen any of these movies. I think "The Last Command" was directed by von Sternberg.

    BEST ACTRESS

    Louise Dresser - A Ship Comes In
    Janet Gaynor - Seventh Heaven - WINNER
    Gloria Swanson - Sadie Thompson

    Maria Falconetti gave one of the performances of all time in Passion of Joan of Arc. Now way Janet friggin' Gaynor beats her out.

    I agree, though I know Gaynor is far more effective in silent pictures, as she has an awful voice. She also starred in "Sunrise", in which she is excellent. What about Louise Brooks and Lillian Gish?

    BEST DIRECTOR, COMEDY PICTURE

    Two Arabian Knights - Lewis Milestone - WINNER
    Speedy - Ted Wilde
    Charles Reisner for Steamboat Bill Jr.

    I saw "Two Arabian Knights" on TCM. It's about two WWI POWs (American), who escape from Germany and end up in Turkey. It's highly enjoyable and funny. "Steamboat Bill" is, of course, a masterpiece.

    BEST DIRECTOR, DRAMATIC PICTURE

    Seventh Heaven - Frank Borzage - WINNER
    Sorrell and Son - Herbert Brenon
    The Crowd - King Vidor

    Passion of Joan of Arc again.

    And Napoleon, Metropolis, etc.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE

    A Girl in Every Port (This is dir. by Hawks, I think, and stars Brooks)
    Beggars of Life (starring Louise Brooks, dir. Wellman)
    College (Keaton comedy)
    Flesh and the Devil (famous Garbo melodrama)
    Hotel Imperial (dir. by Stiller, script by Furthman)
    It (famous Clara Bow comedy)
    La Passion de Jeanne D'Arc (dir. by Dreyer)
    Laugh, Clown, Laugh (dir. by Brenon, starring Chaney)
    Long Pants (Laughton comedy)
    Love (Garbo)
    Metropolis (dir. by Lang)
    My Best Girl (comedy with Pickford)
    Napoleon (dir. by Gance)
    October (dir. by Sergei Eisenstein)
    Orchids and Ermine (comedy)
    Our Dancing Daughters (ditto)
    Pandora's Box (famous film starring Louise Brooks)
    Queen Kelly (dir. by von Stroheim, but unfinished)
    Show People (comedy with Marion Davies)
    Street Angel (also with Gaynor, I think)
    The Broadway Melody (first sound musical)
    The Cat and the Canary (horror comedy)
    The Circus (Chaplin)
    The Docks of New York (von Sternberg again, I think)
    The Fair Co-Ed (Davies comedy)
    The Gaucho (Fairbanks, sr. comedy)
    The General (Keaton comedy)
    The Jazz Singer (first sound film)
    The Kid Brother (Very funny comedy with Lloyd)
    The Man Who Laughs (Chaney)
    The Patsy (Davies comedy)
    The Unknown, London After Midnight (Chaney, the latter film is lost)
    The Wedding March (Von Stroheim)
    The Wind (dir. by Sjostrom with Lillian Gish)
    Tumbleweeds (famous Western)
    Un Chien Andalou (Luis Bunuel)
    Underworld (Von Sternberg)
    West of Zanzibar (Chaney)
    White Shadows in the South Seas (famous movie dir. by Woody van Dyke)
  4. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    YEAR: 1938

    BEST PICTURE

    Alexander's Ragtime Band
    Boys Town
    Four Daughters
    La Grande Illusion
    Jezebel
    Pygmalion
    Test Pilot
    The Adventures of Robin Hood
    The Citadal
    You Can't Take It With You - WINNER

    Pygmalion and The Adventures of Robin Hood are both very good and I'll risk Zaz's ire by coming out in favor of Capra's You Can't Take It With You. But the best film this year was Bringing Up Baby, I think. At least, that I've seen. The Lady Vanishes is a close second and almost as funny.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Frank Capra - You Can't Take It With You - WINNER
    Michael Curtiz - Angels With Dirty Faces
    Michael Curtiz - Four Daughters
    Norman Taurog - Boys Town
    King Vidor - The Citadel

    Hawks for Bringing Up Baby? If not, then Curtiz for Robin Hood.

    BEST ACTOR

    Charles Boyer - Algiers
    James Cagney - Angels With Dirty Faces
    Robert Donat - The Citadel
    Leslie Howard - Pygmalion
    Spencer Tracy - Boys Town - WINNER

    I'd like to see Cary Grant from Bringing Up Baby, Michael Redgrave for The Lady Vanishes and Lionel Barrymore for You Can't Take It With You nominated. But the best performance this year was actually nominated; Howard, more acidic than you'd ever think him capable of, in Pygmalion.

    BEST ACTRESS

    Fay Bainter - White Banners
    Bette Davis - Jezebel - WINNER
    Wendy Hiller - Pygmalion
    Norma Shearer - Marie Antoinette
    Margaret Sullavan - Three Comrades

    Wendy Hiller was outstanding in Pygmalion. I'd like to have seen the prize go Margaret Lockwood for The Lady Vanishes, but I think we all know what a joke that is.

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

    Walter Brennan - Kentucky - WINNER
    John Garfield - Four Daughters
    Gene Lockhart - Algiers
    Robert Morley - Marie Antoinette
    Basil Rathbone - If I Were King

    Jimmy Stewart was excellent in his supporting role in You Can't Take It With You, though he was outclassed by Edward Arnold as his even more strait laced father. It would be nice to see Rathbone nomiated for Robin Hood, but he got a nom for another film which I haven't seen so I'll withhold judgment.

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

    Fay Bainter - Jezebel - WINNER
    Beulah Bondi - Of Human Hearts
    Billie Burke - Merrily We Live
    Spring Byington - You Can't Take It With You
    Miliza Korjus - The Great Waltz

    By far the best supporting female performance of the year was May Whitty as the hilarious and enigmatic Miss Froy in The Lady Vanishes.

    BEST SCORING

    Alexander's Ragtime Band - Alfred Newman - WINNER
    Carefree - Victor Baravalle
    Girls' School - Morris Stoloff/Gregory Stone
    Jezebel - Max Steiner
    Mad About Music - Charles Previn/Frank Skinner
    Storm Over Bengal - Cy Feuer
    Sweethearts - Herbert Stothart
    The Goldwyn Folies - Alfred Newman
    The Young in Heart - Franz Waxman
    There Goes My Heart - Marvin Hatley
    Tropic Holiday - Boris Morros

    I don't really know what the difference is between the Best Scoring and Best Score awards; I'll just comment under the other one.

    BEST ORIGINAL SONG

    Always and Always - Mannequin
    A Mist Over the Moon - The Lady Objects
    Change Partners and Dance With Me - Carefree
    Dust - Under Western Stars
    Jeepers Creepers - Going Places
    Merrily We Live - Merrily We Live
    My Own - That Certain Age
    Now It Can Be Told - Alexander's Ragtime Band
    Thanks for the Memories - The Big Broadcast of 1938 - WINNER
    The Cowboy and the Lady - The Cowboy and the Lady

    Jeepers Creepers is one of the most ludicrous songs ever written, but the proper one probably took this one.

    BEST SCORE

    Army Girl ? Victor Young
    Block-Heads ? Marvin Hatley
    Blockade ? Werner Janssen
    Breaking the Ice ? Victor Young
    If I Were King ? Richard Hageman
    Marie Antoinette ? Herbert Stothart
    Pacific Liner ? Robert Russell Bennett
    Suez ? Louis Silvers
    The Adventures of Robin Hood ? Erich Wolfgang Korngold ? WINNER
    The Cowboy and the Lady ? Alfred Newman
    The Young At Heart ? Franz Waxman

    While I'm a Korngold fan, Robin Hood, while rousing and stupendous isn't his finest work. By far the best fil
  5. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    This year gives the lie to the legend that the 30's were a golden age.

    YEAR: 1938

    BEST PICTURE

    Alexander's Ragtime Band
    Boys Town
    Four Daughters
    La Grande Illusion
    Jezebel
    Pygmalion
    Test Pilot
    The Adventures of Robin Hood
    The Citadal
    You Can't Take It With You - WINNER

    Pygmalion and The Adventures of Robin Hood are both very good and I'll risk Zaz's ire by coming out in favor of Capra's You Can't Take It With You. But the best film this year was Bringing Up Baby, I think. At least, that I've seen. The Lady Vanishes is a close second and almost as funny.

    I saw the Capra again recently, and it's slow, whimsical, and dated...IMO. Interesting that foreign films are directly in the mix here. I vote "La Grande Illusion", then "Pygmalion".

