Amph Hindsight is 20-20: Oscar Ceremonies of the Past (Disc. 1977)

Discussion in 'Community' started by Rogue1-and-a-half, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    Well, you'd be right about that.

    CEREMONY YEAR: 2003

    BEST PICTURE

    Chicago ? WINNER
    Gangs of New York
    The Hours
    The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
    The Pianist

    Let?s first look at the slate here and then I?ll throw up my own perfect slate of ten. First of all, I think we all know that Chicago only won because Moulin Rouge hadn?t. Chicago is a great soundtrack, but not much a movie. The Two Towers should be here, no question. The Hours is a movie about ideas, hamstrung by a script that occasionally clunks like hell (mostly in the Julianne Moore sections) and by some pretty bad performances (Julianne Moore, most notably). It?s about a third a great movie, a third a very good one and a third a misfire. That doesn?t get it a Best Picture nom in my book.

    My slate of ten nominees:

    About a Boy ? Hugh Grant finally delivers the performance we?ve always known he had somewhere, a deep excavation of the soullessness at the heart of his usual callow turns; Nick Hornby?s original novel gets reworked, but the spirit of Hornby is still here and the film, which, given the bare outlines of its plot, could be a Hallmark channel special, is instead caustic, brilliant and hilarious.

    Habla Con Ella (Talk to Her) ? Almodovar?s mind blowingly great story about two men who bond over their similar situations; they are each in love with a woman in a coma. Things get strange from there and beautiful and heartbreaking, but the film is a masterpiece, full stop.

    Insomnia ? Nolan?s follow-up to the astounding Memento gets dropped out of his filmography a lot for some reason; it?s not as great as Memento or as good as The Prestige or The Dark Knight. But it?s a solid, utterly Hitchcockian thriller that even Robin Williams can?t spoil.

    One Hour Photo ? Robin Williams? performance here is unbelievably good and the film is artsy and heady in exactly the same degree that it is tense and suspenseful. I wish more thrillers like this got made; smart, taut, stylish, minimal, with immersive acting. Fantastic.

    Panic Room ? forgotten gem from Fincher, but probably the best thriller of its year and one of the best of the entire decade. Defines claustrophobic and it is pure Hitchcock all the way to Shore?s Hermann-esque score and those North by Northwest-ian titles.

    Rabbit Proof Fence ? Incredible true story of three Australian aboriginal girls who escape the government school where they?ve been held prisoner; following another epic failure, the government?s rabbit proof fence, across the continent, they head back home. This is one of the best movies I?ve ever seen and the three young girls at its heart do some of the best juvenile acting I?ve ever seen.

    Signs ? Shyamalan?s swan song as an artist, but maybe, in the final analysis, the best of his astounding trio of supernatural thrillers. The Sixth Sense was about grief; Unbreakable was about guilt; this movie is unapologetically about faith. The final shot of the movie is easily the best in M. Night?s body of work.

    The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers ? perhaps the easiest of the trilogy to dump on, but then I always tend to think the one I?m watching at the moment is actually the best of the trilogy. A middle chapter that isn?t Empire, but neither does it fall short of the others in any significant way.

    The Quiet American ? Michael Caine anchors this surprisingly taut and elegiac Graham Greene adaptation. The story is ever new; America is forever in some quagmire or other. But it?s the emotional heft of Caine?s beautiful characterization that sells the film, a dirty, tired, corrupt old man with only one thing left to care about.

    The Rookie ? I wouldn?t have expected to care about a baseball movie again, especially one that was actually about fathers and sons. Field of Dreams had done that to perfection, I thought. But will wonders never cease? A G rated Disney movie about baseball that is actually among the finest films of its year and, for all intents and purposes, an entirely perfect film. Beautiful.

    A few others that di
  2. Mastadge Manager Emeritus

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    I must admit I don't remember this well, but I do remember that this made me uncomfortable. Berry's moment of shock, however quick her recovery, made the whole incident smack to me of sexual assault, which I don't find hilarious. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong and it was planned.
  3. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

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    I don't know. I just watched it again and I don't really think I see anything like that there. I don't necessarily think it was was planned for weeks or anything that whoever won would kiss the presenter (Nicholson was nominated!), but I think Brody probably signalled Berry on his approach. When she pulls away, she appears, to me at least, to be playing the moment up like a pro. I don't really see a moment that appears to reveal that she's really humiliated or angry on the inside. It looks to me like a great bit of improv; I'm certainly sympathetic to what you're saying, but I doubt she'd say it was sexual assault. I could be wrong, of course, and if it did cross the line, then, yeah, you're right, it's not funny. I can't see anything on tape to indicate that she felt that it did; then again, she is an actress. :p Though, if Halle Berry felt that he'd assaulted her, I kind of think he wouldn't have been getting as much work as he did after that. :p Regardless, to defend my characterization of it, all I can say is that I don't see anything to indicate it was an assault from watching the tape so I find it humorous; only Berry really knows for sure if it was a great funny moment or and assault and if she knows that it was an assault, then, I'll be the first to say that Brody overstepped his bounds.
  4. Todd the Jedi Mod and Inquisitor of SWTV

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    I think Catch Me if You Can and Munich were Spielberg's only really good films of the last decade. Minority Report was okay and Indy was, well, Indy, but his others just didn't do anything for me. Actually his TV work was better IMO. The only bad thing about CMIYC was Tom Hanks' awful Boston accent, if that was indeed what he was going for. But he was great otherwise. Leo was great, even Christopher Walken of all people was great. Martin Sheen too.

    I also lol'd at Brody and Berry's kiss at the time.[face_laugh] I saw Chicago and thought it was alright, but thought the Pianist deserved best picture.
  5. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    I don't know if there's an Oscar slate I dislike more than 2002's. Gangs of New York is the only BP nominee that I think attains any degree of excellence, however fleeting it may be. Chicago is servicable, but hardly great, especially when you think of what Bob Fosse might have done with it. I loathe The Hours and The Two Towers utterly, and The Pianist did nothing for me.

