Amph Hindsight is 20-20: Oscar Ceremonies of the Past (Disc. 1977)

Discussion in 'Community' started by Rogue1-and-a-half, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. corran2 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 16, 2006
    star 4
    Rogue, see Hannah and Her Sisters. Now.
  2. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1987

    BEST PICTURE

    Children of a Lesser God
    Hannah & Her Sisters
    The Mission
    Platoon ? WINNER
    A Room with a View

    From the outset, it?s nigh onto impossible for me to quibble with Platoon as best picture of its year; it?s a magnificent, gripping, deeply felt and undeniably powerful film. It?s still probably Stone?s best movie.

    Of the other nominees, A Room with a View is a surprisingly great Merchant/Ivory production, perfect in nearly every way, right down the very smallest parts; it?s also a massive improvement on the somewhat lacking novel. The Mission is a show stopper too.

    On the unfairly snubbed front, there?s The Fly, which at the time probably looked like a trashy horror remake of a cheesy classic; but in the intervening years, it?s revealed surprising depth of emotion and symbolism. It may be the best horror film of the eighties. Michael Mann?s Manhunter isn?t particularly polished, but it?s a raw, pulsating adaptation of Harris? Red Dragon and it?s superior in every way, except for Ralph Fiennes? performance, to Ratner?s tepid remake. It would also have been nice to see Stand by Me nominated. And while you can see why it wasn?t nominated, Aliens holds up every bit as much as any of these nominated films. And we could say the same for Blue Velvet, probably more so actually.

    Locked in a room and being forced to watch Merchant/Ivory is second on my torture list after locked in a room and being forced to watch Capricorn.

    "Ruthless People" is one of the funniest farces ever.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Dexter Gordon ? ?Round Midnight
    Bob Hoskins ? Mona Lisa
    William Hurt ? Children of a Lesser God
    Paul Newman ? The Color of Money ? WINNER
    James Woods ? Salvador

    It would have been nice to see Jeff Goldblum nominated for his turn in The Fly; his performance is a surprising one, quirky, but full of passion. He begins as a charming rake, progresses into a somewhat unhinged obsessive and ends as a pitiful wreck. And they say horror isn?t Oscar bait. Controversially, I love William Peterson?s performance in Manhunter, a performance about fifty times better than the one Ed Norton gave in the same role in the remake; he gives us a Will Graham who isn?t just out of his depth, but also practically as loony as the Dragon he?s chasing. Jeremy Irons is pure conviction in The Mission; no one has ever delivered the line, ?God is love? with anything like this kind of power. He could have been nominated without a problem.

    Irons or Hoskins. Sean Penn should have been nominated for "At Close Range" in which he is remarkable, and I am by no means a fan of his in the ordinary course.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Jane Fonda ? The Morning After
    Marlee Matlin ? Children of a Lesser God ? WINNER
    Sissy Spacek ? Crimes of the Heart
    Kathleen Turner ? Peggy Sue Got Married
    Sigourney Weaver ? Aliens

    The nom for Sigourney Weaver is frigging awesome. She totally deserved the nom, but it?s still surprising that the Academy gave it to her.

    However, I?m trying to figure how Helena Bonham Carter didn?t get a nom for A Room with a View. It?s probably still her finest performance, subtle, honest, naturalistic, painful.

    Weaver, even though she suffers from a bad case of being unable to read a line.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Tom Berenger ? Platoon
    Michael Caine ? Hannah & Her Sisters ? WINNER
    Willem Dafoe ? Platoon
    Denholm Elliott ? A Room with a View
    Dennis Hopper ? Hoosiers

    A slate of very good performances here; but the Hopper nomination is a stand in: the Academy was too afraid to nominate him for his turn as Frank Booth, the screen?s most terrifying villain by my lights, in Blue Velvet. He is good in Hoosiers, no question; but his turn as Frank Booth is his definitive performance and one for the ages. He should have been nominated for that one; and then he should have won.

    Setting Hopper aside, I think I?d have given this one to Denholm Elliott who is absolutely perfectly pitched in A Room with a View. Berenger and Dafoe are both near career best in Platoon.

    But, great as this slate is,
  3. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    CEREMONY YEAR: 2008

    BEST MOTION PICTURE OF THE YEAR

    Atonement
    Juno
    Michael Clayton
    No Country for Old Men ? WINNER
    There Will Be Blood

    I have no problem with the winner this year. No Country for Old Men may be my favorite Coen brothers film and I find it to be an absolutely perfect movie and certainly the best film from 2007 that I?ve seen. It?s a quintessentially American masterpiece, if you ask me.

    I?ll throw out a couple of snubs: James Mangold?s criminally underrated remake of 3:10 to Yuma was a rarity in all sorts of ways: a remake that actually worked, a great western flick, a perfectly acted psychological drama. Also, Stardust, the Neil Gaiman riff, which was an entirely sincere, witty and clever movie in a genre that hasn?t seen a really good movie in a very long time. This one deserves to stand up there with The Princess Bride. Great flick.


    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    George Clooney ? Michael Clayton
    Daniel Day-Lewis ? There Will Be Blood ? WINNER
    Johnny Depp ? Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
    Tommy Lee Jones ? In the Valley of Elah
    Viggo Mortensen ? Eastern Promises

    Good slate of nominees here. It?s particularly gratifying to see Mortensen get a nomination for Eastern Promises; he was totally robbed of a nomination for A History of Violence.

    But I think both Russell Crowe and Christian Bale deserved nominations for 3:10 to Yuma. They internalized their characters, a brutal criminal tired of violence and a psychologically damaged farmer aching for redemption, to a powerful degree and they made the men come absolutely to life. What?s even more stunning is how quiet and underplayed their performances here. This is a masterclass in acting, Crowe and Bale both playing their parts close to the chest and very, very quiet, when most actors would have taken both parts to the rafters, particularly Crowe?s part. Great performances.


    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Cate Blanchett ? Elizabeth: The Golden Age
    Julie Christie ? Away from Her
    Marion Cotillard ? La Vie en Rose ? WINNER
    Laura Linney ? The Savages
    Ellen Page ? Juno

    Couldn?t say for sure.

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Casey Affleck ? The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford
    Javier Bardem ? No Country for Old Men ? WINNER
    Philip Seymour Hoffman ? Charlie Wilson?s War
    Hal Holbrook ? Into the Wild
    Tom Wilkinson ? Michael Clayton

    Particularly thrilling to see Hal Holbrook nominated; he?s always great. In everything. Ever.

    Of these, I think Bardem deserved the win; his Chigurh is a great villainous performance. It would have been nice to see Tommy Lee Jones nominated for his role in the same movie; his turn as Ed Tom Bell is probably Jones? best performance in his lengthy and storied career.

    Also unfairly overlooked is Ben Foster for his turn as a preening, psychopathic, effeminate gunslinger in 3:10 to Yuma.


    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Cate Blanchett ? I?m Not There
    Ruby Dee ? American Gangster
    Saoirse Ronan ? Atonement
    Amy Ryan ? Gone Baby Gone
    Tilda Swinton ? Michael Clayton ? WINNER

    Swinton is always excellent, but it would have been a kick to see Cate Blanchett get this one. Her Bob Dylan impression in I?m Not There was particularly brilliant.

    BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN DIRECTING

    Paul Thomas Anderson ? There Will Be Blood
    Ethan Coen, Joel Coen ? No Country for Old Men ? WINNER
    Tony Gilroy ? Michael Clayton
    Jason Reitman ? Juno
    Julian Schnabel ? The Diving Bell & the Butterfly

    Correct one took this. Would have been nice to see James Mangold nominated for 3:10 to Yuma.

    BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC WRITTEN FOR MOTION PICTURES, ORIGINAL SONG

    Falling Slowly ? Once ? WINNER
    Happy Working Song ? Enchanted
    Raise It Up ? August Rush
    So Close ? Enchanted
    That?s How You Know ? Enchanted

    Right one took this one too. The absolute exuberance of the songwriters upon winning, and Jon Stewart?s hilarious riff on their win, was probably the single biggest highlight of the night.

