Home school v. Private school v. Public school

Discussion in 'Archive: The Senate Floor' started by solojones, Aug 3, 2002.

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  1. Rebecca191 Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 1999
    star 6
    I got exposed to learning with many different people, and to tell you the truth, I don't think I got anything out of it. I got more out of my out-of-school interactions. And by the way, I've matured more, and learned to deal with people better, and become less overly sensitive, all since I started homeschooling. And how is that? Because I didn't have the pressure anymore.
  2. Lieutenant Tschel Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 7, 1999
    star 2
    Well just as the example I gave in my last post doesn't make the same true for all homeschooled children, neither does your experience. And as several others who have posted in this thread have voiced similar concerns to my own, it would seem that my example is more prevalent than yours.

    Once again, I attribute this not to the system but to those who choose to implement it. As I believe I stated previously, the type of parents who want to shield their children from every little thing are types who are more than likely going to think that homeschooling is a great idea.
  3. Rebecca191 Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 1999
    star 6
    My parents haven't tried to shield me from the world. I begged to be homeschooled and they finally got fed up with public school and agreed. They did look into private school at one point, but they couldn't find one that was close enough to where we lived.

    Edit: Oh, and I don't know anyone else who is homeschooled, so I can't really say how it would work out. But all I can say is... I wish I had been homeschooled my whole life, I had such a horrible time in school. NO ONE should have to experience the misery I experience in school. :( And I wouldn't have been shielded from the world, my parents aren't like that.
  4. solojones Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 27, 2000
    star 9
    Rebeca- obviously your situation is different than most homeschoolers. But I do know a ton of homeschoolers, and generally they are sheltered and socialy inept.

    -sj loves kevin spacey
  5. Rebecca191 Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 1999
    star 6
    Maybe it's their parents, who chose the wrong reasons to homeschool?
  6. FlamingSword Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 4, 2001
    star 6
    Lieutenant Tschel: Once again, I attribute this not to the system but to those who choose to implement it. As I believe I stated previously, the type of parents who want to shield their children from every little thing are types who are more than likely going to think that homeschooling is a great idea.

    I agree somewhat with you. There are indeed man homeschooling parents who want to shield their children. This is true espcially of the earlier homeschoolers.

    However, the homeschool movement is increasing in popularity and is becoming more mainstream. It is not only the "fringe" parents who are going to homeschool, but mainstream, normal people. Therefore, I think that the problem you described is diminishing greatly among homeschoolers.

    When my parents first decided to homeschool me in 1990, homeschooling was harder than it is now. It was frowned upon and mainstream organization offered little support. You couldn't attend any classes at private or public schools, weren't offered the same services as other schoolchildren at libraries, Park Districts, and other places. It wasn't extreme, but it was enough to be noticeable. Perhaps it is because the general public tended to "shun" homeschoolers that homeschoolers "shunned" the general public.

    The idea of homeschooling has radically changed. Now people are interested and open to the idea. You can attend sports activities at private and public schools without going to school there. There are procedures in place to deal with homeschoolers who take the ACT, SAT, or want to attend college. It's easier now than it was 10 years ago.

    Of course this might have something to do with my perception as well. An 11-year-old wants to fit in and not be looked down on for her school status. A 21-year-old doesn't care what people think about where I attended school, or at least I don't, not anymore. :)
  7. solojones Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 27, 2000
    star 9
    What about parents grading your stuff? I mean, yes, they'll try to be objective, but what if not all of them are? How are colleges to know if your grades are credible?

    -sj loves kevin spacey
  8. Lieutenant Tschel Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 7, 1999
    star 2
    Thanks FlamingSword, I have noticed an increased amount of people talking about the possibility of choosing homeschooling as an option than in previous years, so I'd say it's moving into a position of being an entirely acceptable method of education.

    Keep in mind that everything I say is based on my experience with the current status of the system, and as of now I have only seen one example (that being Rebecca191) of a favorable product.
  9. Rebecca191 Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 1999
    star 6
    My parents don't grade my stuff.

    It's sent off to a correspondance school to be graded.
  10. Lieutenant Tschel Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 7, 1999
    star 2
    "How are colleges to know if your grades are credible?"

    Not sure what the proper procedure is, but if Solo has a point than this would be as potent an argument as any for the necessity of standardized test scores being part of the college admissions process.
  11. Rebecca191 Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 1999
    star 6
    Standardized test scores are part of the college admissions process.

    I took the SATs and two SAT IIs.