    Bad vintage overall though. My BP lineup would be something like...

    One Hour Photo
    Road to Perdition
    About Schmidt
    Gangs of New York

    And... uh... uh...

    The Sum of All Fears

    That's all I've got. Those films would then dominate all the other categories. I haven't seen Talk to Her yet, so we'll see about that.
  6. solojones Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 27, 2000
    star 9
    Road to Perdition and About a Boy each rank in my top 20 films of all time. I probably would have given the statue to Road to Perdition by a nose, perhaps because I feel it's more likely a heavier drama would win anyway. These are both, in a sense, stories about fathers and sons. Spielberg would be proud :p

    Speaking of Spielberg, Catch Me If You Can is delightful. Not only is it charming and enthralling in its "you can't write fiction as crazy as the truth" way, but it contains the single best knock knock joke of all time, care of Tom Hanks.

    Chicago I actually enjoy a lot. No, it didn't deserve to win and yes, it took Moulin Rouge's awards (and MR is an astounding work of brilliance). But I don't think Chicago's a bad film. I appreciated the way the songs were worked in as fantasy sequences that didn't feel too much like the stage play. Good movie, just not the best picture.

    I couldn't care less about most of the other films on this slate. A couple I haven't seen. The Pianist I saw and felt like I *should* like a lot because it's Polanski and it's WWII, but have forgotten pretty easily.

    The last thing I will say is that I completely agree with you, Rogue, about Signs. One of the most underrated films in years. People who think this film is about aliens are.... :oops: I have no words.

    -sj loves kevin spacey
  7. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    CEREMONY YEAR: 2004

    Ah, yes, the year of The Lord of the Rings? epic sweep. It?s a fond memory for me because I remember watching the ceremony and getting more and more excited about my own sweep: this is the closest I?ve ever come to nailing every category; I missed one frigging category on my predictions list. In other words, most predictable ceremony ever. Oh, well.

    BEST PICTURE

    The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King ? WINNER
    Lost in Translation
    Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World
    Mystic River
    Seabiscuit

    Return of the King, Lost In Translation and Mystic River all unapologetically belong. Seabiscuit was a surprisingly good movie, but I think it?s a little out of place here. Never got around to Master and Commander.

    A handful of snubs in descending order of their egregiousness:

    Finding Nemo ? still maybe Pixar?s best movie (tied in my head with The Incredibles), this gorgeously animated, hilariously funny movie was more than a visual feast and a knee slapping extravanganza. Thanks to the great script and Albert Brooks? great voice work, it was a surprisingly moving drama about loss and parenthood.

    Peter Pan ? this is, for my money, far and away the definitive film version of this tale and maybe the only legitimately great one. A luminous adventure film for children the way they should all be done.

    Freaky Friday ? this Disney remake was surprisingly hilarious and managed to outdo the original in every way possible. Energetic, vivacious and consistently packed with laugh out loud moments, this is probably the best comedy you ever skipped because it was from Disney

    X2 ? this hotly anticipated sequel wasn?t as good as The Dark Knight; it doesn?t exactly transcend its genre to become, as TDK was, a classic for all time. But it?s easily at least ten times better than its surprisingly dull predecessor and the ensemble actually works for once. Even Jackman?s generally clichéd performance from the first one finds depths; ?She chose you,? and I choose this one.

    The School of Rock ? was this a good year for comedy or what? This is easily Jack Black?s best movie and, aside from its often raucous and sidesplitting comedy, it has a sweet streak that never gets maudlin and a reminder that great music never dies.

    Love Actually ? the great bits of this scattershot movie are so good as to make you wish that the editor had taken his job a bit more seriously and entirely trimmed the not so great bits. When the movie hits, it?s tremendous; when it doesn?t . . . well, it sucks, to be honest. But it pulls it all together for a surprisingly moving ending; maybe the Beach Boys have never been so perfectly used in a movie.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Johnny Depp ? Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl
    Ben Kingsley ? House of Sand and Fog
    Jude Law ? Cold Mountain
    Bill Murray ? Lost In Translation
    Sean Penn ? Mystic River ? WINNER

    Penn was surprisingly great in Mystic River. Murray was revelatory in Lost In Translation. Can we give the award to both of them?

    Also, Depp?s role in Pirates of the Caribbean was a supporting one, not a lead. Plus, what a stupid role for such a great actor to get nominated for. Where were the Oscars back around, oh, Edward Scissorhands, Ed Wood, etc? Taking a nap, as usual. If I was Depp, I would have told them to stuff this nomination in their ear.

    A couple of other possibilities: Ewan MacGregor for his honeyed Southern charm in the mostly uninteresting Big Fish and, stretching a lot, Jack Black for his best performance to date in The School of Rock.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Keisha Castle-Hughes ? Whale Rider
    Diane Keaton ? Something?s Gotta Give
    Samantha Morton ? In America
    Charlize Theron ? Monster ? WINNER
    Naomi Watts ? 21 Grams

    Jamie Lee Curtis deserved a nomination for Freaky Friday, in which she was comic perfection.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Alec Baldwin ? The Cooler
    Benicio Del Toro ? 21 Grams
    Djimon Hounsou ? In America
    Tim
  8. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

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    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    Urgh. Another horrible year, although at least the director's branch had the good sense to recognize Meirelles for City of God, which is a true "Achievment in Directing."

    I actually love the Depp nomination - he's hilarious in that film, and I don't think it's category fraud at all - he's co-lead with Bloom. Rarely does a tentpole film get recognized in the top acting categories. Actually, I think he probably should have won - there are few performances as iconic in the last 10 years. If the film didn't run about 40 minutes overtime, I could probably justify it getting into a few more categories.

    Mystic River is terrific, and kick-started Eastwood's own little renaissance. Easily the best of the nominated films, and it should have won.

    I also liked The Last Samurai, and is probably the only Ed Zwick film (apart from Glory) that deserved to be anywhere near the Oscars. I'd give BSA to Watanabe from that lineup - a tremendous performance.