    BEST A
  4. Todd the Jedi Mod and Sitcom Dad of SWTV

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Oct 16, 2008
    star 5
    A lot of good wins. Always good to see the Coen Bros. get recognition. However, I agree that 3:10 to Yuma was snubbed. I also think Chris Cooper and Keri Russell should have been nominated for Breach and Waitress, respectively.

    And I didn't see The Assassination of Jesse James but I have to wonder how good Casey Affleck was in it, since he was great in Gone Baby Gone of the same year.
  5. Drac39 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2002
    star 6
    I think eventually the Academy might regret being so kind to No Country for Old Men. That being said it is a really great film and goes against the Academy's track record for mainly awarding feel good pictures of the past decade or so. I think the choices here were fair enough, nothing strikes me as being robbed. I personally feel that Zodiac should have gotten some Academy recognition but it isn't as if it was snubbed for lesser films.
  6. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    2007 was such a strong year that you could have had 5 other films in there for BP and it still would have been totally satisfying. The fact that Zodiac didn't even get a look in is telling. Films like Sweeney Todd, Before the Devil Knows You're Dead, The Assassination of Jesse James, Gone Baby Gone, The Visitor, The Savages, The Kite Runner, Eastern Promises, The Bourne Ultimatum, Into the Wild, Breach, or even Hot Fuzz and Walk Hard could've got a look in and I wouldn't have complained.
  7. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    CEREMONY YEAR: 2008

    BEST MOTION PICTURE OF THE YEAR

    Atonement
    Juno
    Michael Clayton
    No Country for Old Men ? WINNER
    There Will Be Blood

    I have no problem with the winner this year. No Country for Old Men may be my favorite Coen brothers film and I find it to be an absolutely perfect movie and certainly the best film from 2007 that I?ve seen. It?s a quintessentially American masterpiece, if you ask me.

    I?ll throw out a couple of snubs: James Mangold?s criminally underrated remake of 3:10 to Yuma was a rarity in all sorts of ways: a remake that actually worked, a great western flick, a perfectly acted psychological drama. Also, Stardust, the Neil Gaiman riff, which was an entirely sincere, witty and clever movie in a genre that hasn?t seen a really good movie in a very long time. This one deserves to stand up there with The Princess Bride. Great flick.

    I agree about "3:10" and the winner's fine, I guess, but "The Assassination of Jesse James" should have had at least a nom.

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    George Clooney ? Michael Clayton
    Daniel Day-Lewis ? There Will Be Blood ? WINNER
    Johnny Depp ? Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
    Tommy Lee Jones ? In the Valley of Elah
    Viggo Mortensen ? Eastern Promises

    Good slate of nominees here. It?s particularly gratifying to see Mortensen get a nomination for Eastern Promises; he was totally robbed of a nomination for A History of Violence.

    But I think both Russell Crowe and Christian Bale deserved nominations for 3:10 to Yuma. They internalized their characters, a brutal criminal tired of violence and a psychologically damaged farmer aching for redemption, to a powerful degree and they made the men come absolutely to life. What?s even more stunning is how quiet and underplayed their performances here. This is a masterclass in acting, Crowe and Bale both playing their parts close to the chest and very, very quiet, when most actors would have taken both parts to the rafters, particularly Crowe?s part. Great performances.

    Yes, they are both very good, but how to choose? Day-Lewis was extraordinary, though, despite the film's absurd finish.

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Cate Blanchett ? Elizabeth: The Golden Age
    Julie Christie ? Away from Her
    Marion Cotillard ? La Vie en Rose ? WINNER
    Laura Linney ? The Savages
    Ellen Page ? Juno

    Couldn?t say for sure.

    Have seen none of these.

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Casey Affleck ? The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford
    Javier Bardem ? No Country for Old Men ? WINNER
    Philip Seymour Hoffman ? Charlie Wilson?s War
    Hal Holbrook ? Into the Wild
    Tom Wilkinson ? Michael Clayton

    Particularly thrilling to see Hal Holbrook nominated; he?s always great. In everything. Ever.

    Of these, I think Bardem deserved the win; his Chigurh is a great villainous performance. It would have been nice to see Tommy Lee Jones nominated for his role in the same movie; his turn as Ed Tom Bell is probably Jones? best performance in his lengthy and storied career.

    Also unfairly overlooked is Ben Foster for his turn as a preening, psychopathic, effeminate gunslinger in 3:10 to Yuma.

    I liked Foster, but this should have gone to Affleck. Though supporting role? What supporting role is this? It's a lead. And Brad Pitt could well have gotten a supporting nom as Jesse James. Affleck has a slow start, in a dislikable role, and by the end, he triumphs.

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Cate Blanchett ? I?m Not There
    Ruby Dee ? American Gangster
    Saoirse Ronan ? Atonement
    Amy Ryan ? Gone Baby Gone
    Tilda Swinton ? Michael Clayton ? WINNER

    Swinton is always excellent, but it would have been a kick to see Cate Blanchett get this one. Her Bob Dylan impression in I?m Not There was particularly brilliant.

    Didn't see that one. Amy Ryan.

    BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN DIRECTING

    Paul Thomas Anderson ? There Will Be Blood
    Ethan Coen, Joel Coen ? No Country for Old Men ? WINNER
    Tony Gilroy ? Michael Clayton
    Jason Reitman ? Juno
    Julian Schnab
  8. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1930

    Note: There are, for reasons obscure, two Oscar ceremonies in 1930. The first is in April and seems to cover mostly 1929. The second was in November and seems to cover the bulk of 1930. The ceremony from 1931, covered the remainder of 1930 and the bulk of 1931. It takes a while, as you can see, for the Oscars to settle into their current rhythm. We?ll cover the April 1930 ceremony in this post and the November 1930 one in my next post.

    BEST PICTURE

    Alibi
    The Broadway Melody ? WINNER
    The Hollywood Revue of 1929
    In Old Arizona
    The Patriot

    From the outset let me say that I am in the same boat as, I bet, most of you are; I?ve seen very few of the films from this year. Even someone not averse to watching films from the twenties still just doesn?t see as many of them as he or she might from the thirties or forties or on and on. But I?ll make a couple of comments.

    Here?s one: the Oscars started snubbing Hitchcock early. Blackmail is not as sophisticated as Hitch?s films from the thirties, but you can see the genius sparking and as early as 1929, Hitch is experimenting with using sound to tell his story and make his points. Blackmail deserved a nomination for Best Picture.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    George Bancroft ? Thunderbolt
    Warner Baxter ? In Old Arizona ? WINNER
    Chester Morris ? Alibi
    Paul Muni ? The Valiant
    Lewis Stone ? The Patriot

    Couldn?t say.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Ruth Chatterton ? Madame X
    Betty Compson ? The Barker
    Jeanne Eagels ? The Letter
    Corinne Griffith ? The Divine Lady
    Bessie Love ? The Broadway Melody
    Mary Pickford ? Coquette ? WINNER

    Couldn?t say.

    No Supporting Awards were given in the acting category this year

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Lionel Barrymore ? Madame X
    Harry Beaumont ? The Broadway Melody
    Irving Cummings ? In Old Arizona
    Frank Lloyd ? The Divine Lady, Weary River, Drag ? WINNER
    Ernst Lubitsch ? The Patriot

    Couldn?t say, but Hitchcock deserved a nomination for Blackmail.

    No music awards were given

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE

    Applause
    Big Business
    Blackmail
    Die Buchse der Pandora (Pandora?s Box)
    The Canary Murder Case
    Chelovek s Kino-Apparatom (Living Russia, or The Man with a Camera)
    Un Chien Andalou
    The Cocoanuts
    The Flying Fleet
    The Four Feathers
    Gold Diggers of Broadway
    H2O
    Hearts in Dixie
    The Iron Mask
    The Kiss
    Lambchops
    Liberty
    Little Johnny Jones
    The Million Dollar Collar
    On with the Show!
    Our Modern Maidens
    Piccadilly
    Rio Rita
    Sally
    Salute
    The Saturday Night Kid
    Seven Footprints to Satan
    Show Boat
    Spite Marriage
    Staroye I Novoye (Old & New)
    Sunnyside Up
    Tagebuch einer Verlorenen (Diary of a Lost Girl)
    The Taming of the Shrew
    Their Own Desire
    They Had to See Paris
    Untamed
    The Virginian
    The Way of Lost Souls
    The Wild Party
  9. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1930

    Note: There are, for reasons obscure, two Oscar ceremonies in 1930. The first is in April and seems to cover mostly 1929. The second was in November and seems to cover the bulk of 1930. The ceremony from 1931, covered the remainder of 1930 and the bulk of 1931. It takes a while, as you can see, for the Oscars to settle into their current rhythm. We?ll cover the April 1930 ceremony in this post and the November 1930 one in my next post.