    That's what I'll have to get into college on, but I got good enough scores for the type of school I'm interested in, which is one close to home. I want to commute, not live in a dorm.... half because of my sister's college dorm horror stories, and half because I'm waaaay to lazy to do my own laundry, and stuff like that.
  12. FlamingSword Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 4, 2001
    star 6
    Lieutenant Tschel, what!? I'm not a favorable product :p

    I too had a correspondence school for all my grades. They were an accredited school so I got an official high school diploma and didn't even enter college technically as a homeschooler.

    Shortly after I graduated my mom decided to quit the correspondence school for my siblings. But since they want to get into college, she makes sure she covers everything they would need and more to get into the college they want.

    Rebecca191, which correspondence school do you use? I used one based close to home in Arlington Heights, IL but I know they're international :)
  13. Lieutenant Tschel Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 7, 1999
    star 2
    I'm referring to a large movement that wants to get rid of the tests, especially the ACT and SAT I. It's a big issue in the University of California system.

    ADD-ON:
    "what!? I'm not a favorable product?!?"

    LOL! Sorry! In my haste I neglected to read (or completely digest,more likely) that you too were homeschooled. Sure you count..
  14. Rebecca191 Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 1999
    star 6
    I use Keystone National High School in Pennsylvania. It's also accredited.

    Edit: I don't think they should get rid of the SATs. But I don't agree with the changes they are making to the tests.
  15. solojones Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 27, 2000
    star 9
    Standardized tests are important, but it's also important that colleges know you are a hard worker not just a good test taker.

    -sj loves kevin spacey
  16. Lieutenant Tschel Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 7, 1999
    star 2
    Right. Just as it shouldn't be solely based on high school grades and extracurricular activities, it shouldn't be based solely on test scores either. Using the two to gain an overview of the student was the accepted system for quite a while until just recently. If you ask me it sounds a lot like some kind of fiendish plot ot bring back Affirmative Action without bringing back Affirmative Action.
  17. StarBlazer Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 2, 2001
    star 4
    I'm just going to add my 2 cents here. I've gone to public schools for my entire education, and I personally enjoy it. No, I'm not Miss Social, and never will be, but I enjoy the atmosphere of public schools. Granted, I attend the best school district in the state, but my school happens to be the 'runt' of the district. It is also the most diverse. I enjoy the many opportunities presented to me to meet new and decidedly different kids. Yes, kids can be cruel, disruptive, etc, but if you're exposed to that early on, you'll be more adept to deal with it later on in life. Most of the teachers I've had relate fairly well to students, and make learning productive as well as fun.

    I'm fairly certain my test scores would be the same regardless of my choice of schooling. IMO, public schools make my life a whole lot more interesting. I wouldn't say the education at private schools/homeschooling is better, it really depends on the person. Yes, my school does average on standardized tests, but many of those tests count the scores of the special ed children, transfers, etc. I (and many other people at my school) still manage to do exceptionally well on these tests.

    Saying that, I would rather attend a public school that makes learning more enjoyable for me than to be homeschooled/private schooled, where the kids are less...varied?

    Just my opinion, the situation is different for everyone. :)


    *SB*
  18. JediStryker Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 5, 2000
    star 4
    Rebeca- obviously your situation is different than most homeschoolers. But I do know a ton of homeschoolers, and generally they are sheltered and socialy inept.

    How is it that you seem to know most of the homeschoolers in the country? [face_plain]

    I knew lots of homeschoolers, and none of them are the way you are claiming the ones you know are. It almost makes me wonder if you are stereotyping based on what other say about homeschoolers.

    What about parents grading your stuff? I mean, yes, they'll try to be objective, but what if not all of them are? How are colleges to know if your grades are credible?

    Most parents who homeschool their kids and grade their kids papers understand that it is a huge responsibility, and know they would not be doing their kids any favors by fixing their grades.

    The college my sister is going to apparently required a review of the work she did over her high school years, and they had some tests for her to take. Granted, it's a Christian college and is very open to homeschoolers, but as homeschooling becomes more prevalent in the US, so are more colleges becoming open to homeschoolers.
  19. DilatedPeoples Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jul 20, 2002
    Under NO CIRCUMSTANCES would I allow my child to be homeschooled.


    Learning is not only about books, but learning about life, aka, frikkin coexisting with people, making friends, interacting in a social environment. Home schooling sickens me because it robs kids of this, and parents do it just to shape the views of their youngsters. It may be well-intended, but its a terrible idea.

    The kid's I know who have been homeschooled have been quieter, not as able to adapt, less ability to anaylze and react to people.

    In the end, its not about the education, its about living life.
  20. JediStryker Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 5, 2000
    star 4
    This is probably because democrats have no problem with taking more money from those who work hard.