    Shattered Glass is probably the best film of that year, though. Really magnificent, beautiful writing, great acting across the board. I'm not sure whether I could justify ever nominating Hayden Christensen for an Oscar, but he is utterly perfect in that role. He should always play duplicitous, lying scumbags. Actually, I'd nominate him in supporting, and Peter Sarsgaard in lead, and give him the win. I'd have that film sweep most of the top awards actually - stick Chloe Sevigny in Supporting Actress, and give another Supporting Actor nomination to Hank Azaria.

    I think on reflection that I'd give the top prize and Best Director to City of God, though.
  9. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    I remember this as perhaps the dullest Oscar show I've ever seen, and that's saying something.
  10. KnightWriter Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 6, 2001
    star 8
    Horrible year? What? It has Lost in Translation. That alone makes it a great year. Speaking of which, LiT should have won Best Picture. I actively disliked RotK, and Finding Nemo is also the only Pixar film I don't really care for. I didn't when I saw it, at least, and I've never wanted to watch it a second time.
  11. Mastadge Manager Emeritus

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    Jun 4, 1999
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    Howard, not Horner. But yes, I share your love for Peter Pan.
  12. Todd the Jedi Mod and Inquisitor of SWTV

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    I think half the actors should have been nominated, especially Elijah Wood, Andy Serkis and Ian Mckellen, if only for their cumulative efforts. But yeah, this was a predictable award year, but it was the start of the trend of Best Animated Picture going to Pixar.
  13. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    CEREMONY YEAR: 2007

    I was rather astonished at how few movies I seem to have seen from this year. Purely by chance, this year was a weak one for me.

    BEST PICTURE

    Babel
    The Departed ? WINNER
    Letters From Iwo Jima
    Little Miss Sunshine
    The Queen

    The Queen and The Departed are the only two I?ve seen from this slate; they?re both brilliant. I think The Queen was probably better; I know it was tighter. But then The Departed was great when it was great, if you know what I mean.

    I would have liked to see V for Vendetta, a weird, completely strange comic book film, nominated. And certainly Nolan?s intricate puzzle box The Prestige deserved a nomination too, if not the win.


    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Leonardo DiCaprio ? Blood Diamond
    Ryan Gosling ? Half Nelson
    Peter O?Toole ? Venus
    Will Smith ? The Pursuit of Happyness
    Forest Whitaker ? The Last King of Scotland ? WINNER

    DiCaprio?s accent notwithstanding, I thought his performance in The Departed was far better than his turn in Blood Diamond and the best thing about The Departed. Also, I missed Venus, but, God, wasn?t it great to see O?Toole at the ceremony?

    Hugh Jackman deserved a nomination for his unbelievably great turn in The Prestige; he?s generally pretty flat, but he found real pain and unhappiness in The Prestige. Wasn?t even an actor?s movie.


    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Penelope Cruz ? Volver
    Judi Dench ? Notes On a Scandal
    Helen Mirren ? The Queen ? WINNER
    Meryl Streep ? The Devil Wears Prada
    Kate Winslet ? Little Children

    No arguments with the winner here, though I wish Mirren would take a couple of big steps back now. I thought Streep?s performance in Devil Wears Prada wasn?t really that great. She steadfastly refused to have fun with it, which was a shame.

    Nat Portman deserved a nom for her fearless, career best turn as Evie in V for Vendetta.


    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Alan Arkin ? Little Miss Sunshine ? WINNER
    Jackie Earle Haley ? Little Children
    Djimon Hounsou ? Blood Diamond
    Eddie Murphy ? Dreamgirls
    Mark Wahlberg ? The Departed

    I continue to think Wahlberg was overrated in The Departed, proving only that he could curse at high volume. A lot of critics seemed to think Nicholson spoiled the movie; I disagree: it?s his best performance in a good decade probably and should have been nominated. Even Damon was better than Wahlberg and might have copped a nom too, if I?d had my way.

    I also can?t figure how Stanley Tucci didn?t get nominated for The Devil Wears Prada; he was both the biting wit and the emotional heart of the film, which couldn?t have been easy to pull off.

    Likewise, Michael Sheen deserved a nomination at least and probably the win for his uncanny turn as Tony Blair in The Queen.

    Stephen Rea was the conscience and the soul of V for Vendetta as a weary, cynical police detective on V?s trail. He should have been nominated and possibly should have won.

    And just for fun, David Bowie as future wizard Tesla in The Prestige. That wasn?t acting, but what that was was presence; screw acting.


    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Adriana Barraza ? Babel
    Cate Blanchett ? Notes On a Scandal
    Abigail Breslin ? Little Miss Sunshine
    Jennifer Hudson ? Dreamgirls ? WINNER
    Rinko Kikuchi ? Babel

    No comment.

    BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN DIRECTING

    Clint Eastwood ? Letters From Iwo Jima
    Stephen Frears ? The Queen
    Paul Greengrass ? United 93
    Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu ? Babel
    Martin Scorsese ? The Departed ? WINNER

    Yes, it was great to see Scorsese finally win and he did direct The Departed with a master?s touch and a deadpan to die for. But if the Oscars did things right, he would have already had two Oscars, for Taxi Driver and Raging Bull (at least), and so I can?t let this stand, not in a year when Christopher Nolan gave us The Prestige, a gleeful Mobius strip of a movie that was as full of the pure joy of cinema as any film of the decade
  14. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    My Best Picture lineup for this year would be something like...

    United 93
    Children of Men
    The Departed
    Letters from Iwo Jima
    The Lives of Others

    Pretty decent year overall, I think. And I liked the Academy's lineup... except for friggin' Babel. Yuck.