    BEST PICTURE

    Alibi
    The Broadway Melody ? WINNER
    The Hollywood Revue of 1929
    In Old Arizona
    The Patriot

    From the outset let me say that I am in the same boat as, I bet, most of you are; I?ve seen very few of the films from this year. Even someone not averse to watching films from the twenties still just doesn?t see as many of them as he or she might from the thirties or forties or on and on. But I?ll make a couple of comments.

    Here?s one: the Oscars started snubbing Hitchcock early. Blackmail is not as sophisticated as Hitch?s films from the thirties, but you can see the genius sparking and as early as 1929, Hitch is experimenting with using sound to tell his story and make his points. Blackmail deserved a nomination for Best Picture.

    "Broadway Melody" and "The Hollywood Revue" are early talkie musicals; "Alibi" seems experimental; "In Old Arizona" is a Western, and no one has seen "The Patriot", a Lubitsch-directed film, because it's lost.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    George Bancroft ? Thunderbolt
    Warner Baxter ? In Old Arizona ? WINNER
    Chester Morris ? Alibi
    Paul Muni ? The Valiant
    Lewis Stone ? The Patriot

    Couldn?t say.

    I have seen none of these movies. Chester Morris was an early MGM star of no discernable charm or talent; Warner Baxter is pretty good in "The Prisoner of Shark Island", though. He won for a Western, too, which is some kind of amazing. Bancroft played a small role in "Stagecoach." Muni is hammy, and Stone (usually) pious.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Ruth Chatterton ? Madame X
    Betty Compson ? The Barker
    Jeanne Eagels ? The Letter
    Corinne Griffith ? The Divine Lady
    Bessie Love ? The Broadway Melody
    Mary Pickford ? Coquette ? WINNER

    Couldn?t say.

    Again, seen none of these, except Love in excerpts from "Melody" (it's awful). Chatterton's only role remembered today is Fran Dodsworth in "Dodsworth" in which she is very convincing as a selfish narcissistic idiot. Eagels died shortly after this movie, but I remember Pauline Kael's review describing her 'strangely corrupt beauty.' Griffith was one of those genteel and good-looking types. Never seen her. Pickford's role was a career award--even the critics of the day didn't think much of the film.

    No Supporting Awards were given in the acting category this year

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Lionel Barrymore ? Madame X
    Harry Beaumont ? The Broadway Melody
    Irving Cummings ? In Old Arizona
    Frank Lloyd ? The Divine Lady, Weary River, Drag ? WINNER
    Ernst Lubitsch ? The Patriot

    Couldn?t say, but Hitchcock deserved a nomination for Blackmail.

    Lionel Barrymore was better known as a director in the silents. Hammy as an actor. Raoul Walsh was supposed to direct "Arizona" but was injured in a car crash in which he lost his eye. Lloyd is a hack, but they tended to give awards for more work rather than good work. Of this lot, Lubitsch is the good director, but the movie itself is a drama, not really his strong suit (though he did lots of silent ones.) I agree re: Hitchcock. I have seen "Blackmail" recently, and it holds up and then some.

    No music awards were given

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE

    Applause is a famous Mamoulian film;
    Blackmail is an excellent early Hitchcock.
    Die Buchse der Pandora (Pandora?s Box) and Tagebuch einer Verlorenen (Diary of a Lost Girl) are both films directed by G. W. Pabst and star Louise Brooks. They are both famous. Seen only one Pabst film ("The Threepenny Opera"), but
  10. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1930

    This is, as noted previously, the second of two ceremonies held in 1930. This one, coming in November, seems to be mainly focused on films released during 1930, but a few from 1929 sneak in as well. I?m basically entirely unsure about the methodology on selection at this point.

    BEST PICTURE

    All Quiet on the Western Front ? WINNER
    The Big House
    Disraeli
    The Divorcee
    The Love Parade

    Undeniably the best film of the year actually won the prize this year. All Quiet is a masterpiece that holds up to this day. It?s a gripping, wonderful, devastating film.

    The Marx Brothers? Animal Crackers hasn?t held up as well as a lot of their other movies, but it?s still held up as well as most of the nominated films, I?d say.

    Also worthy of a nomination is Zemlya (Earth), a fantastic Soviet film about the conflict between a group of old fashioned farmers and a group of young Communists. It?s a fascinating, visceral film, full of the vibrant montages, iconography and energetic passion of the best Soviet cinema. It?s an unjustly forgotten masterpiece.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    George Arliss ? Disraeli, The Green Goddess ? WINNER
    Wallace Beery ? The Big House
    Maurice Chevalier ? The Big Pond, The Love Parade
    Ronald Colman ? Bulldog Drummond, Condemned
    Lawrence Tibbett ? The Rogue Song

    It?s interesting that now, of course, an actor can only be nominated for one role, while back in the old days, it was quite common; here you?ll note that three of the five nominees, including the winner, are nominated for two films.

    I haven?t seen any of these, but it still seems very strange that Lew Ayres isn?t nominated for All Quiet on the Western Front; it?s a great film, but Ayres performance is surprisingly good too, not as stagy as you might expect.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Nancy Carroll ? The Devil?s Holiday
    Ruth Chatterton ? Sarah & Son
    Greta Garbo ? Anna Christie, Romance
    Norma Shearer ? The Divorcee, Their Own Desire ? WINNER
    Gloria Swanson ? The Trespasser

    Garbo probably deserved this one. And why wasn?t Dietrich nominated for The Blue Angel?

    No supporting acting awards were given.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Clarence Brown ? Anna Christie, Romance
    Robert Z. Leonard ? The Divorcee
    Ernst Lubitsch ? The Love Parade
    Lewis Milestone ? All Quiet on the Western Front ? WINNER
    King Vidor ? Hallelujah!

    Milestone?s directing is stunning, vibrant and heartbreaking; from the long tracking shots of soldiers charging into machine gun fire to the hands reaching for the butterfly at the climax, Milestone?s direction is full of surprisingly sophisticated touches. He definitely deserves the award this year.

    No music awards were given.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE

    Abraham Lincoln
    L?Age d?Or
    Animal Crackers
    Another Fine Mess
    The Big Trail
    Der Blaue Engel (The Blue Angel)
    City Girl
    DuBarry, Woman of Passion
    The Floradora Girl
    Follow Thru
    Free & Easy
    From Stump to Ship
    Hell?s Angels
    A Lady to Love
    Laughter
    Le Petit Chaperon Rouge (Little Red Riding Hood)
    Liliom
    Madam Satan
    Menschen am Sonntag (People on Sunday)
    Monte Carlo
    Murder!
    Not So Dumb
    Our Blushing Brides
    Prix le Beaute (Beauty Prize)
    Pups is Pups
    Raffles
    Le Roman de Renard (The Story of the Fox)
    So This Is London
    Soup to Nuts
    The Texan
    The Unholy Three
    Way Out West
    Zemlya (Earth)
  11. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1930

    This is, as noted previously, the second of two ceremonies held in 1930. This one, coming in November, seems to be mainly focused on films released during 1930, but a few from 1929 sneak in as well. I?m basically entirely unsure about the methodology on selection at this point.

    BEST PICTURE

    All Quiet on the Western Front ? WINNER
    The Big House
    Disraeli
    The Divorcee
    The Love Parade

    Undeniably the best film of the year actually won the prize this year. All Quiet is a masterpiece that holds up to this day. It?s a gripping, wonderful, devastating film.

