Amph Hollywood Death Watch

Discussion in 'Community' started by Zaz, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. Benny_Blanco Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 21, 2002
    star 4
    The loss of a great talent...who knows what he would have went on to after Spartacus? He certainly made the role his own.

    An even bigger loss to his family, my thoughts go out to them.
  2. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5


    Whitfield was only 39 years old? And the irony, he was famous for looking so incredibly fit and healthy. I guess when it's your time to go...

    He could have had a lengthy career. And by all accounts, very well-liked by all of his co-workers.
  3. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
  4. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5
    Calley was a much beloved executive in a town where most executives are regarded the incarnation of evil.

    He produced some successful films outside of his executive stints, including The Da Vinci Code and the Birdcage.

    It was Calley, as the head of Warner Brothers in the early 70s, who essentially gave Clint Eastwood and Stanley Kubrick lifetime contracts with that studio, along with endless artistic and financial support.
  5. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    John Wesley Downey pm'd me re Steve Jobs, and I think he has a point:

    "After I watched this news video about Steve Jobs, I thought you might want to consider a death watch notice for him.

    People in the forum will certainly have a lot to say about him. Yes, I know he wasn't a creator or a performer of entertainment,
    but when it looked as though music piracy was going destroy to music on the net, he came up with i-tunes which has had a huge
    impact and changed how people bought music - legally. And of course his purchase of Pixar from George Lucas and it's subsequent success has had a big impact on people who have enjoyed those movies. Just food for thought. I didn't know Jobs sat on the Board of Directors of Walt Disney Corporation, but when they bought Pixar, that was part of the deal."

    Well said.

  6. The2ndQuest Tri-Mod With a Mouth

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2000
    star 10
    Yeah, there's few, if any, people who could have achieved what he did with iTunes and the iPod. Others had tried (I think, notably, Sony) but no one had a foot in both the electronics industry AND the entertainment industry (in a neutral standing) with enough weight to form that common platform-one that is really a precursor to a lot of the video streaming/purchase services and the main reason Digital Copies are included with most DVD/BD releases today.

    And though he wasn't directly involved with the creation of their movies (at least not in as significant a role as Lasseter), he was still the heart of the company, allowing them to push the technology to achieve what they did and become the most successful production company ever.

    And, of course, his devices and programs keep becoming new platforms for film and TV to be presented/transmitted on.


    Seems he knew this was coming, though. He was always very private and secretive about his personal life, but allowed someone to start writing an authorized biography of him a few months ago.

    Certainly puts his resignation into a new perspective as well- it literally took death to make him stop working.


    [image=http://cache.gawker.com/assets/images/comment//2011/10/03a116f771ea60014f6c3a77a65effc7/original.jpg]

    Some good links on Jobs:

    Gizmodo's Think Different tribute video

    Reactions to Steve's death
    (Twitter's CEO had a great statement: "Once in a rare while, somebody comes along who doesnt just raise the bar, they create an entirely new standard of measurement.".)

    Steve Jobs: How to live before you die Stanford commencement address

    Apple also now has an e-mail address set up for people to send their thoughts, memories and condolences to: rememberingsteve@apple.com
  7. Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Mar 19, 1999
    star 7
    It is mindboggling that the same man who made a movie like The Incredibles possible also figured out how to create a marketplace, and market, for disposable software applications sold for a few dollars a pop.

    The first computer I owned was a Macintosh SE 30 with dual floppy drives. One drive for applications, the other for storing documents. It came with an application called Hypercard that now seems like a magical precursor to the internet. A friend of mine who was a programmer was involved in a startup company that let people network their Hypercard stacks through dialup modems. Naturally, it went under, but those were the days.
  8. The2ndQuest Tri-Mod With a Mouth

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2000
    star 10
    Ah, HyperStudio... those were the days.
  9. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 2000
    star 8
    You know, I'm not an Apple guy at all. I think I've never been in an Apple store and I don't own either an iPod or an iPad. But even for me, hearing this new was monumental.

    When it comes to someone who had become more than a legend . . . he was an icon; probably the biggest icon that I'll co-exist with.
  10. Raven Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 5, 1998
    star 6

    Normally, I look at obituaries and public outpourings of grief and I find that there's a tendency to overstate importance the person's contributions. With Steve Jobs, I think that I see more understatement. Not just from the more devout users of competing platforms, but even from people who acknowledge what he did.

    He's on the same tier as Henry Ford, Thomas Edison and John Rockefeller.