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Frank Capra - You Can't Take It With You - WINNER
    Michael Curtiz - Angels With Dirty Faces
    Michael Curtiz - Four Daughters
    Norman Taurog - Boys Town
    King Vidor - The Citadel

    Hawks for Bringing Up Baby? If not, then Curtiz for Robin Hood.

    Jean Renoir for "La Grande Illusion", then Hitchcock and Hawks and Wyler.

    BEST ACTOR

    Charles Boyer - Algiers
    James Cagney - Angels With Dirty Faces
    Robert Donat - The Citadel
    Leslie Howard - Pygmalion
    Spencer Tracy - Boys Town - WINNER

    I'd like to see Cary Grant from Bringing Up Baby, Michael Redgrave for The Lady Vanishes and Lionel Barrymore for You Can't Take It With You nominated. But the best performance this year was actually nominated; Howard, more acidic than you'd ever think him capable of, in Pygmalion.

    I agree; Howard is excellent. Scratch Barrymore, but I agree re Redgrave and Grant. Fonda's also good in "Jezebel"

    BEST ACTRESS

    Fay Bainter - White Banners
    Bette Davis - Jezebel - WINNER
    Wendy Hiller - Pygmalion
    Norma Shearer - Marie Antoinette
    Margaret Sullavan - Three Comrades

    Wendy Hiller was outstanding in Pygmalion. I'd like to have seen the prize go Margaret Lockwood for The Lady Vanishes, but I think we all know what a joke that is.

    Hiller and Lockwood were both excellent, but I have to say Davis earned it, and you know I am not a fan. Barbara Stanwyck is also good in "Remember the Night"

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

    Walter Brennan - Kentucky - WINNER
    John Garfield - Four Daughters
    Gene Lockhart - Algiers
    Robert Morley - Marie Antoinette
    Basil Rathbone - If I Were King

    Jimmy Stewart was excellent in his supporting role in You Can't Take It With You, though he was outclassed by Edward Arnold as his even more strait laced father. It would be nice to see Rathbone nomiated for Robin Hood, but he got a nom for another film which I haven't seen so I'll withhold judgment.

    Morley is really good as Louis XVI, which seems, at times, to be an actor-proof role. I am a fan of Rathbone, but haven't seen the nominated movie. Claude Rains as Prince John in "Robin Hood" was good, too.

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

    Fay Bainter - Jezebel - WINNER
    Beulah Bondi - Of Human Hearts
    Billie Burke - Merrily We Live
    Spring Byington - You Can't Take It With You
    Miliza Korjus - The Great Waltz

    By far the best supporting female performance of the year was May Whitty as the hilarious and enigmatic Miss Froy in The Lady Vanishes.

    No kidding.

    BEST SCORING

    Alexander's Ragtime Band - Alfred Newman - WINNER
    Carefree - Victor Baravalle
    Girls' School - Morris Stoloff/Gregory Stone
    Jezebel - Max Steiner
    Mad About Music - Charles Previn/Frank Skinner
    Storm Over Bengal - Cy Feuer
    Sweethearts - Herbert Stothart
    The Goldwyn Folies - Alfred Newman
    The Young in Heart - Franz Waxman
    There Goes My Heart - Marvin Hatley
    Tropic Holiday - Boris Morros

    I don't really know what the difference is between the Best Scoring and Best Score awards; I'll just comment under the other one.

    No clue here.

    BEST ORIGINAL SONG

    Always and Always - Mannequin
    A Mist Over the Moon - The Lady Objects
    Change Partners and Dance With Me - Carefree
    Dust - Under Western Stars
    Jeepers Creepers - Going Places
    Merrily We Live -
  6. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    Update? :_|

    [noise generally works]
  7. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    YEAR: 1968

    BEST PICTURE

    Funny Girl
    The Lion in Winter
    Oliver - WINNER
    Rachel, Rachel
    Romeo and Juliet

    Funny Girl is a fairly good film, if a bit long. But The Producers, The Nutty Professor, The Odd Couple, Rosemary's Baby and 2001: A Space Odyssey are all missing; the prejudice against comedy, horror and sci-fi is not a new thing, apparently. And for my money the best film this year is also missing: Once Upon a Time in the West.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Alan Arkin - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
    Alan Bates - The Fixer
    Peter O'Toole - The Lion in Winter
    Ron Moody - Oliver!
    Cliff Robertson - Charly - WINNER

    Seen none of these. But what about Jack Lemmon or Walter Matthau for The Odd Couple? And where on earth is Charles Bronson for his career best role in Once Upon a Time in the West?

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Katharine Hepburn - The Lion in Winter - WINNER
    Patricia Neal - The Subject was Roses
    Vanessa Redgrave - Isadora
    Barbra Streisand - Funny Girl - WINNER
    Joanne Woodward - Rachel, Rachel

    Seen only Funny Girl, in which Striesand was actually very good (and coming from me, you know this means she was stupendous). But Mia Farrow should have won this year for here incredibly creepy and brilliant turn in Rosemary's Baby.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Jack Albertson - The Subject Was Roses -WINNER
    Seymour Cassel - Faces
    Daniel Massey - Star!
    Jack Wild - Oliver!
    Gene Wilder - The Producers

    Gene Wilder should have took this one. Or maybe Henry Fonda for his against type villainous turn in Once Upon a Time in the West. It also would have been nice to see Cassavetes nominated for Rosemary's Baby; he had an extremely tough part and he did it well.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Lynn Carlin - Faces
    Ruth Gordon - Rosemary's Baby - WINNER
    Sondra Locke - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
    Kay Medford - Funny Girl
    Estelle Parsons - Rachel, Rachel

    Gordon was very good.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Anthony Harvey - The Lion in Winter
    Stanley Kubrick - 2001: A Space Odyssey
    Carol Reed - Oliver! - WINNER
    Gillo Pontecorvo - La Battaglia di Algeri
    Franco Zeffirelli - Romeo and Juliet

    Kubrick deserved this one, by far.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    Chitty Chitty Bang Bang - Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
    For Love of Ivy - For Love of Ivy
    Funny Girl - Funny Girl
    Star! - Star!
    The Windmills of Your Mind - The Thomas Crown Affair - WINNER

    I really despise The Windmills of Your Mind.

    BEST MUSIC, SCORE OF A MUSICAL PICTURE (ORIGINAL OR ADAPTATION)

    Les Desmoiselles de Rochefort - Michel Legrand/Jacques Demy
    Finian's Rainbow - Ray Heindorf
    Funny Girl - Walter Scharf
    Oliver! - Johnny Green - WINNER
    Star! - Lennie Hayton

    Seen only Funny Girl.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A MOTION PICTURE (NOT A MUSICAL)

    The Fox - Lalo Schifrin
    The Lion in Winter - Jerry Goldsmith - WINNER
    Planet of the Apes - Jerry Goldsmith
    The Shoes of the Fisherman - Alex North
    The Thomas Crown Affair - Michel Legrand

    Great as The Lion in Winter is . . . Planet of the Apes is far, far better and should have won this award. And Morricone's Once Upon a Time in the West should have been at least nominated.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE:

    30 is a Dangerous Age, Cynthia
    5 Card Stud
    Adieu, L'Ami
    Anzio
    Bandolero!
    Barbarella
    Bullitt
    Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell
    Bye Bye Braverman
    Candy
    Carry On Up the Khyber
    C'Era Una Volta il West
    Coogan's Bluff
    Czechoslovakia 1968
    David Holzman's Diary
    Dracula Has Risen from the Grave
    Flesh
    Greetings
    Head
    Hell in the Pacific
    Hellfighters
    High School
    Hot Millions
    Hour of the Wolf
    I Love You, Alice B. Toklas!
    Ice Station Zebra
    If . . .
    Inspector Clouseau
    Lady in Cement
    Larks on a String
    Madigan
    Memorias del Subdesarrollo
    Memories of Underdevelopment
    Night of the Living Dead
    No Way to Treat a Lady
    OffOn
    Paper Lion
    Petulia
    Pretty Poison
    Rosie!
    Seconds
    Shalako
    Shame
    She-Devils on Wheels
    Signs of Life
    Skammen
    Skidoo
  8. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    YEAR: 1968

    BEST PICTURE

    Funny Girl
    The Lion in Winter
    Oliver - WINNER
    Rachel, Rachel
    Romeo and Juliet

    Funny Girl is a fairly good film, if a bit long. But The Producers, The Nutty Professor, The Odd Couple, Rosemary's Baby and 2001: A Space Odyssey are all missing; the prejudice against comedy, horror and sci-fi is not a new thing, apparently. And for my money the best film this year is also missing: Once Upon a Time in the West.