    The Marx Brothers? Animal Crackers hasn?t held up as well as a lot of their other movies, but it?s still held up as well as most of the nominated films, I?d say.

    Also worthy of a nomination is Zemlya (Earth), a fantastic Soviet film about the conflict between a group of old fashioned farmers and a group of young Communists. It?s a fascinating, visceral film, full of the vibrant montages, iconography and energetic passion of the best Soviet cinema. It?s an unjustly forgotten masterpiece.

    Definitely the best of those nom'd. "The Big House" is a MGM prison melodrama. "Disraeli" is the Warner Brothers bio, very dated. "The Divorcee" is unbelievably twee. "The Love Parade" is actually very good, but lightweight.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    George Arliss ? Disraeli, The Green Goddess ? WINNER
    Wallace Beery ? The Big House
    Maurice Chevalier ? The Big Pond, The Love Parade
    Ronald Colman ? Bulldog Drummond, Condemned
    Lawrence Tibbett ? The Rogue Song

    It?s interesting that now, of course, an actor can only be nominated for one role, while back in the old days, it was quite common; here you?ll note that three of the five nominees, including the winner, are nominated for two films.

    I haven?t seen any of these, but it still seems very strange that Lew Ayres isn?t nominated for All Quiet on the Western Front; it?s a great film, but Ayres performance is surprisingly good too, not as stagy as you might expect.

    George Arliss is completely forgotten today, with reason. He was a stage actor, with a line in bio-pics (the Duke of Wellington, the Rothschilds, Richelieu, etc.) Wallace Beery is no favorite of mine. Chevalier isn't really an actor, though he is an entertainer. Never seen Tibbett, who was a famous singer. Colman is the best actor in this bunch.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Nancy Carroll ? The Devil?s Holiday
    Ruth Chatterton ? Sarah & Son
    Greta Garbo ? Anna Christie, Romance
    Norma Shearer ? The Divorcee, Their Own Desire ? WINNER
    Gloria Swanson ? The Trespasser

    Garbo probably deserved this one. And why wasn?t Dietrich nominated for The Blue Angel?

    Shearer is a weird case. I've seen her in two silents--"He Who Gets Slapped" and "The Student Prince" both good performances, especially the latter. And she had some decent late performances--"Marie Antoinette" and "The Women". But in the early talkies, she's a blight, and this particular movie is rotten (yup, I've actually endured some of it.) Ruth Chatterton again--no idea about this one or the Swanson one. Garbo isn't particularly good in "Anna Christie" and I haven't seen "Romance".

    No supporting acting awards were given.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Clarence Brown ? Anna Christie, Romance
    Robert Z. Leonard ? The Divorcee
    Ernst Lubitsch ? The Love Parade
    Lewis Milestone ? All Quiet on the Western Front ? WINNER
    King Vidor ? Hallelujah!

    Milestone?s directing is stunning, vibrant and heartbreaking; from the long tracking shots of soldiers charging into machine gun fire to the hands reaching for the butterfly at the climax, Milestone?s direction is full of surprisingly sophisticated touches. He definitely deserves the award this year.

    Sergei Eisenstein's sour comment on "All Quiet"--'a good PhD thesis' has clouded its reputation, unfairly, I think. Brown and Leonard are hacks (in general), Lubitsch is very good, and Vidor has a good reputation, but I don't like his stuff.

    No music awards were given.

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE

    Abraham Lincoln (directed by D. W. Griffith, but
  12. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1961

    BEST PICTURE

    The Alamo
    The Apartment ? WINNER
    Elmer Gantry
    Sons & Lovers
    The Sundowners

    I don?t understand why The Apartment would win this; in retrospect, it?s a light comedy, with too much sentiment for its own good. Fred MacMurray is excellent and there are laughs, but it?s probably at least half an hour too long and a lot of angst could be cut out without losing anything. Elmer Gantry is similarly flawed; Lancaster has visceral energy and presence, but the film is pretty muddled on what exactly it?s up to. It?s a good film, but like The Apartment, falls far short of a great one in my opinion.

    Five films better than any of these nominated films: Inherit the Wind, Spartacus, Psycho, The Magnificent Seven & Peeping Tom. Now that?s a Best Picture slate that isn?t embarrassing fifty years later.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Trevor Howard ? Sons & Lovers
    Burt Lancaster ? Elmer Gantry ? WINNER
    Jack Lemmon ? The Apartment
    Laurence Olivier ? The Entertainer
    Spencer Tracy ? Inherit the Wind

    Okay, before we go any farther . . . Anthony Perkins = not nominated for Psycho = Oscars lose all credibility forever. The end. I mean, seriously.

    Of these, I actually prefer Frederic March over Spencer Tracy in Inherit the Wind, though Tracy?s good too. Lemmon?s performance is strange, neurotic and not the kind to usually get an Oscar nomination. He has some good moments, but on the whole I don?t think he belongs here. Of these, the clear winner is definitely Lancaster who has a field day with Elmer Gantry. I?m not entirely clear on whether he?s ?good? or not, but . . . he deserves an Oscar, even if he isn?t.

    Couple others who might have been worth a nom: Carl Boehm as the psychopathic Mark Lewis in Peeping Tom and maybe Yul Brynner for his steely personification of badass in The Magnificent Seven.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Greer Garson ? Sunrise at Campobello
    Deborah Kerr ? The Sundowners
    Shirley MacLaine ? The Apartment
    Melina Mercouri ? Never on Sunday
    Elizabeth Taylor ? Butterfield 8 ? WINNER

    Anna Massey might be considered supporting for her role as the downstairs neighbor girl to the homicidal maniac in Peeping Tom, but it?s such a good performance that I have no problem bumping her up to lead. She deserved a nomination at least. MacLaine isn?t bad in The Apartment.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Peter Falk ? Murder, Inc.
    Jack Kruschen ? The Apartment
    Sal Mineo ? Exodus
    Peter Ustinov ? Spartacus ? WINNER
    Chill Wills ? The Alamo

    I refuse to quibble with Ustinov winning for Spartacus; he?s absolutely delightful in his performance there. It would have been nice to see Olivier nominated too though; I think his turn as Crassus in Spartacus is actually far and away his best performance, truly venal, never less than shallow and utterly cold.

    The pick of Kruschen for The Apartment is very odd; about the only person involved with The Apartment that actually deserved a nomination was Fred MacMurray, legitimately fantastic, cast against type as the slimy, amoral philanderer. He?s by far the best thing in the movie; I don?t know about MacMurray ? he should have played these kinds of parts more often, instead of the milktoast stuff. He really shines in this and Double Indemnity, two rare instances of him playing heavies of a sort. Why he wasn?t nominated, I do not understand. He definitely should have been; it?s the one Oscar The Apartment deserved a nomination for.

    Reaching a bit farther, I love Gene Kelly?s slimy, arrogant turn in Inherit the Wind; by all accounts, he wasn?t that likable in real life and, if that?s the case, this is a rare example of him letting all the warts through on camera. Also, Eli Wallach is perhaps not any ?good? in The Magnificent Seven, but he?s blisteringly effective and a total live wire. He could have been nominated, as far as I?m concerned.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Glynis Johns ? The Sundowners
    Shirley Jones ? Elmer Gantry ? WINNER
    Shirley Knight ? The Dark at the Top of the Stairs
    Janet Leigh ? Psyc
  13. Todd the Jedi Mod and Sitcom Dad of SWTV

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Oct 16, 2008
    star 5
    You'd think they'd at least have nominated Psycho for its music. When the music has such an effect on the viewers as to scare them ****less you know its composition is above-average in quality.
  14. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1961

    BEST PICTURE

    The Alamo
    The Apartment ? WINNER
    Elmer Gantry
    Sons & Lovers
    The Sundowners

    I don?t understand why The Apartment would win this; in retrospect, it?s a light comedy, with too much sentiment for its own good. Fred MacMurray is excellent and there are laughs, but it?s probably at least half an hour too long and a lot of angst could be cut out without losing anything. Elmer Gantry is similarly flawed; Lancaster has visceral energy and presence, but the film is pretty muddled on what exactly it?s up to. It?s a good film, but like The Apartment, falls far short of a great one in my opinion.