    I really liked all the love for Little Miss Sunshine. I don't even mind the Best Picture nomination, even though it's not in my lineup. I like seeing films like this make their way into Best Picture - in fact, this cleared the way somewhat for stuff like Juno and The Kids Are All Right getting in, I suspect. Sideways might be the true predecessor. All in all, I thought this was one of the best comedies of recent times - the striptease at the end had me truly rolling in the aisles. I actually thought Breslin was more deserving of Best Supporting Actress than Hudson.

    United 93, for my money, is the film of the year. It is an experience like no other. Casting the German passenger as a coward is the sole sour note in this, which is Greengrass' masterpiece. I feel confident in saying that - I doubt he'll ever be able to match this achievement. It was a brave move, and it paid off - I'm glad that the Directors branch decided to nominate him, but this should have taken the top prize, let alone be nominated.

    Casino Royale is probably one of the better tentpole films of the last few years. It's far from perfect, but it was real resuscitation of the Bond franchise, conducted with a bit of classiness. I'm not sure that I'd really give it a look-in in any of the major categories at all, but the song was far better than any of the nominees, let alone the winner.

    Children of Men is a real accomplishment. Cuaron's best (that I've seen), and conducted with an uncommon degree of chutzpah. A travesty that it didn't win Best Cinematography. Cuaron really should have been represented in Best Director, instead of Frears' rather TV-like and anonymous handling of The Queen.

    I do love me The Departed, just as pure entertainment. It does run a bit too long, but it's heaps of fun. Wahlberg's nomination doesn't surprise me at all - it's not just cursing; he's heir apparent to the long line of what I class as "Scorsese firebrands," - people like De Niro (in Mean Streets and New York, New York), Keitel (in Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore and Last Temptation), Pesci (in everything), Sandra Bernhard, Daniel Day-Lewis, and heck, even Cate Blanchett. It's all about that Cagney-style boiling rage that the given character is fighting too hard to suppress, so that they inevitably end up letting loose in a very loud, ostentatious torrent. Most of all, he's pretty damn funny. Nominate some other guys in Supporting from The Departed, but Wahlberg always comes first for me. And would by my win, actually.

    Letters from Iwo Jima is something of a masterwork, I think. I'm very disappointed that Ken Watanabe didn't get into Best Actor - he's my win. This is probably the only time that I think Tom Stern's ultra-desaturated photography is a real asset to a film.

    The Lives of Others deserves all the accolades it gets, and more. It's a shame that the director really soiled his cinematic pantaloons with The Tourist, which is a real contender for WORST THING EVER. But The Lives of Others is still magnificent, and it's a darn shame that the late Ulrich Mühe didn't get a nomination.

    The Pursuit of Happyness is surprisingly good. I was expecting empty pap, and... yeah, I guess that's probably what it is, but I've gotta confess that it put a smile on my face. And Smith pours a lot into the role - it's a shameless Oscar grab, but there's real emotion in there. It's not a well made film, I guess, but it's acted so well that I go along with it.

    The Queen, in spite of its made-for-TV beginnings is very good, and the first example of Peter Morgan's keen wit that I came across. But for me, the performance of the film was never Mirren - it was al
  15. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1943

    Strangest Trivia from the 1943 Ceremony: Under the Best Song category, you?ll not a song called Pig Foot Pete listed as being from the movie Hellzapoppin?, a manic slapstick comedy. The song actually debuted in 1941, the year before Hellzapoppin?, in another movie; it wasn?t nominated then. The song does not even appear in Hellzapoppin?, and yet it was nominated for that movie! Get it? Me neither!

    BEST PICTURE

    49th Parallel
    Kings Row
    The Magnificent Ambersons
    Mrs. Miniver ? WINNER
    The Pied Piper
    The Pride of the Yankees
    Random Harvest
    The Talk of the Town
    Wake Island
    Yankee Doodle Dandy

    Of these, the three best are all dueling propaganda films: Mrs. Miniver is a warm hymn to British pluck, Yankee Doodle Dandy is a manic but sincere hymn to American ideals and 49th Parallel is a gripping thriller about American isolationism. Shockingly, they?re all three damn good movies, for all their propagandistic leanings. I?m honestly not sure if I?d pick Yankee Doodle Dandy or The 49th Parallel as the best of this bunch. Pride of the Yankees is also no slouch. The Magnificent Ambersons isn?t much of a movie; I wouldn?t have nominated it for anything except set direction. The Talk of the Town is even worse; as for Random Harvest, it?s . . . soapy, but not entertaining.

    But on to the obvious snubs; I?ve already pointed out three I?d kick to the curb, but there are even more than that that deserve a nom. First off, Jacques Tourneur?s seminal and still hair raisingly effective Cat People deserved a nomination. There may not be another scene from 1942 quite as timeless as the sequence in the deserted swimming pool from Cat People. God, what a masterpiece.

    Then, there?s comedy; To Be or Not To Be, which finds Jack Benny and Carole Lombard putting their theatrical talents to use to fluster the Nazis; Preston Sturges? maniacal The Palm Beach Story, which finds Joel McCrea and Claudette Colbert in an incredibly complicated relationship in the strange city of the title; and The Man Who Came to Dinner in which Monty Woolley gives a performance for the ages as a pretentious, irascible critic who finds himself injured and forced to recuperate in a town filled with people he loathes, since, after all, he loathes all people.

    Also, I can?t figure Now, Voyager not being nominated; if ever a film was the perfect Oscar winner, it?s Now, Voyager.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    James Cagney ? Yankee Doodle Dandy ? WINNER
    Ronald Colman ? Random Harvest
    Gary Cooper ? The Pride of the Yankees
    Walter Pidgeon ? Mrs. Miniver
    Monty Woolley ? The Pied Piper

    Of this group, the best one took it for sure. Cagney is a force of nature as the arrogant, exuberant, energetic George M. Cohan; it?s a charismatic performance of the type that only Cagney could give, absolutely balls to the walls. Cooper is good in The Pride of the Yankees and Pidgeon is, for once, serviceable in Mrs. Miniver.