    "The Nutty Professor" was released in 1963, not 1968. Agree about your other comments. "Oliver" was a decent musical, but Best Picture? Two very funny comedies: "Hot Millions" and "The Party". "Pretty Poison" is a good noir.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Alan Arkin - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
    Alan Bates - The Fixer
    Peter O'Toole - The Lion in Winter
    Ron Moody - Oliver!
    Cliff Robertson - Charly - WINNER

    Seen none of these. But what about Jack Lemmon or Walter Matthau for The Odd Couple? And where on earth is Charles Bronson for his career best role in Once Upon a Time in the West?

    O'Toole should have won.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Katharine Hepburn - The Lion in Winter - WINNER
    Patricia Neal - The Subject was Roses
    Vanessa Redgrave - Isadora
    Barbra Streisand - Funny Girl - WINNER
    Joanne Woodward - Rachel, Rachel

    Seen only Funny Girl, in which Striesand was actually very good (and coming from me, you know this means she was stupendous). But Mia Farrow should have won this year for here incredibly creepy and brilliant turn in Rosemary's Baby.

    Of those nominated, Redgrave, though "Isadora" is a mess. Tuesday Weld should have been nominated for "Pretty Poison."

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Jack Albertson - The Subject Was Roses -WINNER
    Seymour Cassel - Faces
    Daniel Massey - Star!
    Jack Wild - Oliver!
    Gene Wilder - The Producers

    Gene Wilder should have took this one. Or maybe Henry Fonda for his against type villainous turn in Once Upon a Time in the West. It also would have been nice to see Cassavetes nominated for Rosemary's Baby; he had an extremely tough part and he did it well.

    Wilder, of those nominated. Fonda and Cassavetes should have been nominated.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Lynn Carlin - Faces
    Ruth Gordon - Rosemary's Baby - WINNER
    Sondra Locke - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
    Kay Medford - Funny Girl
    Estelle Parsons - Rachel, Rachel

    Gordon was very good.

    Nah, she wasn't.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Anthony Harvey - The Lion in Winter
    Stanley Kubrick - 2001: A Space Odyssey
    Carol Reed - Oliver! - WINNER
    Gillo Pontecorvo - La Battaglia di Algeri
    Franco Zeffirelli - Romeo and Juliet

    Kubrick deserved this one, by far.

    Pontecorvo.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    Chitty Chitty Bang Bang - Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
    For Love of Ivy - For Love of Ivy
    Funny Girl - Funny Girl
    Star! - Star!
    The Windmills of Your Mind - The Thomas Crown Affair - WINNER

    I really despise The Windmills of Your Mind.

    No kidding, but I understand the win if the competition is "Chitty, Chitty, Bang, Bang."

    BEST MUSIC, SCORE OF A MUSICAL PICTURE (ORIGINAL OR ADAPTATION)

    Les Desmoiselles de Rochefort - Michel Legrand/Jacques Demy
    Finian's Rainbow - Ray Heindorf
    Funny Girl - Walter Scharf
    Oliver! - Johnny Green - WINNER
    Star! - Lennie Hayton

    Seen only Funny Girl.

    "Les Desmoiselles" is very pretty.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A MOTION PICTURE (NOT A MUSICAL)

    The Fox - Lalo Schifrin
    The Lion in Winter - Jerry Goldsmith - WINNER
    Planet of the Apes - Jerry Goldsmith
    The Shoes of the Fisherman - Alex North
    The Thomas Crown Affair - Michel Legrand

    Great as The Lion in Winter is . . . Planet of the Apes is far, far better and should have won this award. And Morricone's Once Upon a Time in the West should have been at least nominated.

    Morricone, though "The Lion in Winter" is not indefensible.

  9. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    YEAR: 1967

    BEST PICTURE

    Bonnie and Clyde
    Doctor Doolittle
    The Graduate
    Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
    In the Heat of the Night - WINNER

    A nice slate, if you ignore them all. :p Bonnie and Clyde is probably worthy and I still find the Graduate Brilliant. I'd slip in Wait Until Dark in place of Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, but Heat of the Night is the proper winner here.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Richard Brooks - In Cold Blood
    Norman Jewison - In the Heat of the Night
    Stanley Kramer - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
    Mike Nichols - The Graduate - WINNER
    Arthur Penn - Bonnie and Clyde

    Nichols turned in a great bit of directing though Zaz will mention the 'zeitgiest' of it all. But I think Penn probably deserves this one.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Warren Beatty - Bonnie and Clyde
    Dustin Hoffman - The Graduate
    Paul Newman - Cool Hand Luke
    Rod Steiger - In the Heat of the Night - WINNER
    Spencer Tracy - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

    Beatty and Hoffman are both brilliant; Steiger strikes me as more of a supporting role, to be honest with Poiter needing a nom for leading. I'd give the award to Hoffman, I think.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Anne Bancroft - The Graduate
    Faye Dunaway - Bonnie and Clyde
    Edith Evans - The Whisperers
    Audrey Hepburn - Wait Until Dark
    Katherine Hepburn - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner - WINNER

    The wrong Hepburn took this one; yes, I know she's playing a spunky blind girl . . . Audrey is still astoundingly great in Wait Until Dark. And Bancroft is supporting.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    John Cassavettes - The Dirty Dozen
    Gene Hackman - Bonnie and Clyde
    Cecil Kellaway - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
    George Kennedy - Cool Hand Luke - WINNER
    Michael J. Pollard - Bonnie and Clyde

    Alan Arkin should have not only been nominated, but won, for his fantastic joyous villainous performance in Wait Until Dark. That said, Hackman and Pollard are both very good, Pollard probably more so. Cassavettes wasn't that great in Dirty Dozen; Savalas deserved the nomination from that film. The less said about Guess Who's Coming to Dinner . . .

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTINGN ROLE

    Carol Channing - Thoroughly Modern Millie
    Mildred Natwick - Barefoot in the Park
    Estelle Parsons - Bonnie and Clyde - WINNER
    Beah Richards - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
    Katherine Ross - The Graduate

    Drop Katherine Ross who is, per usual, pretty bad and slip in Bancroft for the Graduate. And then give Bancroft the frigging award.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    Talk to the Animals - Doctor Doolittle
    The Bare Necessities - The Jungle Book
    The Eyes of Love - Banning
    The Look of Love - Casino Royale
    Thoroughly Modern Millie - Thoroughly Modern Millie

    The Bare Necessities.

    BEST MUSIC ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE

    Cool Hand Luke - Lalo Schifrin
    Doctor Doolittle - Leslie Briscusse
    Far From the Madding Crowd - Richard Rodney Bennett
    In Cold Blood - Quincy Jones
    Thoroughly Modern Millie - Elmer Bernstein - WINNER

    Weak year for scores


    BEST MUSIC, SCORING OF MUSIC, ADAPTATION OR TREATMENT

    Camelot - Alfred Newman/Ken Darby - WINNER
    Doctor Doolittle - Lionel Newman/Alexander Courage
    Guess Who's Coming to Dinner - Frank De Vol
    Thoroughly Modern Millie - Andre Previn/Joseph Gershenson
    Valley of the Dolls - John Williams

    And I thought the other slate was weak. Pretending this doesn't exist.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTe

    2 ou Choses Que Je Sais D'elle
    A Countess from Hong Kong
    A Guide for the Married Man
    A Taste of Blood
    Bedazzled
    Bell de Jour
    Billion Dollar Brain
    Blast-Off Girls
    Branded to Kill
    Caprice
    Charlie Bubbles
    Chimes at Midnight
    Csillagosok Katonak
    Custer of the West
    Divorce American Style
    Don't Look Back
    El Dorado
    Enter Laughing
    Fathom
    Fitzwilly
    Frankenstein Created Woman
    Gaav
    Hang 'Em High
    Harry Sundown
    Heidi
    Hombre
    Hori Ma Panenko
    Hour of the Gun
    How I Won the War
    Hurry Sundown
    I'll Never Forget What's'isname
    In Like Flint
    La Chinoise
    Le S
  10. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    YEAR: 1967

    BEST PICTURE

    Bonnie and Clyde
    Doctor Doolittle
    The Graduate
    Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
    In the Heat of the Night - WINNER

    A nice slate, if you ignore them all. tongue Bonnie and Clyde is probably worthy and I still find the Graduate Brilliant. I'd slip in Wait Until Dark in place of Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, but Heat of the Night is the proper winner here.