    Five films better than any of these nominated films: Inherit the Wind, Spartacus, Psycho, The Magnificent Seven & Peeping Tom. Now that?s a Best Picture slate that isn?t embarrassing fifty years later.

    "The Apartment" is not a light comedy; it's bathos with laughs. "Elmer Gantry" I agree with you on--great performances do not a movie make. "Inherit the Wind" can stay unnom'd, in my opinion. A lot too smug and schematic. Haven't seen "Peeping Tom"--the other three are fine.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Trevor Howard ? Sons & Lovers
    Burt Lancaster ? Elmer Gantry ? WINNER
    Jack Lemmon ? The Apartment
    Laurence Olivier ? The Entertainer
    Spencer Tracy ? Inherit the Wind

    Okay, before we go any farther . . . Anthony Perkins = not nominated for Psycho = Oscars lose all credibility forever. The end. I mean, seriously.

    Of these, I actually prefer Frederic March over Spencer Tracy in Inherit the Wind, though Tracy?s good too. Lemmon?s performance is strange, neurotic and not the kind to usually get an Oscar nomination. He has some good moments, but on the whole I don?t think he belongs here. Of these, the clear winner is definitely Lancaster who has a field day with Elmer Gantry. I?m not entirely clear on whether he?s ?good? or not, but . . . he deserves an Oscar, even if he isn?t.

    Couple others who might have been worth a nom: Carl Boehm as the psychopathic Mark Lewis in Peeping Tom and maybe Yul Brynner for his steely personification of badass in The Magnificent Seven.

    I agree re: Lancaster. It's a striking performance of some variety, and he's extremely well cast as a charismatic charlatan, but I'm just not sure what's going on in the movie, and the director and screenwriter appear to share the confusion. Brynner doesn't act, exactly; he gives a confident star performance, though. I prefer March to Tracy, too; Tracy being the liberal white knight in this case. Of the two, March has the better role. It might have been a more interesting movie had they switched the two roles, and then type-casting would not have protected them so much, and a clearer evaluation could be made. In the only movie in which I've seen Tracy play a villain (the Fleming "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde") he was quite unsettling as Hyde, so he was capable of much more subtlety that he usually got to show. And yes, Perkins is better than any of them, but he's playing a serial killer in a Hitchcock movie. As Joseph Cotten and Robert Walker could have told him, not the way to Hollywood acclaim.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Greer Garson ? Sunrise at Campobello
    Deborah Kerr ? The Sundowners
    Shirley MacLaine ? The Apartment
    Melina Mercouri ? Never on Sunday
    Elizabeth Taylor ? Butterfield 8 ? WINNER

    Anna Massey might be considered supporting for her role as the downstairs neighbor girl to the homicidal maniac in Peeping Tom, but it?s such a good performance that I have no problem bumping her up to lead. She deserved a nomination at least. MacLaine isn?t bad in The Apartment.

    She isn't good, either, but the movie conspired against her in this case. Deborah Kerr.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Peter Falk ? Murder, Inc.
    Jack Kruschen ? The Apartment
    Sal Mineo ? Exodus
    Peter Ustinov ? Spartacus ? WINNER
    Chill Wills ? The Alamo

    I refuse to quibble with Ustinov winning for Spartacus; he?s absolutely delightful in his performance there. It would have been nice to see Olivier nominated too though; I think his turn as C
  15. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    Not sure why I forgot to comment on Psycho under the best score. I think Hermann's best is Vertigo, but Psycho is a stark, menacing, brilliant score. Should have been nominated; any year without The Magnificent Seven, it should have won.
  16. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    Forgot that, too. Great music.
  17. corran2 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 16, 2006
    star 4
    Honestly, I'd give the edge to "Psycho" over "The Magnificent Seven". Herrmann's score ranges from the shrill and bombastic to the quieter, more quiet evil that is living underneath the surface.
  18. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1949

    BEST PICTURE

    Hamlet ? WINNER
    Johnny Belinda
    The Red Shoes
    The Snake Pit
    The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

    Of these I?ve seen only Hamlet and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. Of those two, Sierra Madre is far superior. Olivier?s Hamlet is not very good, frankly; the best thing about it is the fantastic, bleak set design. I?m a Shakespeare aficionado, but I barely made it through this one.

    I wouldn?t have minded a nomination for the ultra-serious docudrama Call Northside 777, with Jimmy Stewart as a journalist reopening a ten year old murder case. Less serious, but still better than Hamlet are:

    Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, in which Cary Grant loses his mind in the minutiae of construction
    Rope, in which Hitchcock has a subpar script and subpar actors and decides to go hog wild with his direction
    The Big Clock, which is a noir film with a great, tense hook


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Lew Ayres ? Johnny Belinda
    Montgomery Clift ? The Search
    Dan Dailey ? When My Baby Smiles at Me
    Laurence Olivier ? Hamlet ? WINNER
    Clifton Webb ? Sitting Pretty

    I don?t know why on earth Bogart wasn?t nominated for The Treasure of the Sierra Madre; it?s one of his best performances, a feral, mean turn that stands out even in a career full of them. He probably should have won this year actually; he definitely should have won over Olivier?s fey Hamlet. Not terrible, but not great either.

    I?d make a case for Jimmy Stewart for Rope; the film is a lesser Hitchcock, of course, but Stewart?s turn, as a philosophically hypocritical professor that unwittingly inspires a murder, is a pretty dark one. The less said about everyone else in the movie, the better.

    You could conceivably nominate Cary Grant for Mr. Blandings.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Ingrid Bergman ? Joan of Arc
    Olivia de Havilland ? The Snake Pit
    Irene Dunne ? I Remember Mama
    Barbara Stanwyck ? Sorry, Wrong Number
    Jane Wyman ? Johnny Belinda ? WINNER

    Joan of Arc is incredibly stagy and has all the flaws of costume dramas of the period; but Bergman is very good in it. I don?t contest her nomination. I also don?t contest Stanwyck, who is very good in the tense thriller Sorry Wrong Number, in which she plays an invalid who overhears a murder plot over crossed wires on her telephone and then spends a good hour and a half trying to get someone to believe her. The movie is not perfect and you can tell that it?s been expanded from a half hour radio play, but Stanwyck is game for anything.

    I really don?t know how the Academy overlooked Myrna Loy?s wonderful performance in Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House; the scene in which she goes through a lengthy litany of all the different paint colors she wants is comedy gold. She?s wonderful and charming and deserved a nom at least.


    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Charles Bickford ? Johnny Belinda
    Jose Ferrer ? Joan of Arc
    Oskar Homolka ? I Remember Mama
    Walter Huston ? The Treasure of the Sierra Madre ? WINNER
    The Luck of the Irish ? Cecil Kellaway

    Walter Huston?s performance in Sierra Madre is probably not a ?good? performance, but it?s damned entertaining, so I have no problem with this. Ferrer is pretty bland in Joan of Arc; weird nomination.

    A couple of other obscure performances that I?d have loved to have seen nominated:

    Dan O?Herlihy for his performance as Macduff in Orson Welles? horrible Macbeth; Welles? Macbeth is an awful movie (Jeannette Nolan is Lady Macbeth, if that?s any kind of clue) but O?Herlihy gives a real performance as Macduff; the scene where he finds out about the massacre of his family is the movie?s only really great scene

    George Coulouris, for his strange, menacing performance in Sleep, My Love; Sleep, My Love is about Don Ameche trying to drive his wife, Claudette Colbert, round the bend. It?s at times a gloriously silly movie, but Coulouris, one of my favorite character actors, is absolutely wonderful in the couple of scenes he gets as a strange, mysterious figure who may, or may not, be a hallucination. I might call Coulouris? perfo
  19. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1949

    BEST PICTURE

    Hamlet ? WINNER
    Johnny Belinda
    The Red Shoes
    The Snake Pit
    The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

    Of these I?ve seen only Hamlet and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. Of those two, Sierra Madre is far superior. Olivier?s Hamlet is not very good, frankly; the best thing about it is the fantastic, bleak set design. I?m a Shakespeare aficionado, but I barely made it through this one.

