Senate Homosexuality: the Thread

Discussion in 'Community' started by zombie, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Lord Vivec Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 17, 2006
    star 7
    Yes, conservatives are the ones who are bullied, not gay men and women. It's conservatives who get brutally attacked, beaten, set on fire, for being conservatives. Not gay men and women. Liberals are spouting from the pulpit that conservatives' very existence is a danger to moral society, right? It's not conservatives saying that about gays. People have to keep quiet about their conservativism, not their homosexuality. That is why you have closet conservatives walking around and not closet homosexuals.

    ...


    What kind of ridiculous fantasy world do you live in where calling a pastor who thinks gays should be executed a homophobe is on par with or worse than what conservatives say and do to gays?
    Last edited by Lord Vivec, Mar 25, 2013
  2. wannasee Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 24, 2007
    star 4
    You know I didn't say that...
    Last edited by wannasee, Mar 25, 2013
  3. Jedi Merkurian Episode VII Thread-Reaper

    Manager
    Member Since:
    May 25, 2000
    star 6
    Didn't say what, that conservatives get bullied? Cuz you kinda did...
  4. wannasee Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 24, 2007
    star 4
    they get bullied in discourse. Remember the context.
  5. anakinfansince1983 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2011
    star 7
    LOL at the idea that we're supposed to feel sorry for the poor conservatives getting "bullied in discourse" given the context of what Vivec described.

    I'm sure all conservatives don't condone the systematic execution of homosexuals, however, it is the conservative idea that homophobia is somehow acceptable or even to be encouraged, that leads to such sentiments.

    In North Carolina, opposition to anti-bullying bills in school was based around the idea that such bills make gay people "special" and it might keep the religious people from doing their godly duty of telling gay kids that they're going to hell.
    Last edited by anakinfansince1983, Mar 25, 2013
  6. Ghost Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 13, 2003
    star 6
    anakinfansince1983 likes this.
  7. Juliet316 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
    Funny you should mention Roberts, KW. It seems as though his cousin has a vested interest in how the Court decides all of this.

    I can just hear some conservatives calling for Roberts to recuse himself fromt his because of the cousin (and thus allow Scalia to bully the court into upholding Prop 8 and DOMA). Especially since some are probably still bitter at Roberts for being the swing vote that upheld Obamacare.

    Edit: I heard about McCaskill, had not heard about Warner yet. Times really are a changing.
    Last edited by Juliet316, Mar 25, 2013
  8. shinjo_jedi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 21, 2002
    star 5
    Poor Rush Limbaugh. People need to stop being mean to him.

    Poor Catholic priest who is getting bullied for giving a sermon on how gay relationships are threatening to destroy society and inhibiting on his 'religious freedom.'

    Poor Rick Santorum; people are mean to him for saying nice things like gay relationships are similar to beastiality.
  9. shinjo_jedi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 21, 2002
    star 5
    March 2013 will be remembered as a tidal wave in history to where it went to the majority opinion and politically viable (and necessary for one party) as well as seeing many public officials shift their opinion. Warner, McCaskill, Portman, Rockefeller, Bill & Hillary have all come out publicly for it just this month, as well as the Republican video series of prominent conservatives supporting it.
    Last edited by shinjo_jedi, Mar 25, 2013
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  10. Juliet316 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
    All the while, the Catholic church turns a blind eye to child rapists in their own clergy.
  11. Obi-Zahn Kenobi Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 23, 1999
    star 7
    If that's a dig at what happened in the 60's, 70's, and 80's, then whatever. But there were seven credible allegations of minor sexual abuse against all Catholic clergy in 2011 in the US. The Catholic Church is essentially a leader among organizations in preventing minor sexual abuse now.
  12. shinjo_jedi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 21, 2002
    star 5
    Not to derail the thread, but am I supposed to pretend that forgives the decades of cover ups that reached the highest levels of the Vatican including Ratzinger...?

    Let alone their countless offensive remarks and discriminatory treatment towards homosexuals?
    Last edited by shinjo_jedi, Mar 25, 2013
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  13. Souderwan Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 3, 2005
    star 6
    Not to further derail the thread, but unless you're meaing "sexual abuse of minors", I'd love to know what the **** constitutes "minor sexual abuse".
  14. Lowbacca_1977 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 28, 2006
    star 6
    Unless someone wants to make the case that sexual abuse of minors is a relevant point of discussion when discussing homosexuality, lets try to keep this away from just focusing on that facet of the Catholic Church
    Last edited by Lowbacca_1977, Mar 26, 2013
  15. shinjo_jedi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 21, 2002
    star 5
    No matter the outcome of the Supreme Court today, I think today is rather telling in many ways how this issue will ultimately end up. It just depends if the Justices will make it fast and quick or if it'll be a more drawn out process. Anecdotal, yes, but my Facebook is covered in the red equality sign - I count 3 out of 4 posts on my newsfeed of it being shared. Major Democrats (Warner and the DCCC even) have changed their profile pictures to it.