    Leave in "Bonnie and Clyde" and "In the Heat of the Night"; delete the rest. Substitute "Point Blank", "Le Samourai" and "Week End". "The President's Analyst" is funny, too.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Richard Brooks - In Cold Blood
    Norman Jewison - In the Heat of the Night
    Stanley Kramer - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
    Mike Nichols - The Graduate - WINNER
    Arthur Penn - Bonnie and Clyde

    Nichols turned in a great bit of directing though Zaz will mention the 'zeitgiest' of it all. But I think Penn probably deserves this one.

    Penn, or John Boorman for "Point Blank"

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Warren Beatty - Bonnie and Clyde
    Dustin Hoffman - The Graduate
    Paul Newman - Cool Hand Luke
    Rod Steiger - In the Heat of the Night - WINNER
    Spencer Tracy - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

    Beatty and Hoffman are both brilliant; Steiger strikes me as more of a supporting role, to be honest with Poiter needing a nom for leading. I'd give the award to Hoffman, I think.

    You're right about Steiger being supporting; I'd choose Robert Blake in "In Cold Blood" or Lee Marvin in "Point Blank", but Beatty or Hoffman would be fine.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Anne Bancroft - The Graduate
    Faye Dunaway - Bonnie and Clyde
    Edith Evans - The Whisperers
    Audrey Hepburn - Wait Until Dark
    Katherine Hepburn - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner - WINNER

    The wrong Hepburn took this one; yes, I know she's playing a spunky blind girl . . . Audrey is still astoundingly great in Wait Until Dark. And Bancroft is supporting.

    Audrey Hepburn, okay, but for "Two for the Road." Or Dunaway.[/link]

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    John Cassavettes - The Dirty Dozen
    Gene Hackman - Bonnie and Clyde
    Cecil Kellaway - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
    George Kennedy - Cool Hand Luke - WINNER
    Michael J. Pollard - Bonnie and Clyde

    Alan Arkin should have not only been nominated, but won, for his fantastic joyous villainous performance in Wait Until Dark. That said, Hackman and Pollard are both very good, Pollard probably more so. Cassavettes wasn't that great in Dirty Dozen; Savalas deserved the nomination from that film. The less said about Guess Who's Coming to Dinner . . .

    God, I love Cassavettes in that movie. It's ham on wry. Probably Hackman, though.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTINGN ROLE

    Carol Channing - Thoroughly Modern Millie
    Mildred Natwick - Barefoot in the Park
    Estelle Parsons - Bonnie and Clyde - WINNER
    Beah Richards - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
    Katherine Ross - The Graduate

    Drop Katherine Ross who is, per usual, pretty bad and slip in Bancroft for the Graduate. And then give Bancroft the frigging award.

    Ross is terrible; Natwick is pretty good, as is Parsons; but I agree it should have been Bancroft or Dickinson

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    Talk to the Animals - Doctor Doolittle
    The Bare Necessities - The Jungle Book
    The Eyes of Love - Banning
    The Look of Love - Casino Royale
    Thoroughly Modern Millie - Thoroughly Modern Millie

    The Bare Necessities.

    Of course. Great song, sung and presented with a lovely wit.

    BEST MUSIC ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE

    Cool Hand Luke - Lalo Schifrin
    Doctor Doolittle - Leslie Briscusse
    Far From the Madding Crowd - Richard Rodney Bennett
    In Cold Blood - Quincy Jones
    Thoroughly Modern Millie - Elmer Bernstein - WINNER

    Weak year for scores

    Couldn't say about this one.


    BEST MUSIC, SCORING OF MUSIC, ADAPTATION OR TREATMENT

    Camelot - Alfred Newman/Ken Darby - WINNER
    Doctor Doolittle - Lionel Newman/Alexander Courage
    Guess Who's Coming to Dinner - Frank De Vol
    Thoroughly Modern Millie - Andre Previn/Joseph Gershenson
    Val
  11. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    I don't know if you meant to say "Ham on wry" instead of "rye." But whether you did or not, that's classic stuff.
  12. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    I did; but a confession; I read it somewhere.
  13. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    YEAR: 1975

    BEST PICTURE

    Barry Lyndon
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Jaws
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - WINNER

    Of these, Jaws holds up the best, though Cuckoo's Nest is a great film, as is Dog Day Afternoon. At the time, it probably seemed silly, but in hindsight, no nomination for Monty Python & the Holy Grail looks completely idiotic. And, though it's certainly not a great film, I do have to show a little love to the purely fun, fun, fun Western spy romp, Breakheart Pass, probably my favorite Alistair McLean film.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Robert Altman - Nashville
    Federico Fellini - Amarcord
    Milos Forman - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - WINNER
    Stanley Kubrick - Barry Lyndon
    Sidney Lumet - Dog Day Afternoon

    Probably Lumet.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Walter Matthau - The Sunshine Boys
    Jack Nicholson - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - WINNER
    Al Pacino - Dog Day Afternoon
    Maximilian Schell - The Man in the Glass Booth
    James Whitmore - Give 'em Hell, Harry

    I'd have loved to see Roy Scheider nominated for Jaws; Dreyfuss too. But Nicholson is a force of nature; he really deserved an Oscar in 74 for Chinatown, but one can hardly quibble. Though Pacino is astounding in Dog Day Afternoon. And it would have killed them, I guess to give Tim Curry one for Rocky Horror. Yes, it would have. And a little love for Warren Beatty who gives a shockingly brilliant performance as a shallow, horrid man in Shampoo. Wouldn't have thought he had it in him.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Isabelle Adjani - L'Histoire d'Adele H.
    Louise Fletcher - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - WINNER
    Glenda Jackson - Hedda
    Carol Kane - Hester Street
    Ann-Margret - Tommy

    Fletcher was good; haven't seen the others.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    George Burns - The Sunshine Boys - WINNER
    Brad Dourif - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    Burgess Meredith - The Day of the Locust
    Chris Sarandon - Dog Day Afternoon
    Jack Warden - Shampoo

    I didn't like anything about Dog Day Afternoon, least of all, Meredith's horrifying Vaudevillian performance. Sarandon was good in his brief part in Dog Day Afternoon, but I think Cazale was better. Dourif, of these deserved the win, but it would have been nice to see Robert Shaw walk away with the award for his fantastic work in Jaws. And Murray Hamilton, as the pedantic, shallow mayor, probably deserved a nom.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Ronee Blakley - Nashville
    Lee Grant - Shampoo - WINNER
    Sylvia Miles - Farewell, My Lovely
    Lily Tomlin - Nashville
    Brenda Vaccaro - Jacqueline Suzanne's Once Is Not Enough

    Seen none of these.

    BEST MUSIC, SCORING ORIGINAL SONG SCORE AND/OR ADAPTATION

    Funny Lady - Peter Matz
    Barry Lyndon - Leonard Rosenman - WINNER
    Tommy - Pete Townshend

    Rocky Horror deserved a nomination and Tommy deserved the win.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    How Lucky Can You Get - Funny Lady
    I'm Easy - Nashville - WINNER
    Now That We're In Love - Whiffs
    Richard's Window - The Other Side of the Mountain
    Theme from Mahogany (Do You Know Where You're Going To) - Mahogany

    Got this one right; I'm Easy is a beautiful, melancholy pitch perfect little song. Nashville was full of them (it was full of horrible ones too); For the Sake of the Children and It Don't Worry Me could have easily gotten nominations too.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SCORE

    Birds Do It, Bees Do It - Gerald Fried
    Bite the Bullet - Alex North
    Jaws - John Williams - WINNER
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - Jack Nitzsche
    The Wind and the Lion - Jerry Goldsmith

    Absolutely gave this one to the proper one.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE:

    Adios Amigo
    Ali: Fear Eats the Soul
    At Long Last Love
    Breakheart Pass
    Capone
    Cooley High
    Crazy Mama
    Cria Cuervos
    Cria!
    Death Race 2000
    Deewaar
    Dersu Uzala
    Faustrecht der Freiheit
    Fox and His Friends
    Grey Gardens
    Hard Times
    Hearts of the West
    Hiding Place
    Hustle
    In This House of Brede
    India Song
    Jeanne Dielman 23 Quai du Commerce
  14. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    YEAR: 1975

    A pretty crummy year, frankly.