    I wouldn?t have minded a nomination for the ultra-serious docudrama Call Northside 777, with Jimmy Stewart as a journalist reopening a ten year old murder case. Less serious, but still better than Hamlet are:

    Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, in which Cary Grant loses his mind in the minutiae of construction
    Rope, in which Hitchcock has a subpar script and subpar actors and decides to go hog wild with his direction
    The Big Clock, which is a noir film with a great, tense hook

    I haven't seen "The Snake Pit", and of the rest, "The Red Shoes" and "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre" are the best. "Fort Apache", "Letter From an Unknown Woman", "Oliver Twist" and "Red River" should have nom'd.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Lew Ayres ? Johnny Belinda
    Montgomery Clift ? The Search
    Dan Dailey ? When My Baby Smiles at Me
    Laurence Olivier ? Hamlet ? WINNER
    Clifton Webb ? Sitting Pretty

    I don?t know why on earth Bogart wasn?t nominated for The Treasure of the Sierra Madre; it?s one of his best performances, a feral, mean turn that stands out even in a career full of them. He probably should have won this year actually; he definitely should have won over Olivier?s fey Hamlet. Not terrible, but not great either.

    I?d make a case for Jimmy Stewart for Rope; the film is a lesser Hitchcock, of course, but Stewart?s turn, as a philosophically hypocritical professor that unwittingly inspires a murder, is a pretty dark one. The less said about everyone else in the movie, the better.

    You could conceivably nominate Cary Grant for Mr. Blandings.

    Bogart for "Treasure", Henry Fonda for "Fort Apache" or John Wayne for "Red River". Van Heflin in "Act of Violence"

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Ingrid Bergman ? Joan of Arc
    Olivia de Havilland ? The Snake Pit
    Irene Dunne ? I Remember Mama
    Barbara Stanwyck ? Sorry, Wrong Number
    Jane Wyman ? Johnny Belinda ? WINNER

    Joan of Arc is incredibly stagy and has all the flaws of costume dramas of the period; but Bergman is very good in it. I don?t contest her nomination. I also don?t contest Stanwyck, who is very good in the tense thriller Sorry Wrong Number, in which she plays an invalid who overhears a murder plot over crossed wires on her telephone and then spends a good hour and a half trying to get someone to believe her. The movie is not perfect and you can tell that it?s been expanded from a half hour radio play, but Stanwyck is game for anything.

    I really don?t know how the Academy overlooked Myrna Loy?s wonderful performance in Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House; the scene in which she goes through a lengthy litany of all the different paint colors she wants is comedy gold. She?s wonderful and charming and deserved a nom at least.

    Wyman is good, but Joan Fontaine in "Letter From an Unknown Woman is also a possibility.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Charles Bickford ? Johnny Belinda
    Jose Ferrer ? Joan of Arc
    Oskar Homolka ? I Remember Mama
    Walter Huston ? The Treasure of the Sierra Madre ? WINNER
    The Luck of the Irish ? Cecil Kellaway

    Walter Huston?s performance in Sierra Madre is probably not a ?good? performance, but it?s damned entertaining, so I have no problem with this. Ferrer is pretty bland in Joan of Arc; weird nomination.

    A couple of other obscure performances that I?d have loved to have seen nominated:

    Dan O?Herlihy for his performance as Macduff in Orson Welles? horrible Macbeth; Welles? Macbeth is an awful movie (Jeannette Nolan is Lady Macbeth, if that?s any kind of clue) but O?Herlihy gives a real performance as Macduff; the scene where he finds out about the massacre of his family is the movie?s only really great scene

    George Coulouri
  20. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1970

    BEST PICTURE

    Anne of the Thousand Days
    Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid
    Hello, Dolly
    Midnight Cowboy ? WINNER
    Z

    Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid is a near perfect buddy movie; Midnight Cowboy is probably the most depressing American movie ever made and a fine work of art. Z is a magnificent paranoid thriller that, in my opinion, is the one that should have won the Oscar this year.

    Would have loved to have seen On Her Majesty?s Secret Service, still one of the two or three best James Bond movies ever, nominated. And The Wild Bunch most definitely deserved a nomination; if not for Z, I?d give the Oscar to The Wild Bunch without hesitation. Z barely nudges it out, though.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Richard Burton ? Anne of the Thousand Days
    Dustin Hoffman ? Midnight Cowboy
    Peter O?Toole ? Goodbye, Mr. Chips
    Jon Voight ? Midnight Cowboy
    John Wayne ? True Grit ? WINNER

    Wayne?s a heckuva of a lot of fun in True Grit; no one, but no one, could deliver that ?fill your hand, you sonuvabitch? like he did. I?d bet that Voight and Hoffman split the vote, though, both being nominated from Midnight Cowboy. Wayne?s fun, but Hoffman and Voight are both revelatory. Voight has definitely never been better; maybe not Hoffman either.

    A couple of others that definitely should have been nominated:

    William Holden, for his career best turn as the aging, weary leader of the gang in The Wild Bunch
    Jean-Louis Trintignant for his work as the icy, calculating investigator in Z; his barked ?Nom, prenom, profession? has entered my personal canon of great movie lines and his stare would freeze a lava flow

    And, though this one?s a bit of a stretch, what about James Garner for his charismatic, affable presence in Support Your Local Sheriff? It?s not exactly ?Great Acting,? but it?s incredibly fun to watch.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Genevieve Bujold ? Anne of the Thousand Days
    Jane Fonda ? They Shoot Horses, Don?t They?
    Lize Minnelli ? The Sterile Cuckoo
    Jean Simmons ? The Happy Ending
    Maggie Smith ? The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie ? WINNER

    Maggie Smith is a force of nature in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. I have no trouble with her winning. Also, what kind of a movie title is The Sterile Cuckoo?

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Rupert Crosse ? The Reivers
    Elliott Gould ? Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
    Jack Nicholson ? Easy Rider
    Anne of the Thousand Days ? Anthony Quayle
    Gig Young ? They Shoot Horses, Don?t They? ? WINNER

    Nicholson is a hoot in Easy Rider.

    Here?s a few other options:

    Jack Elam in a finely tuned comic performance in Support Your Local Sheriff!
    Yves Montand as the doomed politician in Z; he?s barely in the movie, but the impression is stark and vivid

    Actually, I think the guy who should have won this year was Robert Ryan, for his outstanding performance as the haunted outlaw turned outlaw hunter in The Wild Bunch. Wasn?t even nominated. Idiots.


    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Catherine Burns ? Last Summer
    Dyan Cannon ? Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
    Goldie Hawn ? Cactus Flower ? WINNER
    Sylvia Miles ? Midnight Cowboy
    Susannah York ? They Shoot Horses, Don?t They?

    Couldn?t say.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Costa-Gavras ? Z
    George Roy Hill ? Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid
    Arthur Penn ? Alice?s Restaurant
    Sydney Pollack ? They Shoot Horses, Don?t They?
    John Schlesinger ? Midnight Cowboy ? WINNER

    Costa-Gavras probably deserved the win. But where?s Peckinpah for his slow motion massacres in The Wild Bunch. Deserved a nom, at the very least, and maybe a win.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    Come Saturday Morning ? The Sterile Cuckoo
    Jean ? The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
    Raindrops Keep Fallin? on my Head ? Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid ? WINNER
    True Grit ? True Grit
    What Are You Doing for the Rest of Your Life? ? The Happy Ending
    Even knowing that my reputation will never quite recover after I say this, I?m going to go ahead: I kind of love Raindrops Keep Fallin? on My Head. The song from Jean Brodie isn?t much of anything. Probably What Are You Doing for the
  21. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1970

    BEST PICTURE

    Anne of the Thousand Days
    Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid
    Hello, Dolly
    Midnight Cowboy ? WINNER
    Z

    Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid is a near perfect buddy movie; Midnight Cowboy is probably the most depressing American movie ever made and a fine work of art. Z is a magnificent paranoid thriller that, in my opinion, is the one that should have won the Oscar this year.