    What about Jack Benny as the pretentious, foppish actor who finds a cause in the fight against Nazism in To Be or Not To Be? Or Monty Woolley for The Man Who Came to Dinner; no one delivers bon mots like Woolley in this movie.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Bette Davis ? Now, Voyager
    Greer Garson ? Mrs. Miniver ? WINNER
    Katharine Hepburn ? Woman of the Year
    Rosalind Russell ? My Sister Eileen
    Teresa Wright ? The Pride of the Yankees

    Hepburn?s performance as a modern woman now seems somewhat unpolitically correct, but who cares? The climax, as she struggles to fix a meal, is a tour de force of comedy acting. Garson is really quite wonderful in Mrs. Miniver and is, I think, by sheer force of her beautiful performance, responsible for most of the praise the film itself gets; she elevates it with her serene performance. But Davis is astounding in Now, Voyager, one of her most nuanced and perfect performances. In the scenes after her stay in the institution, you sense a radiating fragility in every move she makes; she is better, but a relapse is written on eve
  16. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    BEST PICTURE

    49th Parallel
    Kings Row
    The Magnificent Ambersons
    Mrs. Miniver ? WINNER
    The Pied Piper
    The Pride of the Yankees
    Random Harvest
    The Talk of the Town
    Wake Island
    Yankee Doodle Dandy

    I agree that "Cat People" and "Now, Voyager" are better any of these. I like "The Magnificent Ambersons" better and "49th Parallel" much less (only the middle episode is any good); than you do. I don't much like "To Be or Not to Be"

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    James Cagney ? Yankee Doodle Dandy ? WINNER
    Ronald Colman ? Random Harvest
    Gary Cooper ? The Pride of the Yankees
    Walter Pidgeon ? Mrs. Miniver
    Monty Woolley ? The Pied Piper

    Cagney. It's great, if still not his greatest performance, which is Cody Jarrett in "White Heat".

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Bette Davis ? Now, Voyager
    Greer Garson ? Mrs. Miniver ? WINNER
    Katharine Hepburn ? Woman of the Year
    Rosalind Russell ? My Sister Eileen
    Teresa Wright ? The Pride of the Yankees

    Davis is terribly mannered, and she often enrages me; but yeah, this should have been her year. Great performance. Lucille Ball should have at least had a nom for "The Big Street"

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    William Bendix ? Wake Island
    Van Heflin ? Johnny Eager ? WINNER
    Walter Huston ? Yankee Doodle Dandy
    Frank Morgan ? Tortilla Flat
    Henry Travers ? Mrs. Miniver

    Vallee's funny, but what about Claude Rains in "Now, Voyager"?

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Gladys Cooper ? Now, Voyager
    Agnes Moorehead ? The Magnificent Ambersons
    Susan Peters ? Random Harvest
    Dame May Whitty ? Mrs. Miniver
    Teresa Wright ? Mrs. Miniver ? WINNER

    Moorehead or Cooper, who is a cold female brute if there ever was one.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Michael Curtiz ? Yankee Doodle Dandy
    John Farrow ? Wake Island
    Mervyn LeRoy ? Random Harvest
    Sam Wood ? Kings Row
    William Wyler ? Mrs. Miniver ? WINNER

    Curtiz, Preston Sturges, or Tourneur. Or Hitchcock for "Saboteur"

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    Always in My Heart ? Always in My Heart
    Dearly Beloved ? You Were Never Lovelier
    How About You ? Babes on Broadway
    It Seems I Heard That Song Before ? Youth on Parade
    I?ve Got a Gal in Kalamazoo ? Orchestra Wives
    Love is a Song ? Bambi
    Pennies for Peppino ? Flying with Music
    Pig Foot Pete ? Hellzapoppin?
    There?s a Breeze on Lake Louise ? The Mayor of 44th Street
    White Christmas ? Holiday Inn ? WINNER

    "White Christmas"

    BEST MUSIC, SCORING OF A MUSICAL PICTURE

    Flying with Music ? Edward Ward
    For Me and My Gal ? Roger Edens, George Stoll
    Holiday Inn ? Robert Emmett Dolan
    It Started with Eve ? Charles Previn, Hans J. Salter
    Johnny Doughboy ? Walter Scharf
    My Gal Sal ? Alfred Newman
    Yankee Doodle Dandy ? Ray Heindorf, Heinz Roemheld ? WINNER
    You Were Never Lovelier ? Leigh Harline

    "For Me and My Gal" is pretty good, too.

    BEST MUSIC, SCORING OF A DRAMATIC OR COMEDY PICTURE

    Arabian Nights ? Frank Skinner
    Bambi ? Frank Churchill, Edward H. Plumb
    The Black Swan ? Alfred Newman
    The Corsican Brothers ? Dimitri Tiomkin
    Flying Tigers ? Victor Young
    The Gold Rush ? Max Terr
    I Married a Witch ? Roy Webb
    Joan of Paris ? Roy Webb
    Jungle Book ? Miklos Rozsa
    Klondike Fury ? Edward J. Kay
    Now, Voyager ? Max Steiner ? WINNER
    The Pride of the Yankees ? Leigh Harline
    Random Harvest ? Herbert Stothart
    The Shanghai Gesture ? Richard Hageman
    Silver Queen ? Victor Young
    Take a Letter, Darling ? Victor Young
    The Talk of the Town ? Friedrich Hollaender, Morris Stoloff
    To Be or Not to Be ? Werner R. Heymann

    "Now, Voyager"

  17. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1951

    BEST PICTURE

    All About Eve ? WINNER
    Born Yesterday
    Father of the Bride
    King Solomon?s Mines
    Sunset Blvd.

    Sunset Blvd and All About Eve are the clear contenders here. I quite enjoyed Born Yesterday; it?s a great comedy, but it can?t stack up next to Sunset or Eve. Father of the Bride hasn?t aged well; it just seems tired and bland now.