    BEST PICTURE

    Barry Lyndon
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Jaws
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - WINNER

    Never liked "Cuckoo's Nest" nor "Nashville" nor "Barry Lyndon". Thus between "Jaws" (which is a little downmarket, when you watch it again) and DDA, which is mostly an actors' showcase. "Monty Python" would be my choice.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Robert Altman - Nashville
    Federico Fellini - Amarcord
    Milos Forman - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - WINNER
    Stanley Kubrick - Barry Lyndon
    Sidney Lumet - Dog Day Afternoon

    Probably Lumet.

    Probably not. Ever. Jones and Gilliam for "The Holy Grail" or Huston for "The Man Who Would Be King.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Walter Matthau - The Sunshine Boys
    Jack Nicholson - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - WINNER
    Al Pacino - Dog Day Afternoon
    Maximilian Schell - The Man in the Glass Booth
    James Whitmore - Give 'em Hell, Harry

    I'd have loved to see Roy Scheider nominated for Jaws; Dreyfuss too. But Nicholson is a force of nature; he really deserved an Oscar in 74 for Chinatown, but one can hardly quibble. Though Pacino is astounding in Dog Day Afternoon. And it would have killed them, I guess to give Tim Curry one for Rocky Horror. Yes, it would have. And a little love for Warren Beatty who gives a shockingly brilliant performance as a shallow, horrid man in Shampoo. Wouldn't have thought he had it in him.

    Either Nicholson or Pacino are fine choices; Scheider would be okay, too. But also: Caine and Connery in "The Man Who Would Be King"

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Isabelle Adjani - L'Histoire d'Adele H.
    Louise Fletcher - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - WINNER
    Glenda Jackson - Hedda
    Carol Kane - Hester Street
    Ann-Margret - Tommy

    Fletcher was good; haven't seen the others.

    Geraldine Chaplin in "Cria cuervos" or maybe Blythe Danner in "Hearts of the West"

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    George Burns - The Sunshine Boys - WINNER
    Brad Dourif - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    Burgess Meredith - The Day of the Locust
    Chris Sarandon - Dog Day Afternoon
    Jack Warden - Shampoo

    I didn't like anything about Dog Day Afternoon, least of all, Meredith's horrifying Vaudevillian performance. Sarandon was good in his brief part in Dog Day Afternoon, but I think Cazale was better. Dourif, of these deserved the win, but it would have been nice to see Robert Shaw walk away with the award for his fantastic work in Jaws. And Murray Hamilton, as the pedantic, shallow mayor, probably deserved a nom.

    Cazale

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Ronee Blakley - Nashville
    Lee Grant - Shampoo - WINNER
    Sylvia Miles - Farewell, My Lovely
    Lily Tomlin - Nashville
    Brenda Vaccaro - Jacqueline Suzanne's Once Is Not Enough

    Ana Torrent in "Cria cuervos"

    BEST MUSIC, SCORING ORIGINAL SONG SCORE AND/OR ADAPTATION

    Funny Lady - Peter Matz
    Barry Lyndon - Leonard Rosenman - WINNER
    Tommy - Pete Townshend

    Rocky Horror deserved a nomination and Tommy deserved the win.

    Tommy

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    How Lucky Can You Get - Funny Lady
    I'm Easy - Nashville - WINNER
    Now That We're In Love - Whiffs
    Richard's Window - The Other Side of the Mountain
    Theme from Mahogany (Do You Know Where You're Going To) - Mahogany

    Got this one right; I'm Easy is a beautiful, melancholy pitch perfect little song. Nashville was full of them (it was full of horrible ones too); For the Sake of the Children and It Don't Worry Me could have easily gotten nominations too.

    "I'm Easy" might have been if performed by an actual singer.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SCORE

    Birds Do It, Bees Do It - Gerald Fried
    Bite the Bullet - Alex North
    Jaws - John Williams - WINNER
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - Jack Nitzsche
    The Wind and the Lion - Jerry Goldsmith

    Absolutely gave this one to the proper one.

    Amen.

  15. Hammurabi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 14, 2007
    star 4
    The real travesty is Holy Grail didn't even get nominated in writing. :oops:
  16. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    Thirty-four years on, that just looks weird.
  17. halibut Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 27, 2000
    star 8
    I love the theme from Mahogany.

    And I also adore Windmills of Your Mind [face_not_talking]
  18. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    YEAR: 1931 (no supporting awards for acting are given; no awards for music are given)

    BEST PICTURE

    Cimmarron - WINNER
    East Lynne
    The Front Page
    Skippy
    Trader Horn

    Actually, a very good year, not that you could tell it from this slate. How about we replace them all with the following: City Lights; Frankenstein; The Public Enemy; M; and . . . I suppose The Front Page can stay. It's a great play anyway. :p M, by the by, should have won.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Lionel Barrymore - A Free Soul - WINNER
    Jackie Cooper - Skippy
    Richard Dix - Cimarron
    Fredric March - The Royal Family of Broadway
    Adolphe Menjou - The Front Page

    Peter Lorre gave the finest performance of his career as the pedophile killer in Lang's M. Also, it seems odd, in hindsight, not to have Cagney or Robinson nominated for The Public Enemy and Little Caesar respectively given that it was those roles that would more or less define their entire careers. Also, since there was no supporting category, it seems a little petty to vent, I suppose, but I seriously think Karloff should have had an Oscar for Frankenstein. And Dwight Frye a nomination for Dracula; the only good thing in that movie.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Marlene Dietrich - Morocco
    Marie Dressler - Min and Bill - WINNER
    Irene Dunne - Cimarron
    Ann Harding - Holiday
    Norma Shearer - A Free Soul

    Haven't seen any of these; of the films from this year that I have seen, no one springs to mind.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Clarence Brown - A Free Soul
    Lewis Milestone - The Front Page
    Wesley Ruggles - Cimarron
    Josef von Sternberg - Morocco
    Norman Taurog - Skippy - WINNER

    Fritz Lang owns all these guys. Though Milestone is generally no slouch; I need to see his version of The Front Page. Will it be better than His Girl Friday? No. Will it still be good? Probably.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE:

    A Bronx Morning
    A Connecticut Yankee
    A Nous la Liberte
    Ambassador Bill
    Arrowsmith
    Bad Girl
    Blonde Crazy
    Born to Love
    Bought
    City Lights
    City Streets
    Dance, Fools, Dance
    Dishonored
    Dracul
    Dracula
    Five and Ten
    Five Star Final
    Frankenstein
    La Chienne
    Le Million
    Little Caesar
    M
    Monkey Business
    Mr. Lemon of Orange
    Night Nurse
    Painted Desert
    Platinum Blonde
    Possessed
    Private Lives
    Sidewalks of New York
    Svengali
    Tabu
    The Black Camel
    The Champ
    The Christmas Party
    The Conquering Horde
    The Criminal Code
    The Forgotten Frontier
    The Last Flight
    The Maltese Falcon
    The Miracle Woman
    The Public Enemy
    The Sign of the Cross
    The Sin of Madelon Claudet
    The Smiling Lieutenant
    The Squaw Man
    The Unholy Garden
    Vampyr
    Waterloo Bridge
    Working Girls
  19. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    YEAR: 1931 (no supporting awards for acting are given; no awards for music are given)

    BEST PICTURE

    Cimmarron - WINNER
    East Lynne
    The Front Page
    Skippy
    Trader Horn

    Actually, a very good year, not that you could tell it from this slate. How about we replace them all with the following: City Lights; Frankenstein; The Public Enemy; M; and . . . I suppose The Front Page can stay. It's a great play anyway. tongue M, by the by, should have won.

    Oh, so true. Here we see the danger of zeitgeist movies. None of the movies above have stood the test of time. I have seen the winner, which is dated and bland. This version of the Front Page is not the one that lasted...which is "His Girl Friday". Four great French movies this year: "Le Chienne", "Le Million", "A Nous La Liberte" and "Vampyr". Two interesting movies with Barbara Stanwyck "Night Nurse" and Capra's "Miracle Woman". A Murnau film: "Tabu" But I'm guessing you're right, the palm goes to "M"

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Lionel Barrymore - A Free Soul - WINNER
    Jackie Cooper - Skippy
    Richard Dix - Cimarron
    Fredric March - The Royal Family of Broadway
    Adolphe Menjou - The Front Page

    Peter Lorre gave the finest performance of his career as the pedophile killer in Lang's M. Also, it seems odd, in hindsight, not to have Cagney or Robinson nominated for The Public Enemy and Little Caesar respectively given that it was those roles that would more or less define their entire careers. Also, since there was no supporting category, it seems a little petty to vent, I suppose, but I seriously think Karloff should have had an Oscar for Frankenstein. And Dwight Frye a nomination for Dracula; the only good thing in that movie.