    Would have loved to have seen On Her Majesty?s Secret Service, still one of the two or three best James Bond movies ever, nominated. And The Wild Bunch most definitely deserved a nomination; if not for Z, I?d give the Oscar to The Wild Bunch without hesitation. Z barely nudges it out, though.

    The Wild Bunch.

    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Richard Burton ? Anne of the Thousand Days
    Dustin Hoffman ? Midnight Cowboy
    Peter O?Toole ? Goodbye, Mr. Chips
    Jon Voight ? Midnight Cowboy
    John Wayne ? True Grit ? WINNER

    Wayne?s a heckuva of a lot of fun in True Grit; no one, but no one, could deliver that ?fill your hand, you sonuvabitch? like he did. I?d bet that Voight and Hoffman split the vote, though, both being nominated from Midnight Cowboy. Wayne?s fun, but Hoffman and Voight are both revelatory. Voight has definitely never been better; maybe not Hoffman either.

    A couple of others that definitely should have been nominated:

    William Holden, for his career best turn as the aging, weary leader of the gang in The Wild Bunch
    Jean-Louis Trintignant for his work as the icy, calculating investigator in Z; his barked ?Nom, prenom, profession? has entered my personal canon of great movie lines and his stare would freeze a lava flow

    And, though this one?s a bit of a stretch, what about James Garner for his charismatic, affable presence in Support Your Local Sheriff? It?s not exactly ?Great Acting,? but it?s incredibly fun to watch.

    Wayne's very good. Hoffman is schtick. Voight also very good. But perhaps it should have been William Holden in "The Wild Bunch."

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Genevieve Bujold ? Anne of the Thousand Days
    Jane Fonda ? They Shoot Horses, Don?t They?
    Lize Minnelli ? The Sterile Cuckoo
    Jean Simmons ? The Happy Ending
    Maggie Smith ? The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie ? WINNER

    Maggie Smith is a force of nature in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. I have no trouble with her winning. Also, what kind of a movie title is The Sterile Cuckoo?

    A bad one. Fonda could have won, but I prefer Smith.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Rupert Crosse ? The Reivers
    Elliott Gould ? Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
    Jack Nicholson ? Easy Rider
    Anne of the Thousand Days ? Anthony Quayle
    Gig Young ? They Shoot Horses, Don?t They? ? WINNER

    Nicholson is a hoot in Easy Rider.

    Here?s a few other options:

    Jack Elam in a finely tuned comic performance in Support Your Local Sheriff!
    Yves Montand as the doomed politician in Z; he?s barely in the movie, but the impression is stark and vivid

    Actually, I think the guy who should have won this year was Robert Ryan, for his outstanding performance as the haunted outlaw turned outlaw hunter in The Wild Bunch. Wasn?t even nominated. Idiots.

    A great, great underrated actor gets my vote--Ryan. He's wonderful.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Catherine Burns ? Last Summer
    Dyan Cannon ? Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
    Goldie Hawn ? Cactus Flower ? WINNER
    Sylvia Miles ? Midnight Cowboy
    Susannah York ? They Shoot Horses, Don?t They?

    Couldn?t say.

    Tough year.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Costa-Gavras ? Z
    George Roy Hill ? Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid
    Arthur Penn ? Alice?s Restaurant
    Sydney Pollack ? They Shoot Horses, Don?t They?
    John Schlesinger ? Midnight Cowboy ? WINNER

    Costa-Gavras probably deserved the win. But where?s Peckinpah for his slow motion massacres in The Wild Bunch. Deserved a nom, at the very least, and maybe a win.

    Peckinpah.

    BEST MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

    Come Saturday Morning ? The Sterile Cuckoo
    Jean ? The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
    Raindrops Keep Fallin? on my Head ? Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid ? WINNER
    True Grit ? True Grit
    What Are You Doing fo
  22. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1945

    BEST PICTURE

    Double Indemnity
    Gaslight
    Going My Way ? WINNER
    Since You Went Away
    Wilson

    Gaslight is fun, but light. Double Indemnity is the clear winner here; it?s such a taut, masterful, grim little thriller that I?m actually shocked that it was nominated. But it?s a great movie, one of the most quotable of all time, and one of the most perfect of all time too. It should have won.

    It would have been nice to see Preston Sturges? The Miracle of Morgan?s Creek nominated; it?s a wild, frantic, hysterical farce about sex, religion and patriotism. It?s a miracle that it even got released, so no mystery as to why it wasn?t nominated, but it?s still his best movie and one of the best of this year. Also, though it gives Nevermind hives, what about Arsenic & Old Lace?

    Also, Murder, My Sweet, in which Dick Powell is surprisingly great as Philip Marlowe and Laura, in which Dana Andrews becomes obsessed with a murder victim who isn?t quite what she appears to be, are both solid possibilities.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Charles Boyer ? Gaslight
    Bing Crosby ? Going My Way ? WINNER
    Barry Fitzgerald ? Going My Way
    Cary Grant ? None But the Lonely Heart
    Alexander Knox ? Wilson

    Boyer is good in Gaslight; it?s another case of a romantic leading man being surprisingly perfect as an amoral villain. Crosby has charm, but he?s no actor. Grant gets a rare nomination; it?s for a sentimental drama, of course, not one of his comedies.

    Unjustly overlooked:
    Fred MacMurray, for his pitch perfect, sleazy turn in Double Indemnity; we talked about this when we talked about The Apartment ? MacMurray was at his best playing rotten souls, not the lovable nuts he usually played and this is probably his very best performance.
    Eddie Bracken, as the neurotic, clumsy, hysterical heart of The Miracle of Morgan?s Creek; Bracken is often a bit too much for me, but in this manic film, he actually fits perfectly


    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Ingrid Bergman ? Gaslight ? WINNER
    Claudette Colbert ? Since You Went Away
    Bette Davis ? Mr. Skeffington
    Greer Garson ? Mrs. Parkington
    Barbara Stanwyck ? Double Indemnity

    Bergman is very, very good in Gaslight and Bette Davis is really too good in Mr. Skeffington: she?s so good as the shallow, superficial Fanny Skeffington that you can hardly stand to watch the movie. Stanwyck should have won this year; she?s the Femme Fatale in Double Indemnity. The scene where her husband is being strangled plays entirely on her face; you believe every second.

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Hume Cronyn ? The Seventh Cross
    Barry Fitzgerald ? Going My Way ? WINNER
    Claude Rains ? Mr. Skeffington
    Clifton Webb ? Laura
    Monty Woolley ? Since You Went Away

    Of these, Rains is given the most thankless titular role in history; he?s as good as anyone could be in the part, which is not very. Clifton Webb is a lot of fun in Laura; you actually buy that someone so obviously homosexual could still be obsessed with the title character, which is quite a tough sell.

    William Demarest should have been nominated for his riotously funny turn in The Miracle of Morgan?s Creek; Demarest was a Sturges regular and always one of the best things in any Sturges movie he was in, but this part is bigger than his usual ones and is surely the best performance in his career. Also, what about Raymond Massey for his brilliant spoof of Boris Karloff in Arsenic & Old Lace? Another great comedy performance unfairly snubbed.

    But the best supporting male performance of the year wasn?t even nominated. I?m talking about Edward G. Robinson in Double Indemnity. How the Academy didn?t even nominate him I don?t know. Only Robinson could sell that character, but he?s riveting to watch. ?Closer than that, Walter; closer than that.?


    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Ethel Barrymore ? None But the Lonely Heart ? WINNER
    Jennifer Jones ? Since You Went Away
    Angela Lansbury ? Gaslight
    Aline MacMahon ? Dragon Seed
    Agnes Moorehead ? Mrs. Parkington

    Of these, I?d give the nod to Angela Lansbury w
  23. The_Four_Dot_Elipsis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2005
    star 5
    Gaslight or Lifeboat for anything and everything; to hell with the rest of them. I like Laura, but it pales in comparison to what Preminger in the years to come (like, er, Rosebud).
  24. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1945

    BEST PICTURE

    Double Indemnity
    Gaslight
    Going My Way ? WINNER
    Since You Went Away
    Wilson

    Gaslight is fun, but light. Double Indemnity is the clear winner here; it?s such a taut, masterful, grim little thriller that I?m actually shocked that it was nominated. But it?s a great movie, one of the most quotable of all time, and one of the most perfect of all time too. It should have won.