    I?d have thrown Winchester 73 up there in place of Father of the Bride. You could make a case for Harvey too. It seems absolutely idiotic that The Third Man wasn?t nominated.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Louis Calhern ? The Magnificent Yankee
    Jose Ferrer ? Cyrano de Bergerac ? WINNER
    William Holden ? Sunset Blvd.
    James Stewart ? Harvey
    Spencer Tracy ? Father of the Bride

    Stewart?s great in Harvey, but even better in Winchester 73. You get no argument from me on nominating Holden for Sunset Blvd., but I don?t think Tracy?s performance in Father of the Bride really holds up that well. One could very easily make a case for Humphrey Bogart?s chilling turn as a rage-filled screenwriter from Nicholas Ray?s In a Lonely Place; it?s one of his most terrifying turns. And Dean Stockwell is surprisingly excellent in the title role in an otherwise forgettable adaptation of Kim; not a performance I was expecting, but it works.

    But the best male lead performance of the year wasn?t even nominated; Joseph Cotten?s turn as Holly Martins in The Third Man is Cotten?s best performance, I think; Shadow of a Doubt is nearly as good, but Martins is a harder part to get right and Cotten nails it to perfection. I?d have given him the Oscar.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Anne Baxter ? All About Eve
    Bette Davis ? All About Eve
    Judy Holliday ? Born Yesterday ? WINNER
    Eleanor Parker ? Caged
    Gloria Swanson ? Sunset Blvd.

    Clearly Swanson and Davis split the vote, thus giving it to Holliday. This is not to say that Holliday isn?t very funny in Born Yesterday; she is quite brilliant. But Davis is the one I would have liked to see get this one; all her diva qualities rise to the top in this performance, but Margo Channing is a diva, so it works to absolute perfection. A great performance. Swanson is hammy, but rampagingly entertaining and, like the Davis/Channing thing, it works because Norma Desmond is a ham.

    On the unfairly snubbed front, I have to throw some love to Hedy Lamarr for Samson & Delilah; the film is not great and it?s hard to say if Lamarr is actually ?acting? in the movie or not, but her simmering sexuality is on fine display. Sixty years later, she?s still the sexiest Delilah I?ve ever seen; I think I know why Sam laid down for that haircut now, thanks. She could have used a nomination. Also, in the so sexy it hurts category, Gloria Grahame for In a Lonely Place; she?s always very good, but this one is probably her most subtle performance and that still counts for something with me.


    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Jeff Chandler ? Broken Arrow
    Edmund Gwenn ? Mister 880
    Sam Jaffe ? The Asphalt Jungle
    George Sanders ? All About Eve ? WINNER
    Erich von Stroheim ? Sunset Blvd.

    Sanders is a joy forever in All About Eve; ?You have a point. An idiotic one, but a point.? I have no trouble with him winning this. Von Stroheim is good in Sunset Blvd, maybe a little stiff.

    It would have been nice to see Dan Duryea nominated for his supporting turn as a neurotic bully in Winchester 73. And what about Neville Brand for D.O.A.? Despite its iconic status, D.O.A. is actually a pretty bad movie. The female lead is awful, Tiomkin?s score is desperately awful and the energy level isn?t where it should be. But when Brand shows up, over an hour into the proceedings, as memory serves, as a psychopathic gunman, he really brings his A-game. He may only be in the film for fifteen minutes or so, but damned if he isn?t the best thing in it. Another worthy contender would be Broderick Crawford for Born Yesterday as a meat-headed thug trying to rise in politics; he?s simultaneously fun
  18. Champion of the Force Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 27, 1999
    star 4
    Your comments re: Samson & Delilah urged me enough to go and look up about the film again (having not seen it in many years), yet from reading up about the film it seems it was released in 1949 so it wouldn't have been in contention this year anyway?

    EDIT: seems I lie - I now see that it was nominated for other Oscars in 1950 (ie. 1951 ceremony), curious about the difference between release year and year of nomination.
  19. corran2 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 16, 2006
    star 4
    Best score easily goes to the Third Man. The zither is brilliant; one of my favorite scores.
  20. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    This happens a lot in some of those older Oscar ceremonies and I'm puzzled about it too. I understand when it happens with foreign films, when the year of US release, rather than the year of original release in country of origin is used by the Oscars, which kind of makes sense. But when it happens with US releases . . . I'm baffled. Casablanca is a similar case. It was released in 1942, but wasn't nominated for anything in 1943; in 1944, it cleaned up at the ceremony. I dunno what the deal is with that stuff. Confusing.
  21. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1951

    BEST PICTURE

    All About Eve ? WINNER
    Born Yesterday
    Father of the Bride
    King Solomon?s Mines
    Sunset Blvd.

    Sunset Blvd and All About Eve are the clear contenders here. I quite enjoyed Born Yesterday; it?s a great comedy, but it can?t stack up next to Sunset or Eve. Father of the Bride hasn?t aged well; it just seems tired and bland now.

    I?d have thrown Winchester 73 up there in place of Father of the Bride. You could make a case for Harvey too. It seems absolutely idiotic that The Third Man wasn?t nominated.

    "King Solomon's Mines"? I agree "Winchester '73" and "The Third Man" should have been nom'd.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Louis Calhern ? The Magnificent Yankee
    Jose Ferrer ? Cyrano de Bergerac ? WINNER
    William Holden ? Sunset Blvd.
    James Stewart ? Harvey
    Spencer Tracy ? Father of the Bride

    Stewart?s great in Harvey, but even better in Winchester 73. You get no argument from me on nominating Holden for Sunset Blvd., but I don?t think Tracy?s performance in Father of the Bride really holds up that well. One could very easily make a case for Humphrey Bogart?s chilling turn as a rage-filled screenwriter from Nicholas Ray?s In a Lonely Place; it?s one of his most terrifying turns. And Dean Stockwell is surprisingly excellent in the title role in an otherwise forgettable adaptation of Kim; not a performance I was expecting, but it works.

    But the best male lead performance of the year wasn?t even nominated; Joseph Cotten?s turn as Holly Martins in The Third Man is Cotten?s best performance, I think; Shadow of a Doubt is nearly as good, but Martins is a harder part to get right and Cotten nails it to perfection. I?d have given him the Oscar.