    He wasn't an innovator or inventor himself. But damn, he choose the right innovators and inventors to back more often than not. Always making something easier to use, making it more stylish, making it smaller, making it more convenient, giving it better battery life, etc. Apple under Steve Jobs found ways to be the best at given segments of markets, forcing everyone else to play catch-up. He was also a damn good CEO; when he first came back to Apple, I remember people talking about how it wouldn't change anything, and how Apple was basically doomed as a company. People were talking about Microsoft buying it, or Dell, or Sony, etc. If you could go back in time to tell people that in under two decades, Steve Jobs would turn Apple into the most valuable company on the planet, people would have thought that you were crazy.
  11. DarthBoba Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 29, 2000
    star 9
    Truly an incredible man; I've owned nothing but Macs (two laptops and an Imac) for three years now. They're great products, and so is my Iphone and Ipod.

    Apple and Steve Jobs came back onto the electronics market with a combination of stylistic sense and fierce intolerance of "good enough" that still isn't really equalled; they're starting to reach the limits (IMO) of what OSX can do with the current software release, but even the relatively imperfect Lion has (albeit adopted from the Iphone) very interesting and useful ideas, specifically Launchpad and Mission Control (which exists in a rather primitive sense with the Multitasking bar on the Iphone.) The first release has had a fair share of strange errors for me, but it functions and will only get better. This is in sharp contrast with probably the worst Windows release of recent years, Vista, which was terrible to begin with and never got much better.

    I'm not sure if the heavy automation pointed towards simplicity of use was specifically Steve's idea on the Mac and Iphone platforms, but just the level of stuff it simply does for you is a strong point in it's favor, IMO; the typical computer user doesn't think tinkering with system settings is fun. Which brings us to the most important device Apple has introduced lately: The Ipad. I personally have about zero use for one (I'm one of the people who LIKES tinkering with their electronics, and the Ipad doesn't let you really do that), but Jobs was entirely correct in making it as simple as possible. Most people don't power-use, or even play 'real' video games, on their home computers; computers are predominantly consumption devices, and the combination of fairly serious hardware, a good, tested operating system, and a relatively hazard-free approach to programs and games obviously appeals to alot of people. This obviously isn't exclusive to the Ipad..but I'd say it's probably the best of the current group of tablets from a consumption perspective; Itunes & the App Store really don't have serious competition, and won't for at least awhile unless Amazon seriously picks up it's game.

    Finally- Steve was one of a very few innovative important people left to us; his passing is a loss to us all, and I only hope Apple carries on the way he would want them to.
  12. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5


    There are still some cynical people who believe one person can't make a difference. That's nonsense.
    Steve Jobs proved that one person can make all the difference in the world.
  13. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
  14. Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Mar 19, 1999
    star 7
    Napier's screen death in Silence of the Lambs is one for the ages.
  15. CloneUncleOwen Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 30, 2009
    star 4
    [image=http://trialx.com/curetalk/wp-content/blogs.dir/7/files/2011/04/gcelebrities/Charles_Napier-3.jpg]

    Stiff man putting my mind in jail
    And the judge banged the gavel and said "No Bail"
    Gonna lick his hand and waaaaaaaag my tail


    (from Charles Napier's greatest hits)


    RIP, Charles... you will be missed.@};-

  16. Champion of the Force Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 27, 1999
    star 4
    George Baker (1931-2011)

    Film career that spanned 60 years, from roles in films such as The Dam Busters, The Spy Who Loved Me and The 39 Steps, plus also notably TV series including The Prisoner, Minder and arguably his most well-known role: Inspector Wexford in The Ruth Rendell Mysteries. He also played Tiberius in I, Claudius.

    (interestingly, the article also states he was strongly considered by Ian Fleming as being the ideal James Bond but he couldn't accept due to his pre-existing contract)
  17. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    I only remember him in "I, Claudius"; where it appears that he was cast against type, because he was great as Tiberius, the man with *no* charisma.
  18. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
  19. JohnWesleyDowney Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2004
    star 5
    The only movie I ever liked of his was Tommy, and I'm not sure if it was because of him or my young
    love affair with the source material, though Russell's flamboyant style did make a contribution.

    Some of his films, like the Devils, are virtually unwatchable. At least for me.

    A real iconoclast. You definitely know a Ken Russell film when you see it.

    Ann Margret talks about working with Ken Russell
  20. CloneUncleOwen Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 30, 2009
    star 4
    [image=http://s3.broadway.com/article-photos/large/1.157634.jpg]

    Controversial... brilliant... gone.
  21. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
  22. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    He was a funny guy, and went too soon.
  23. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Nov 4, 1998
    star 7
    Harry Morgan dies aged 96. He was mostly known for his role as Colonel Sherman Potter in MASH, and that's certainly the role I would recognize him in.
  24. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 14, 2001
    star 6
    It's a Wonderful Life.
  25. Django211 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 6, 1999
    star 4
    I saw "The Big Clock" not too long ago & was surprised to see Harry Morgan as a villain. He played a lackey and was surprisingly menacing, in no time I forgot of him as Col. Potter.