    It would have been nice to see Preston Sturges? The Miracle of Morgan?s Creek nominated; it?s a wild, frantic, hysterical farce about sex, religion and patriotism. It?s a miracle that it even got released, so no mystery as to why it wasn?t nominated, but it?s still his best movie and one of the best of this year. Also, though it gives Nevermind hives, what about Arsenic & Old Lace?

    Also, Murder, My Sweet, in which Dick Powell is surprisingly great as Philip Marlowe and Laura, in which Dana Andrews becomes obsessed with a murder victim who isn?t quite what she appears to be, are both solid possibilities.

    Not "Arsenic and Old Lace". Of those nom'd: "Double Indemnity" or "Gaslight" of those nom'd. "To Have and Have Not" should have been nom'd.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Charles Boyer ? Gaslight
    Bing Crosby ? Going My Way ? WINNER
    Barry Fitzgerald ? Going My Way
    Cary Grant ? None But the Lonely Heart
    Alexander Knox ? Wilson

    Boyer is good in Gaslight; it?s another case of a romantic leading man being surprisingly perfect as an amoral villain. Crosby has charm, but he?s no actor. Grant gets a rare nomination; it?s for a sentimental drama, of course, not one of his comedies.

    Unjustly overlooked:
    Fred MacMurray, for his pitch perfect, sleazy turn in Double Indemnity; we talked about this when we talked about The Apartment ? MacMurray was at his best playing rotten souls, not the lovable nuts he usually played and this is probably his very best performance.
    Eddie Bracken, as the neurotic, clumsy, hysterical heart of The Miracle of Morgan?s Creek; Bracken is often a bit too much for me, but in this manic film, he actually fits perfectly

    Boyer.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Ingrid Bergman ? Gaslight ? WINNER
    Claudette Colbert ? Since You Went Away
    Bette Davis ? Mr. Skeffington
    Greer Garson ? Mrs. Parkington
    Barbara Stanwyck ? Double Indemnity

    Bergman is very, very good in Gaslight and Bette Davis is really too good in Mr. Skeffington: she?s so good as the shallow, superficial Fanny Skeffington that you can hardly stand to watch the movie. Stanwyck should have won this year; she?s the Femme Fatale in Double Indemnity. The scene where her husband is being strangled plays entirely on her face; you believe every second.

    Stanwyck or Bergman; Lauren Bacall in "To Have and Have Not."

    BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Hume Cronyn ? The Seventh Cross
    Barry Fitzgerald ? Going My Way ? WINNER
    Claude Rains ? Mr. Skeffington
    Clifton Webb ? Laura
    Monty Woolley ? Since You Went Away

    Of these, Rains is given the most thankless titular role in history; he?s as good as anyone could be in the part, which is not very. Clifton Webb is a lot of fun in Laura; you actually buy that someone so obviously homosexual could still be obsessed with the title character, which is quite a tough sell.

    William Demarest should have been nominated for his riotously funny turn in The Miracle of Morgan?s Creek; Demarest was a Sturges regular and always one of the best things in any Sturges movie he was in, but this part is bigger than his usual ones and is surely the best performance in his career. Also, what about Raymond Massey for his brilliant spoof of Boris Karloff in Arsenic & Old Lace? Another great comedy performance unfairly snubbed.

    But the best supporting male performance of the year wasn?t even nominated. I?m talking about Edward G. Robinson in Double Indemnity. How the Academy didn?t even nominate him I don?t know. Only Robinson could sell that character, but he?s riveting to watch. ?Closer than that, Walter; closer than that.?

    Robinson.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Ethel Barrymore ? None But the Lone
  25. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 7
    CEREMONY YEAR: 1934

    BEST PICTURE

    42nd Street
    A Farewell to Arms
    Cavalcade ? WINNER
    I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang
    Lady for a Day
    Little Women
    The Private Life of Henry VIII
    She Done Him Wrong
    Smilin? Through
    State Fair

    This version of Farewell to Arms is pretty bad, if you ask me. So is She Done Him Wrong, which is a Mae West vehicle that Cary Grant later stated was his worst movie (yes, Nevermind, Grant likes this one even less than Arsenic & Old Lace, which he also hates) and I think he?s not far from wrong there.

    Of these, the clear winner is I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang, which is a gripping, bleak picture of a man?s life being destroyed; it feels a few decades ahead of its time. It?s a great flick.

    The major snub here is King Kong, which is a masterpiece (though I?d still give the win to Chain Gang), but I?d also love to have seen Gold Diggers of 1933 nominated. It?s a pitch perfect pre-Code musical that?s unjustly forgotten.


    BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Leslie Howard ? Berkeley Square
    Charles Laughton ? The Private Life of Henry VIII ? WINNER
    Paul Muni ? I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang

    Muni, a vastly underrated actor, is magnificent in Chain Gang.

    BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Katharine Hepburn ? Morning Glory ? WINNER
    May Robson ? Lady for a Day
    Diana Wynyard ? Cavalcade

    Would it kill you if I said Fay Wray deserved a nom for King Kong? All jokes aside, she?s game for anything, spends half the movie acting to something that isn?t there and those screams are absolutely iconic.

    NO SUPPORTING AWARDS WERE GIVEN FOR PERFORMANCES THIS YEAR

    It?s too bad no supporting awards. I?d have nominated Aline MacMahon for her role in Gold Diggers of 1933; she?s the sardonic, witty heart of the movie. Then there?s the marvelous Guy Kibbee. Or what about Warren William as the straight-laced older brother to Dick Powell, who finds himself seductively drawn into the comedic revels? And what about Charley Chase in Laurel & Hardy?s Sons of the Desert? It?s hard to believe anyone could steal a movie from Laurel & Hardy, but Chase?s manic, alcohol fueled performance is riotously funny and brilliant.

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Frank Capra ? Lady for a Day
    George Cukor ? Little Women
    Frank Lloyd ? Cavalcade ? WINNER

    James Whale deserved a nomination for The Invisible Man. And how King Kong didn?t get a nod here, I don?t know; if you love nothing else in the movie (and I love it entire), you still have to give it up for that masterful, breakneck direction.

    NO MUSICAL AWARDS WERE GIVEN THIS YEAR

    OTHER FILMS OF NOTE

    Baby Face
    Bed of Roses
    The Bitter Tea of General Yen
    Bombshell
    The Bowery
    Christopher Strong
    Counsellor at Law
    Dancing Lady
    Design for Living
    Dinner at Eight
    Doctor Bull
    Duck Soup
    The Eagle & the Hawk
    Ekstase (Ecstasy)
    Elmer, the Great
    The Emperor Jones
    Female
    Footlight Parade
    The Fatal Glass of Beer
    Going Hollywood
    Gold Diggers of 1933
    Hallelujah I?m a Bum
    His Double Life
    Hold Your Man
    Las Hurdes (Land Without Bread)
    I?m No Angel
    Industrial Britain
    International House
    The Invisible Man
    Island of Lost Souls
    The Kennel Murder Case
    King Kong
    The Kiss Before the Mirror
    Lady Killer
    Liebelei
    The Little Giant
    Man?s Castle
    Mr. Skitch
    The Mummy
    The Mystery of the Wax Museum
    One Sunday Afternoon
    Penthouse
    Picture Snatcher
    Queen Christina
    Rasputin & the Empress
    Roman Scandals
    The Sin of Nora Moran
    Snow-White
    The Son of Kong
    Sons of the Desert
    The Story of Temple Drake
    Das Testament des Dr. Mabuse (The Testament of Dr. Mabuse)
    Three Little Pigs
    Topaze
    Tugboat Annie
    The Vampire Bat
    What-No Beer?
    The White Sister
    Zero de Conduite: Jeunes Diables au College (Zero for Conduct)