    Agreed re: Cotten, Stewart and Bogart.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Anne Baxter ? All About Eve
    Bette Davis ? All About Eve
    Judy Holliday ? Born Yesterday ? WINNER
    Eleanor Parker ? Caged
    Gloria Swanson ? Sunset Blvd.

    Clearly Swanson and Davis split the vote, thus giving it to Holliday. This is not to say that Holliday isn?t very funny in Born Yesterday; she is quite brilliant. But Davis is the one I would have liked to see get this one; all her diva qualities rise to the top in this performance, but Margo Channing is a diva, so it works to absolute perfection. A great performance. Swanson is hammy, but rampagingly entertaining and, like the Davis/Channing thing, it works because Norma Desmond is a ham.

    On the unfairly snubbed front, I have to throw some love to Hedy Lamarr for Samson & Delilah; the film is not great and it?s hard to say if Lamarr is actually ?acting? in the movie or not, but her simmering sexuality is on fine display. Sixty years later, she?s still the sexiest Delilah I?ve ever seen; I think I know why Sam laid down for that haircut now, thanks. She could have used a nomination. Also, in the so sexy it hurts category, Gloria Grahame for In a Lonely Place; she?s always very good, but this one is probably her most subtle performance and that still counts for something with me.

    Agreed re: Grahame. Hedy Lamarr is sexy and she helped invent computers, but acting? Nah. You're thinking with a part of your body three feet south of your brain, Rogue. Swanson acts well enough, except with her voice, which doesn't have much distinctiveness. Between Davis (who uses her mannerisms in the service of the performance for once) and Holliday, then. Both are very good, and it's a toss-up. Baxter's performance is quite dreadful, and I would have nom'd Maureen O'Hara in "Rio Grande".

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Jeff Chandler ? Broken Arrow
    Edmund Gwenn ? Mister 880
    Sam Jaffe ? The Asphalt Jungle
    George Sanders ? All About Eve ? WINNER
    Erich von Stroheim ? Sunset Blvd.

    Sanders is a joy forever in All About Eve; ?You have a point. An idiotic one, but a point.? I have no trouble with him winning this. Von Stroheim is good in Sunset Blvd, maybe a little stiff.

    It would have been nice to see Dan Duryea nominated for his supporting turn as a neurotic bully in Winchester 73. And what about Neville Brand for D.O.A.?
  22. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    CEREMONY YEAR: 2009

    BEST MOTION PICTURE OF THE YEAR

    The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
    Frost/Nixon
    Milk
    The Reader
    Slumdog Millionaire ? WINNER

    I have seen, it seems, almost none of the movies released this year. I guess in 2008 I just wasn?t going to the movies very often. This is also the last ceremony that I actually watched; I?m glad I did ? Jackman?s opening number is still one of the best things I?ve ever seen at the Oscars, a witty, snarky nod to recession era America via a series of bargain basement recreations of the movies in question. I will say, about this slate, that The Dark Knight clearly should have been nominated and I do not say that as a comic book nerd, but as a lover of cinema. Same goes for WALL-E, which was just amazing.

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Richard Jenkins ? The Visitor
    Frank Langella ? Frost/Nixon
    Sean Penn ? Milk ? WINNER
    Brad Pitt ? The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
    Mickey Rourke ? The Wrestler

    It was completely thrilling to see Richard Jenkins, a character actor so great he?s practically a national treasure, finally get an Oscar nom. Unfortunately, I didn?t catch any of these.

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Anne Hathaway ? Rachel Getting Married
    Angelina Jolie ? Changeling
    Melissa Leo ? Frozen River
    Meryl Streep ? Doubt
    Kate Winslet ? The Reader ? WINNER

    Couldn?t say.

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Josh Brolin ? Milk
    Robert Downey, Jr. ? Tropic Thunder
    Philip Seymour Hoffman ? Doubt
    Heath Ledger ? The Dark Knight ? WINNER
    Michael Shannon ? Revolutionary Road

    Ledger was fantastic in The Dark Knight, far better than I thought he?d be. Any other year and Downey, Jr. would have been the obvious pick. It would have been fantastic to see Gary Oldman also get a nod for The Dark Knight; he was something like astonishingly great.

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Amy Adams ? Doubt
    Penelope Cruz ? Vicky Cristina Barcelona ? WINNER
    Viola Davis ? Doubt
    Taraji P. Henson ? The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
    Marisa Tomei ? The Wrestler

    Couldn?t say.

    BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN DIRECTING

    Danny Boyle ? Slumdog Millionaire ? WINNER
    Stephen Daldry ? The Reader
    David Fincher ? The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
    Ron Howard ? Frost/Nixon
    Gus Van Sant ? Milk

    Couldn?t say. But I don?t know how Chris Nolan didn?t get a nom for The Dark Knight. The truck chase was one of the most gripping and uniquely directed action sequences I?ve seen in years. For that alone, I?d have nommed him. Though I won?t defend that weird bat vision thing at the end. Who could?

    BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC WRITTEN FOR MOTION PICTURES, ORIGINAL SONG

    Down to Earth ? WALL-E
    Jai Ho ? Slumdog Millionaire ? WINNER
    O Saya ? Slumdog Millionaire

    The decision to not nominate Springsteen for his gripping song from The Wrestler will surely go down as one of the dumbest decisions in Oscar history. What?s even worse is that they apparently didn?t nominate it because they were bound and determined to perform all the nominees as part of a medley, which is stupid on the face of it, and couldn?t figure out how to work the tragic folk song into all these up tempo numbers. Kudos to Peter Gabriel for refusing to participate in this musical abortion. Of the nominated songs, I will say the right song won, but seriously, The Wrestler was the best song of the year. Clearly. Oscar, seriously, when you face off with the Boss, you lose.

    BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC WRITTEN FOR MOTION PICTURES, ORIGINAL SCORE

    The Curious Case of Benjamin Button ? Alexandre Desplat
    Defiance ? James Newton Howard
    Milk ? Danny Elfman
    Thomas Newman ? WALL-E
    Slumdog Millionaire ? A.R. Rahman ? WINNER

    Elfman?s score for Milk is surprisingly great and, even more shocking, pretty atypical. Elfman relies on his standard tics pretty seldom, which was great to hear. Newman?s work on WALL-E was pretty great too. Rahman?s score for Slumdog Millionair
  23. corran2 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 16, 2006
    star 4
    The Dark Knight remains the best film of 2008, consistently brilliant in literally every regard. And Ledger turns in quite possibly the greatest performance in film history. Yes, all of film history.

    Doubt is very underrated, but one of the best films of the year. Steep still has it, and any other year Hoffman would deserve the Oscar. But Viola Davis comes in and steals the whole show in about fifteen minutes of screen time.

    Slumdog Millionaire is a great film; suspenseful, heartfelt, humorous. But it wasn't the best film of the year.

    The Wrestler relies entirely on Rourke, who just bares his soul. I was in tears at the climax, leading right into one of the Boss's best songs. Rourke deserved the Oscar.

    Wall-e is a high mark for Pixar, coming in just after Toy Story 3 as their best in my book.
  24. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1987

    BEST PICTURE

    Children of a Lesser God
    Hannah & Her Sisters
    The Mission
    Platoon ? WINNER
    A Room with a View

    From the outset, it?s nigh onto impossible for me to quibble with Platoon as best picture of its year; it?s a magnificent, gripping, deeply felt and undeniably powerful film. It?s still probably Stone?s best movie.

    Of the other nominees, A Room with a View is a surprisingly great Merchant/Ivory production, perfect in nearly every way, right down the very smallest parts; it?s also a massive improvement on the somewhat lacking novel. The Mission is a show stopper too.

    On the unfairly snubbed front, there?s The Fly, which at the time probably looked like a trashy horror remake of a cheesy classic; but in the intervening years, it?s revealed surprising depth of emotion and symbolism. It may be the best horror film of the eighties. Michael Mann?s Manhunter isn?t particularly polished, but it?s a raw, pulsating adaptation of Harris? Red Dragon and it?s superior in every way, except for Ralph Fiennes? performance, to Ratner?s tepid remake. It would also have been nice to see Stand by Me nominated. And while you can see why it wasn?t nominated, Aliens holds up every bit as much as any of these nominated films. And we could say the same for Blue Velvet, probably more so actually.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Dexter Gordon ? ?Round Midnight
    Bob Hoskins ? Mona Lisa
    William Hurt ? Children of a Lesser God
    Paul Newman ? The Color of Money ? WINNER
    James Woods ? Salvador

    It would have been nice to see Jeff Goldblum nominated for his turn in The Fly; his performance is a surprising one, quirky, but full of passion. He begins as a charming rake, progresses into a somewhat unhinged obsessive and ends as a pitiful wreck. And they say horror isn?t Oscar bait. Controversially, I love William Peterson?s performance in Manhunter, a performance about fifty times better than the one Ed Norton gave in the same role in the remake; he gives us a Will Graham who isn?t just out of his depth, but also practically as loony as the Dragon he?s chasing. Jeremy Irons is pure conviction in The Mission; no one has ever delivered the line, ?God is love? with anything like this kind of power. He could have been nominated without a problem.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Jane Fonda ? The Morning After
    Marlee Matlin ? Children of a Lesser God ? WINNER
    Sissy Spacek ? Crimes of the Heart
    Kathleen Turner ? Peggy Sue Got Married
    Sigourney Weaver ? Aliens

    The nom for Sigourney Weaver is frigging awesome. She totally deserved the nom, but it?s still surprising that the Academy gave it to her.

    However, I?m trying to figure how Helena Bonham Carter didn?t get a nom for A Room with a View. It?s probably still her finest performance, subtle, honest, naturalistic, painful.


    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Tom Berenger ? Platoon
    Michael Caine ? Hannah & Her Sisters ? WINNER
    Willem Dafoe ? Platoon
    Denholm Elliott ? A Room with a View
    Dennis Hopper ? Hoosiers

    A slate of very good performances here; but the Hopper nomination is a stand in: the Academy was too afraid to nominate him for his turn as Frank Booth, the screen?s most terrifying villain by my lights, in Blue Velvet. He is good in Hoosiers, no question; but his turn as Frank Booth is his definitive performance and one for the ages. He should have been nominated for that one; and then he should have won.

    Setting Hopper aside, I think I?d have given this one to Denholm Elliott who is absolutely perfectly pitched in A Room with a View. Berenger and Dafoe are both near career best in Platoon.

    But, great as this slate is, I?ll name a few who could have also been nominated if the slate was a little bigger. Judge Reinhold gave a fantastically funny performance as the tightly wound neurotic kidnapped in Ruthless People. Kiefer Sutherland was a great villain, as he usually is, in Stand by Me. And Brian Dennehy?s gruff, nigh onto sociopathic cop was the biggest pleasure in F/X, a t
  25. Todd the Jedi Mod and Inquisitor of SWTV

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Oct 16, 2008
    star 5
    I haven't seen Stand by Me, so I can't comment on whether it deserved any awards or not. Platoon was brilliant, though, with great acting all around. Dafoe and Berenger were probably the best, but Charlie Sheen was great, as were Mark Moses and John C. McGinley. And no the last one has nothing to do with the fact that I love Scrubs. :p And even though it didn't exactly have an original score it had just the best selection of music. The Adagio for Strings was perfect for capturing the gritty feel of it all.

    The other good one I've seen was The Mission. Kind of an understated role for De Niro, but otherwise a great film. And yes it has a beautiful score. At least it won for cinematography.

    Aliens definitely deserved its best effects awards. Also I totally agree that Sigourney Weaver deserved her nom, as did Mean Green Mother.