    The only nomination that should stand is Menjou, probably. Barrymore is ye awful ham. But Peter Lorre should take it--that's the performance of a lifetime. He looks creepy, he acts creepy, he murders innocent little girls, and--we still feel sorry for him! That's talent, folks. Certainly Cagney and Robinson should have been nominated for their star-making roles, but then they worked for Warner Brothers, not MGM, which was more into the awards at this time. Chaplin and Karloff should round it out.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Marlene Dietrich - Morocco
    Marie Dressler - Min and Bill - WINNER
    Irene Dunne - Cimarron
    Ann Harding - Holiday
    Norma Shearer - A Free Soul

    Haven't seen any of these; of the films from this year that I have seen, no one springs to mind.

    Dietrich couldn't act. Dunne is okay, but not great in "Cimmaron". I've liked Harding in other movies, though I haven't seen her in this, and she is forgotten today. Shearer couldn't act, either. Dessler could, but the ultra-sentimental vehicles MGM stuck her in have dated terribly. My choice would be Stanwyck in "Miracle Woman". You know my opinion of Capracorn, Rogue, but early Capra is a whole different story. I saw this movie on TCM, and Stanwyck is mesmerizing--she played a woman evangelist. And Harlow is pretty good--at least she's fearless--in "Platinum Blonde"

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Clarence Brown - A Free Soul
    Lewis Milestone - The Front Page
    Wesley Ruggles - Cimarron
    Josef von Sternberg - Morocco
    Norman Taurog - Skippy - WINNER

    Fritz Lang owns all these guys. Though Milestone is generally no slouch; I need to see his version of The Front Page. Will it be better than His Girl Friday? No. Will it still be good? Probably.

    Brown is a contract director with one brilliant movie, which doesn't happen to be this one (it's "Intruder in the Dust"). "Cimmaron" is a commercial job. Milestone's talents don't lie in farce. Von Sternberg has style, if that's your interest. Taurog was a good comedy director. But if Chaplin, Murnau, Rene Clair, Dreyer, Renoir, Whale and especially Lang with his (I think) best movie are on the slate, the winner would be hard to choose.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE:

    A Nous la Liberte
    City Lights
    Dance, Fools, Dance
    Dracula
    Five Star Final
    Frankenstein
    La Chienne
    Le Million
    Little Caesar
    M
    Monkey Business
    Night Nurse
    Platinum Blonde
    Sidewa
  20. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    YEAR: 1954

    BEST PICTURE

    On the Waterfront - WINNER
    Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
    The Caine Mutiny
    The Country Girl
    Three Coins in the Fountain

    A lot missing here, especially given The Country Girl and Three Coins in the Fountain; Rear Window should definitely be here and Dial M for Murder probably, light though it is. Johnny Guitar should certainly have nom for being the most bizarre, operatic Western film in existence. And obviously The Seven Samurai. And a word for Suddenly, a taut little thriller that is always overlooked.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Humphrey Bogart - The Caine Mutiny
    Marlon Brando - On the Waterfront - WINNER
    Bing Crosby - The Country Girl
    James Mason - A Star is Born
    Dan O'Herlihy - Robinson Crusoe

    Mason is very good in Star is Born, but we're missing Stewart for Rear Window, Miland for his oily and brilliant villainous turn in Dial M for Murder. For all that though, the proper one took it this year. Brando is astounding.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Dorothy Dandridge - Carmen Jones
    Judy Garland - A Star is Born - WINNER
    Audrey Hepburn - Sabrina
    Grace Kelly - The Country Girl
    Jane Wyman - Magnificent Obsession

    Where on earth is Ava Gardner for The Barefoot Contessa; it was a performance boiling with dark sexuality that should have had a nom. Hepburn was great in Sabrina; Wyman and Garland were neither one very good at all. Joan Crawford should have had a nom for Johnny Guitar definitely.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Lee J. Cobb - On the Waterfront
    Karl Malden - On the Waterfront
    Edmond O'Brien - The Barefoot Contessa - WINNER
    Rod Steiger - On the Waterfront
    Tom Tully - The Caine Mutiny

    Cobb and Malden were good, but Steiger should have won this one. Warren Stevens deserved a nomination for his work in The Barefoot Contessa; he was in the movie for maybe half an hour, but as a repressed, puritanical, controlling studio head, he was absolutely terrifying. Sterling Hayden should have gotten a nod for Johnny Guitar and Frank Sinatra deserved a nomination for his work as the hard edged, but ultimately craven killer for hire in Suddenly (a great, great performance).

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Nina Foch - Executive Suite
    Katy Jurado - Broken Lance
    Eva Marie Saint - On the Waterfront - WINNER
    Jan Sterling - The High and the Mighty
    Claire Trevor - The High and the Mighty

    Good as Saint was, Mercedes McCambridge should have been nominated and won for her terrifying villainous turn in Johnny Guitar. You remember it. And Thelma Ritter should have been nominated for Rear Window.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Alfred Hitchcock - Rear Window
    Elia Kazan - On the Waterfront - WINNER
    George Seaton - The Country Girl
    William A. Wellman - The High and the Mighty
    Billy Wilder - Sabrina

    A good slate, but where's Ray for Johnny Guitar and Kurosawa for Seven Samurai. Hitchcock should have won.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    Hold My Hand - Susan Slept Here
    Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep - White Christmas
    The High and the Mighty - The High and the Mighty
    The Man That Got Away - A Star is Born
    Three Coins in the Fountain - Three Coins in the Fountain - WINNER

    The Man that Got Away which Garland gives a great read.

    BEST MUSIC, SCORING OF A MUSICAL PICTURE

    A Star Is Born - Ray Heindorf
    Carmen Jones - Herschel Burke Gilbert
    Seven Brides for Seven Brothers - Adolph Deutsch/Saul Chaplin - WINNER
    The Glenn Miller Story - Joseph Gershenson/Henry Mancini
    There's No Business Like Show Business - Alfred Newman/Lionel Newman

    Couldn't say.

    BEST MUSIC, SCORING OF DRAMATIC OR COMEDY PICTURE

    Genevieve - Larry Adler
    On the Waterfront - Leonard Bernstein
    The Caine Mutiny - Max Steiner
    The High and the Mighty - Dimitri Tiomkin - WINNER
    The Silver Chalice - Franz Waxman

    Couldn't say, really.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE

    20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
    Animal Farm
    Apache
    Bad Day at Black Rock
    Beau Brummel
    Brigadoon
    Cattle Queen of Montana
  21. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    YEAR: 1954

    BEST PICTURE

    On the Waterfront - WINNER
    Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
    The Caine Mutiny
    The Country Girl
    Three Coins in the Fountain

    A lot missing here, especially given The Country Girl and Three Coins in the Fountain; Rear Window should definitely be here and Dial M for Murder probably, light though it is. Johnny Guitar should certainly have nom for being the most bizarre, operatic Western film in existence. And obviously The Seven Samurai. And a word for Suddenly, a taut little thriller that is always overlooked.

    Still haven't seen "Johnny Guitar"; nor "Suddenly". However, "Rear Window", "Les Diaboliques", "La Strada", "Senso", "Ordet", "Hobson's Choice", "Black Day at Black Rock", "Dial M for Murder" and "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" are all good movies.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Humphrey Bogart - The Caine Mutiny
    Marlon Brando - On the Waterfront - WINNER
    Bing Crosby - The Country Girl
    James Mason - A Star is Born
    Dan O'Herlihy - Robinson Crusoe

    Mason is very good in Star is Born, but we're missing Stewart for Rear Window, Milland for his oily and brilliant villainous turn in Dial M for Murder. For all that though, the proper one took it this year. Brando is astounding.

    Brando is the right choice.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Dorothy Dandridge - Carmen Jones
    Judy Garland - A Star is Born - WINNER
    Audrey Hepburn - Sabrina
    Grace Kelly - The Country Girl
    Jane Wyman - Magnificent Obsession

    Where on earth is Ava Gardner for The Barefoot Contessa; it was a performance boiling with dark sexuality that should have had a nom. Hepburn was great in Sabrina; Wyman and Garland were neither one very good at all. Joan Crawford should have had a nom for Johnny Guitar definitely.