    And yet there is not a word or a tweet out of the Republican Party. Not from (as of this posting) Rubio, Gingrich, Santorum, Romney, Ryan, Cruz, Paul, Bachmann, Palin, the RNC, Priebus, RNSC, Grassley, Boehner or Cantor. Their silence on the issue today is deafening. Shouldn't you stand up for what you believe in?
    Last edited by shinjo_jedi, Mar 26, 2013
  16. GrandAdmiralJello Community and Lit moderator person

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    Member Since:
    Nov 28, 2000
    star 10
    The air is electric today, and it's just the oral argument. It's going to be an interesting next couple of days... I'm going to try to listen to the audio transcripts later tonight. I feel for this one, just reading them is insufficient.
  17. Obi-Zahn Kenobi Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 23, 1999
    star 7
    Not the further this discussion in light of moderation, but merely to clarify, that is precisely what I meant.
    Souderwan and Jedi Merkurian like this.
  18. Juliet316 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
    Boehner came out after Portman issued his support of SSM to essentially say "I respect his views, but I don't support it, personally." As for Bachmann, well we don't really need an official statement from her, as she and her husband are the ones that have that "pray the gay away" camp that Anderson Cooper reported on months ago.
  19. Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Mar 19, 1999
    star 7
    Nate Silver posted today on public support for gay marriage. He says that it remains unclear from the polling whether an outright majority supports it, yet the trendline suggests this is true. Also, public support for gay marriage has increased at a steady pace since 2004.

    If the trendline continues, a full 70% of the American public may be in favor of gay marriage by 2020. I'd bet it levels off before that, but that we'll have a solid enough majority in favor that the Republicans will be forced sooner rather than later to drop opposition to it as a national issue.

    The Supreme Court is likely going to remain a major problem, even though by 2020 there will only be 5 or 6 states left (in the South, of course) where a majority of the population opposes gay marriage.

    I suggest everyone who wants to live in a gay-free, abortion-free zone should move to Mississippi by 2020.
    Last edited by Jabbadabbado, Mar 26, 2013
  20. shinjo_jedi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 21, 2002
    star 5
    I'm referring to their social media announcements today. Obama, Pelosi, Warren, Warner, Bloomberg, Gillibrand, the DNC, the DCCC, etc. have all changed their profile picture or Facebooked/Tweeted to show their support for marriage equality on this historic day. The Republicans are completely silent on their position.
    Last edited by shinjo_jedi, Mar 26, 2013
  21. Juliet316 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
    Kind of not surprised by the radio silence of the GOP/Tea Party. Even if it's being fought at the Supreme Court, I would suspect a lot of the GOP realize which way the wind is blowing on this issue.
  22. Lowbacca_1977 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 28, 2006
    star 6
    Really though, you don't even need to have a total majority for states like Missouri to have to deal with it. All you really need is, if DOMA is for some demented reason upheld, a majority in Congress to remove DOMA. At which point, states would have to recognize same-sex marriages from other states because those are marriages, and that's constitutionally required. The whole house of cards comes down with DOMA, maybe not immediately, but in relatively short order.
  23. Juliet316 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
    If DOMA is upheld, the Democrats would have to retake the House before any action could be taken Legistatively, and that's probably years awway and there's no guarantee by the time that's possible that we won't end up with the possiblity of a President Santorum or Bachmann.
  24. Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Mar 19, 1999
    star 7
    Repeal of DOMA sounds like a great issue for the next presidential election, a winning plank for Hillary Clinton maybe.
  25. Lowbacca_1977 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 28, 2006
    star 6
    I think that's too narrow of a look at it, though. What has to be kept in mind is that very much the view on this is changing. With a population that supports same-sex marriage by 60 or 70%, you are NOT going to have two houses of Congress that are controlled by Republicans that have the solid opposition we see now. They will either adapt as a party, either with what we're seeing from politicians like Portman, or new candidates that are the Republicans we know and love for most issues, but support same-sex marriage. If they try to hold to these values, they simply won't be able to maintain a majority. The Washington Post has a piece that talks about recent polling, and aside from the fact that this isn't just the old view dying out, but people changing views, which accelerates this, there's also that when you break down GOP polling by age, Republicans under the age of 50 still, by a plurality, support same-sex marriage. Give that a few years, and even WITHIN the GOP (and presuming its membership doesn't split off over the issue) the demographics will represent a GOP that supports same-sex marriage, too. When even the younger Republicans favor same-sex marriage as well, I don't see how anyone can hold to the view that we're in some tenuous question of if this will happen or not. We are on an extremely clear trajectory, imo, that we are heading towards same-sex marriage being legal in most, if not all, states in the near future, barring a monumental sort of Great Awakening sort of movement or something, maybe. And even then, I don't think that would manage to gain the traction. It's so far down the path, I really can't see how it would turn around.