    <sigh> Well, public school sure has made you all more open minded. [face_plain]

    Only people who a) don't understand homeschooling or b) are basing their opinions off of one two people can say things like this.
  21. solojones Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 27, 2000
    star 9
    Stryker, I'm not sure who that was directed at but I don't see how it's relevant to the conversation, or even where it came from.

    Anyway... I am not basing my opinions on what anyone else has said. I personally know over a dozen kids who are homeschooled, and almost all are socially inept. Granted, not all of them, but the majority. They don't know how to be polite and accepting of other people most the time.

    A girl showed me and my homeschooled friend a picture of a guy she thought was cute, and even though I didn't really think so I just smiled and nodded. My friend who's always been homeschooled just goes, "No, he's fat. He's ugly." I love her as a friend and all, but she's certainly got some problems that stem from not having to constantly be with and learn with kids of all backgrounds and abilities, etc.

    -sj loves kevin spacey
  22. FlamingSword Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 4, 2001
    star 6
    DilatedPeoples, perhaps you've known your share of homeschoolers, perhaps not. But I know I have. Although you may never consider it an option for your kids, I would look into it more if I were you.

    Learning is not only about books, but learning about life, aka, frikkin coexisting with people, making friends, interacting in a social environment.

    And this doesn't happen if you're homechooled? True, it doesn't happen as much in school but there are plenty of opportunities. Unless the kids parents decide to hide them in a tower, social interaction does not have to be lacking in the least bit. I had more a variety of friends during my homeschool than when I went to school. Now perhaps it was because my school wasn't so varied, but being exposed to many different people in many different organizations of many different ages and beliefs, had its advantages.


    StarBlazer: I wouldn't say the education at private schools/homeschooling is better, it really depends on the person.

    A point I completely agree with. Schooling needs are unique based on the child, the parents, the environmental situation (how good are the schools), and the financial situation (what can you afford).
  23. DarthLothi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 4, 2001
    star 4
    I'm going to throw my $.02 in here.

    The quality of public schools varies wildly from place to place, with big differences sometimes even within the same county. Suburban public schools, where parents are well-off and highly involved, produce much better results than the inner-city schools, where poverty and other social factors take a heavier toll.

    I myself am a product of 12 years of Catholic education, and IMHO, Catholic schools are hard to beat. Sure, there are compulsory religion classes, but if you choose to go there, you know that up front. And the education that I received, with a few exceptions, was well-rounded, rigorous, and remarkably free of religious bias.

    But that's not to say that I think private schools are better. Not all private schools are the elite "academies" and "country-day" schools that many people think of when private schools are mentioned. In my area of the country, many private schools are religious-based and filled with students whose parents don't want them exposed to any other views of the world. The quality of education in these schools is subpar, with many fundamentals skipped in deference to the beliefs of whatever church runs the school.

  24. Rebecca191 Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 2, 1999
    star 6
    You know, I truly hope I won't have to homeschool the children I hope to have someday. I hope I will be able to send them to public school, or find a good secular private school (I would never send my children to a religious school). I would use homeschooling as a last resort. Which is what my parents used it for, for me. There just was no other option.
  25. Lieutenant Tschel Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 7, 1999
    star 2
    Religious schools can vary just as much as any other kind. For example, the Catholic school I went to, while it did have mandatory religion classes and Mass attendance for those special days (No, we didn't go every week or anything), tried to make it as easy as possible for non-Catholics attending. Involvement in real hardliner religious activities such as retreats was completely optional, and even the classes were aimed at including the angle of other faiths and the truths they possess. Roughly a third of the student body was non-Catholic, and everyone got along fine belief-wise. Aside from non-Catholic Christians, we also had Buddhists, Hindus, Muslims, and Jews.

    The rest of the classes were conducted almost entirely religion-free, we learned about evolution in Biology (Which isn't even a problem in Catholic teaching, but you know how some people are...).

    Heck, the religion classes weren't even what you'd expect as far as raising Catholicism over other religions. In my Church History classes we spent substantial amounts of time examining the decadence and abuses of the Church in the Middle Ages and Renaissance and examined the ideas of the likes of Martin Luther and John Calvin. Most enjoyable were moderated class discussions on topics such as the Crusades, the Reformation, and Vatican II.

    Then again, we have a Christian Fundamentalist (not sure what denomination they're supposed to be) school in town as well that teaches stunted science, absolute inferiority of other religions, the works.

    Personally, I wouldn't be so quick to write off religious, specifically Catholic, schools as havens of religious fanaticism because that's nearly always been far from the case in my experience.
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