    They have it wrong; Kelly, not Garland, won. Neither of them deserved it, though Kelly might have won for "Rear Window" or even "Dial M for Murder". Hepburn is very good, but I haven't seen Dandridge. Brenda de Banzie gives a terrific comedy performance in "Hobson's Choice", and I would vote for her.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Lee J. Cobb - On the Waterfront
    Karl Malden - On the Waterfront
    Edmond O'Brien - The Barefoot Contessa - WINNER
    Rod Steiger - On the Waterfront
    Tom Tully - The Caine Mutiny

    Cobb and Malden were good, but Steiger should have won this one. Warren Stevens deserved a nomination for his work in The Barefoot Contessa; he was in the movie for maybe half an hour, but as a repressed, puritanical, controlling studio head, he was absolutely terrifying. Sterling Hayden should have gotten a nod for Johnny Guitar and Frank Sinatra deserved a nomination for his work as the hard edged, but ultimately craven killer for hire in Suddenly (a great, great performance).

    Stieger. Other possibles: Fred McMurray and Van Johnson are both good in "The Caine Mutiny, and Robert Ryan is excellent in "Bad Day at Black Rock"

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Nina Foch - Executive Suite
    Katy Jurado - Broken Lance
    Eva Marie Saint - On the Waterfront - WINNER
    Jan Sterling - The High and the Mighty
    Claire Trevor - The High and the Mighty

    Good as Saint was, Mercedes McCambridge should have been nominated and won for her terrifying villainous turn in Johnny Guitar. You remember it. And Thelma Ritter should have been nominated for Rear Window.

    Ritter, or Kay Kendall in "Genvieve"

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Alfred Hitchcock - Rear Window
    Elia Kazan - On the Waterfront - WINNER
    George Seaton - The Country Girl
    William A. Wellman - The High and the Mighty
    Billy Wilder - Sabrina

    A good slate, but where's Ray for Johnny Guitar and Kurosawa for Seven Samurai. Hitchcock should have won.

    Hitchcock.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    Hold My Hand - Susan Slept Here
    Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep - White Christmas
    The High and the Mighty - The High and the Mighty
    The Man That Got Away - A Star is Born
    Three Coins in the Fountain - Three Coins in the Fountain - WINNER

    The Man that Got Away which Garland gives a great read.

    God, I hate "The Man that Got Away", and Garland's read is all about her, n
  22. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    YEAR: 1970

    BEST PICTURE

    Airport
    Five Easy Pieces
    Love Story
    Patton ? WINNER
    MASH

    Well, for once, maybe the correct film one. Five Easy Pieces is also quite brilliant, if more of a zeitgeist film. Patton is astoundingly great and timeless, it seems to me. MASH hasn?t held up at all; Love Story and Airport both seem pretty slight for Best Picture to me. Looking at the list below, this seems a very slim year all around though. A Boy Named Charlie Brown is something great, however; some of the animated sequences are every bit as avant garde as Fantasia was thirty years before. I?d love to have seen it nominated.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Melvyn Douglas ? I Never Sang For My Father
    James Earl Jones ? The Great White Hope
    Jack Nicholson ? Five Easy Pieces
    Ryan O?Neal ? Love Story
    George C. Scott ? Patton ? WINNER

    I think, again, the proper one took this prize. Any other year Nicholson would have won, and deservedly, for his incredible turn in Five Easy Pieces (his stare down in the truckstop bathroom is one of the greatest acting moments I?ve ever seen). But Scott was fire and brimstone times three as Patton.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Jane Alexander ? The Great White Hope
    Glenda Jackson ? Women in Love ? WINNER
    Ali MacGraw ? Love Story
    Sarah Miles ? Ryan?s Daughter
    Carrie Snodgrass ? Diary of a Mad Housewife

    I don?t know about any of these really.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Richard S. Castellano ? Lovers and Other Strangers
    Chief Dan George ? Little Big Man
    Gene Hackman ? I Never Sang for My Father
    John Marley ? Love Story
    John Mills ? Ryan?s Daughter ? WINNER

    Would have been nice to see Orson Welles get a nod for Start the Revolution Without Me. Also Karl Malden for the absolutely thankless role of Omar Bradley in Patton.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Karen Black ? Five Easy Pieces
    Lee Grant ? The Landlord
    Helen Hayes ? Airport ? WINNER
    Sally Kellerman ? MASH
    Maureen Stapleton ? Airport

    Kellerman was all kinds of great in MASH; she was a bit too good really. Her nervous breakdown after the shower incident was too painful for me to laugh at. I?m certainly no fan of Black, but she was okay in Five Easy Pieces.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Robert Altman ? MASH
    Federico Fellini ? Fellini ? Satyricon
    Arthur Hiller ? Love Story
    Ken Russell ? Women in Love
    Franklin J. Schaffner ? Patton ? WINNER

    Fine choice.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    For All We Know ? Lovers and Other Strangers ? WINNER
    Pieces of Dreams ? Pieces of Dreams
    Till Love Touches Your Life ? Madron
    Thank You Very Much ? Scrooge
    Whistling Away the Dark ? Darling Lili

    I actually kind of like Thank You Very Much, in a totally perverse way. I wonder what?s up with Let It Be missing entirely; were the songs ineligible for some reason?

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SCORE

    Airport ? Alfred Newman
    Cromwell ? Frank Cordell
    I Girasoli ? Henry Mancini
    Love Story ? Francis Lai ? WINNER
    Patton ? Jerry Goldsmith

    Patton cleaned up the awards, but it didn?t win this one. Should have. One of Goldsmith?s most ethereal scores, which seems odd, but isn?t. Those far away trumpets I still remember.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG SCORE

    The Baby Maker ? Fred Karlin, Tylwyth Kymry
    A Boy Named Charlie Brown ? Rod McKuen, John Scott Trotter, Bill Melendez, Alan Shean, Vince Guaraldi
    Darling Lili ? Henry Mancini, Johnny Mercer
    Let It Be ? Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison, Ringo Starr ? WINNER
    Scrooge ? Leslie Bricusse, Ian Fraser, Herbert W. Spencer

    Much as I love, love, love A Boy Named Charlie Brown, the right one took this one. A shame Performance wasn?t eligible (I?m thinking most of the songs on that soundtrack were preexisting.) That?s probably also why Woodstock wasn?t nominated.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE

    10 Rillington Place
    A Man Called Horse
    Alex in Wonderland
    Beneath the Planet of the Apes
    Beyond the Valley of the Dolls
    Bloody Mama
    Brewster McCloud
    Brian's Song
    Burn!
    Catch-22
    Cotton Com
  23. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    This is an extremely bleak year.

    YEAR: 1970

    BEST PICTURE

    Airport
    Five Easy Pieces
    Love Story
    Patton ? WINNER
    MASH

    "Airport" & "Love Story" are schlock; "Five Easy Pieces" is a misguided art film; "Patton" is directed by a hack (basically) but has brilliant things in it; and "MASH" is a zeitgeist, self-flattering mess.

    "Patton" of those nominated; "The Conformist" of those not.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Melvyn Douglas ? I Never Sang For My Father
    James Earl Jones ? The Great White Hope
    Jack Nicholson ? Five Easy Pieces
    Ryan O?Neal ? Love Story
    George C. Scott ? Patton ? WINNER

    Yes, he should have, and did, win. Gene Wilder probably didn't have a chance in "Start the Revolution Without Me", but he was great, too.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Jane Alexander ? The Great White Hope
    Glenda Jackson ? Women in Love ? WINNER
    Ali MacGraw ? Love Story
    Sarah Miles ? Ryan?s Daughter
    Carrie Snodgrass ? Diary of a Mad Housewife

    I wouldn't vote for anyone here.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Richard S. Castellano ? Lovers and Other Strangers
    Chief Dan George ? Little Big Man
    Gene Hackman ? I Never Sang for My Father
    John Marley ? Love Story
    John Mills ? Ryan?s Daughter ? WINNER

    Haven't seen Hackman and Castellano; George isn't very good, though he is charming; Marley and Mills overact. Hugh Griffith in "Start the Revolution Without Me" ("I thought it was a costume ball!")


    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Karen Black ? Five Easy Pieces
    Lee Grant ? The Landlord
    Helen Hayes ? Airport ? WINNER
    Sally Kellerman ? MASH
    Maureen Stapleton ? Airport

    Not taken with any of these. Dominique Sanda in "The Conformist".

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Robert Altman ? MASH
    Federico Fellini ? Fellini ? Satyricon
    Arthur Hiller ? Love Story
    Ken Russell ? Women in Love
    Franklin J. Schaffner ? Patton ? WINNER

    Late Fellini is generally crap; Hiller's a low-brow hack; Altman's a highbrow hack; Russell's an overcooked moron; and Franklin J.'s a middlebrow hack.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    For All We Know ? Lovers and Other Strangers ? WINNER
    Pieces of Dreams ? Pieces of Dreams
    Till Love Touches Your Life ? Madron
    Thank You Very Much ? Scrooge
    Whistling Away the Dark ? Darling Lili

    Only one I've heard is the winner. Not bad.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SCORE

    Airport ? Alfred Newman
    Cromwell ? Frank Cordell
    I Girasoli ? Henry Mancini
    Love Story ? Francis Lai ? WINNER
    Patton ? Jerry Goldsmith

    Can't say.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG SCORE

    The Baby Maker ? Fred Karlin, Tylwyth Kymry
    A Boy Named Charlie Brown ? Rod McKuen, John Scott Trotter, Bill Melendez, Alan Shean, Vince Guaraldi
    Darling Lili ? Henry Mancini, Johnny Mercer
    Let It Be ? Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison, Ringo Starr ? WINNER
    Scrooge ? Leslie Bricusse, Ian Fraser, Herbert W. Spencer

    I suppose the right film won, though the Beatles were past their 'best by' date by this time.


  24. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    Ceremony Year: 1996

    BEST PICTURE

    Apollo 13
    Babe
    Braveheart ? WINNER
    Il Postino
    Sense and Sensibility

    Okay, there?s a lot to do here. Let?s be merciless; first, let?s kick out Apollo 13, solid, but not great, and plug in David Fincher?s Se7en, as great a film as was released that year. Babe has to stay; it?s also worthy. Braveheart ? out, despite its brilliance, to be replaced by Michael Mann?s epic Heat. Il Postino ? out to make way for Ian McKellen?s astonishing update of Richard III. Sense and Sensibility can stay. If I had a sixth slot . . . I?d throw in While You Were Sleeping, as great a romcom as we?ve had since the glory days of Cary Grant.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Nicolas Cage ? Leaving Las Vegas ? WINNER
    Richard Dreyfuss ? Mr. Holland?s Opus
    Anthony Hopkins ? Nixon
    Sean Penn ? Dead Man Walking
    Massimo Troisi ? Il Postino

    Haven?t seen many of these. Hopkins was brilliant in Nixon, I will say. However, I have to once again note the absence of Se7en, for which both Pitt and Freeman rated a nom, and Heat, for which, at the very least, Pacino deserved a nom. Also, if Ian McKellan?s turn as Richard III doesn?t get nominated, nothing should. Plus, James Cromwell ain?t no supporting player in Babe; he needs a lead nomination and even with all that competition, he might just win it. In the fantasy category, was Leslie Nielsen or was Leslie Nielsen not just brilliant in Dracula: Dead and Loving It, Mel Brooks? last great film? My slate would be Freeman, Pitt, Pacino, Hopkins, Cromwell, with Cromwell or Pacino to win it.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Susan Sarandon ? Dead Man Walking ? WINNER
    Elisabeth Shue ? Leaving Las Vegas
    Sharon Stone ? Casino
    Meryl Streep ? The Bridges of Madison County
    Emma Thompson ? Sense and Sensibility

    I have no problem with Thompson for Sense and Sensibility, so she stays. Stone was solid in Casino, if not exactly revelatory, but Streep was not great in Bridges. I?d slip in Sandra Bullock for While You Were Sleeping (and I?m not even that big of a fan) for giving the definitive screwball performance of the nineties. Also, Alicia Silverstone for Clueless for another great comedic performance. In the realm of thrillers, Holly Hunter?s lead turn in Copycat is a distinct possibility; others will probably prefer Sigourney Weaver from the same movie, but I say Hunter gave the performance.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    James Cromwell ? Babe
    Ed Harris ? Apollo 13
    Brad Pitt ? Twelve Monkeys
    Tim Roth ? Rob Roy
    Kevin Spacey ? The Usual Suspects ? WINNER

    Pitt?s performance in Twelve Monkeys was a great one and can stay. Spacey should have been nominated for his turn in Se7en, which was the better performance. From The Usual Suspects, the supporting performance that deserved a nom was Benicio Del Toro?s. I would also mention as possibilities Val Kilmer for Heat, a remarkably restrained and interior performance from a generally scenery chewing actor. Also, Chris Tucker became his own kind of icon with his supporting turn in Friday and he probably deserved a nomination. Also, Peter Boyle was brilliant in While You Were Sleeping, but then so was Peter Gallagher. And if I can be completely off the beam here, two other far out possibilities for nominations are Paul Rudd for Clueless and Christopher Lambert for his winking, cackling, absurdist performance in Mortal Kombat. Of these, probably Spacey deserves the win, though, as I say, for Se7en as opposed to The Usual Suspects.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Joan Allen ? Nixon
    Kathleen Quinlan ? Apollo 13
    Mira Sorvino ? Mighty Aphrodite ? WINNER
    Mare Winningham ? Georgia
    Kate Winslet ? Sense and Sensibility

    Winslet was very good in Sense and Sensibility. Brittany Murphy probably deserved a nom for Clueless. Quinlan and Allen were both pretty good without being great; I seem to recall Zaz saying in our old Oscar snub thread, ?Joan Allen had Pat Nixon?s curiously null quality down pat,? which I remember so vividly because it
  25. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    Your list of notable films from that year scares me, Rogue. You've got a '96 film and a '97 film in there, on a cursory glance. :p

    Oh, and this is one of my most loathed Academy lineups...

    Ceremony Year: 1996

    BEST PICTURE

    Apollo 13 is good, not great, Babe is the same, Braveheart is as dumb as a brick and basically operates like any 90s action film... and that's not in a good way, Il Postino is slightly sorta kinda charming, but not really all that good, and Sense and Sensibility is actually pretty damn good. I'd give it the win in that lineup. However... where in God's name is Heat, Se7en, Nixon, Toy Story and Dead Man Walking? A far superior lineup, that would be, if you ask me. I think this is one of the few years where I'd trade out ALL of AMPAS's nominees.

    My top film of that year is Se7en, so... that for the win.

    I'm not big on Loncraine's Richard III, truth be told. It's too wrapped up in its own gimmick, and while McKellen is entertaining, he's just nowhere near fun enough. I want Richard to compel me to go along for the ride, and not have the urge for someone to kill the bugger.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Haven't seen Cage (to my continual annoyance... I find the prospect of Nicolas Cage being an Oscar winner to be utterly perplexing), or Dreyfuss. Hopkins... well, this is probably Hopkins' best performance. Or second-best, after The Remains of the Day. Either way, it's a astonishing, and it's my win from this lineup. Penn is also very, very good. Troisi... well, this seems like a bit of a sympathy nomination. He's good, but Il Postino in general wouldn't have received much of a look in if the Weinsteins hadn't gotten their hooks into it. Its merits are... limited.

    I don't like either Pacino or De Niro's work in Heat - it's my main grievance with the film. Pacino is waaay too over the top, and De Niro is way too... under the top. There's no middle ground with either of them, and it's nowhere near their best work. I'd say that Freeman and Pitt most certainly deserved nominations, though... not sure about whether Cromwell would really be able to compete in the lead race (the pig is the lead, anyway :p) and I've aired my thoughts on McKellen above. Good performance, but not enough to make him the second dude nominated for playing the role.

    Either way, Hopkins for the win.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Haven't seen Shue. Pretty strong lineup, although I'm not entirely sold on Stone. Streep's work in The Bridges of Madison County is one of the few performances of hers that I can genuinely admire and appreciate, Thompson is superb as always, and Sarandon is in top form. I have no real grievances here. I suppose Julia Ormond was sorta charming in Sabrina, although not on an Audrey Hepburn level.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    All terrific performances, to be honest. A very strone lineup, although yeah, I prefer Spacey in Se7en. But there are a bevy of performances in Nixon that could have nabbed a spot. Paul Sorvino and James Woods, perhaps. My win from the lot would probably be... Ed Harris, though. Probably because it's more genuinely "supporting" and not "scene stealing." Maybe Hackman in Get Shorty would be good, since he's the only thing that makes that film remotely tolerable.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Haven't seen Sorvino or Winningham. Allen is terrific, the other two... are OK. No love for Paltrow in Se7en? I think she does quite a bit with a role that is perhaps thankless. I can't really think of any other suggestions, though... there's probably someone else in Sense and Sensibility, some older British stalwart, that was probably kicking it old school that I've forgotten.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Fincher's my win too, but without having seen Figgis... I think this is a pretty poor field, much like Best Picture. I might be tempted to keep in Chris Noonan. Mel Gibson