Saga Is Anakin Skywalker a Demi-God?

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by DarthPhilosopher, Aug 31, 2011.

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  1. DarthPhilosopher Jedi Grand Master

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    Jan 23, 2011
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    Simple question. Given that Anakin was quite literally 'born of the Force' could he be considered, from a certain point of view, a Demi-God? A God among men?
  2. Lt.Cmdr.Thrawn The Another Saga & CT Manager

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    Absolutely. This is one thing that irks me a bit about the prequels. The OT gave no reason to believe Anakin was anything other than a talented pilot and Force-user. I know the prophecy aspect was on GL's mind since the beginning, but there's something that feels like it clashes with the "future always in motion" model from the OT. Anytime anyone talks about destiny in the OT, they're really talking about their own assumptions, and they're wrong.

    On the other hand, a character who's born into power and has to struggle because they feel they don't measure up could be an interesting protagonist. I didn't get this sense from prequel Anakin, though - the issues he deals with are more personal and rarely have to do with feelings of inferiority stemming from his prophesied position. He feels Obi-Wan is holding him back, or when he's angry at being denied council membership - these things do not relate to his status as "Chosen One." Come to think of it, I'm not sure what making him the "Chosen One" accomplishes - even if a prophecy is a definite part of the story, he could easily just be a Jedi forseen to be a hero. I guess the Chosen One idea forces the scale of the story to be a little larger, involving the structure of the Force itself - which is something else I don't really understand the necessity of.


    Anyway - Anakin Skywalker, demigod? Yeah, probably, if he was actually created by the Force.
  3. DarthPhilosopher Jedi Grand Master

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    Jan 23, 2011
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    I guess the main reason for this is because the Prequels are a traditional Greek Tragedy, and many Greek Heroes (which is the formula used for Anakin) were demi-Gods.

    It is interesting however and gives the Saga a further mythological aspect - the main character is a demi-God. Darth Vader is a demi-God. Fascinating and compelling.
  4. Lt.Cmdr.Thrawn The Another Saga & CT Manager

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    Can't deny that the Chosen One concept adds a mythic aspect, but even so it seems unnecessary to me, as somebody who knew the story as mostly one of personal growth with a few elements from mythical story structure and settings.
  5. Bens_Dad Jedi Youngling

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    Sep 26, 2010
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    Well, I don't know that many "chosen ones" personally lol.

    The issue with Anakin is that he was one person (Palpatine) telling him that he can achieve anything and will be stronger than any Jedi, all because he is the chosen one, and the Jedi themselves acting as though he's just a regular Joe - which is surely a deliberate tactic to avoid problems with ego (too late, because Palpatine got their first). So, there's no right or wrong way for a chosen one to behave; Anakin's problems with personal issues don't make him any less the chosen one. Indeed, without those personal issues (ie falling in love and becoming a father despite the edicts of his order) he would never have ended up bringing balance to The Force (which is the sole nature of the chosen one).
  6. CT-867-5309 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jan 5, 2011
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    No, he's not a demi-god.

    Except for a couple of lines from Qui-Gon (I know it's mentioned by others), the Chosen One stuff is not even part of the saga. It seems more like an out of universe idea thrown in by George than anything integral to the story.

    If the prequels were supposed to be a Greek tragedy, they were anything but traditional.
  7. Bens_Dad Jedi Youngling

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    Sep 26, 2010
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    You say that, and that's your right obviously. But for me it adds weight to the story and allows the OT to be seen in an even greater light.

    I'm not well versed in Greek tragedy so I can't really argue too much about that point.
  8. DarthPhilosopher Jedi Grand Master

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    Jan 23, 2011
    star 4
    How could it be 'out-of-universe'. Its an important part of the story. It's meant to be the overarching plot-point of Anakin's story.

    What do you mean? They are incredibly traditional. What Aristotle outlines in Poetics about the formula for 'Tragedy' is essentially the blue-print for the Prequels. They are incredibly traditional, at least to the same extent as the OT.


    By the way, do you know the artwork your new icon is from CT? Looks really cool.
  9. Lt.Cmdr.Thrawn The Another Saga & CT Manager

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    How is the Chosen One aspect important to the story? I'm not trying to be obtuse, I've just been thinking about this and I don't understand why Anakin had to be a demigod, from a purely storytelling point of view. If it has to do with the prequels-as-Greek-tragedy... why choose that form to model them after over any other form?

    Also, as to the icon you mentioned: I think it's an image of Jorus C'Baoth from a Japanese book cover, possibly from Outbound Flight.
  10. DarthPhilosopher Jedi Grand Master

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    Well of course it isn't an integral aspect of the story - but then again that's the plot point Lucas chose. It's the same as Yoda didn't have to be on the Jedi Council and the Jedi didn't have to have a Jedi Temple on Coruscant. It's just an aspect of the story which was created with the Prequels. Regarding Greek-tragedy - again, its the form of narrative Lucas chose likely because of the whole 'fall of Anakin Skywalker', and as such he might have wanted a more meaningful story in regards to restoring a wider 'balance/peace' to the Force rather than just destroying the Empire.

    Thanks.
  11. Amdrag Jedi Grand Master

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    Aug 26, 2008
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    How is it? It is not mentioned once in the OT where Luke is clearly the protagonist who brings the Sith down.
  12. DarthPhilosopher Jedi Grand Master

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    Notice Anakin's story. Its a part of the plot added to the Saga with the Prequels. The Prequels established it as the overarching aspect of the Saga and the Tragedy of Anakin Skywalker. As such, if the Prequels are part of the Saga, it is an important aspect of the story.
  13. Amdrag Jedi Grand Master

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    Aug 26, 2008
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    The problem is, it is contained to one portion of the "saga" while Anakin's story continue far beyond that portion. It isn't like the prophecy became irrelevant after ROTS, and yet it existence is never acknowledged in the final three films. Yoda and Obi-Wan are both around to speak on the matter.

    You would think bringing balance to the force would be a pretty big deal.
  14. Bens_Dad Jedi Youngling

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    Sep 26, 2010
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    Um, it's Vader who quite literally brings the Sith down. Luke is only the facilitator. And that was clear even before the PT.
  15. DarthPhilosopher Jedi Grand Master

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    a) It's a consistency error then. We know that it's the overarching plot point. It is established in the Prequels that Anakin is destined to bring balance to the Force by destroying the Sith. He destroys the Sith in ROTJ. Thus the prophecy is still relevant if not mentioned.

    b) Why would it be mentioned, or more importantly in which scene?
  16. Amdrag Jedi Grand Master

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    It is debatable. Heck they are all on a battle station that is blown to pieces minutes later. Then it would of been Lando who brought balance. :D

    But it is Luke who turns from the darkside, Luke who shifts the tide. Once he drops his saber, the battle is won. If he strikes his father down, the Emperor wins. It is Luke sacrifices himself, and in turn Anakin does the same.
  17. Bens_Dad Jedi Youngling

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    Well, yes it is debatable, and it's a debate I willingly enter lol.

    Lando? He destroys the Death Star. Entirely incidental to what we're talking about here.

    The act of sacrifice is Vader's alone. If he didn't act, Luke would have died. It is this act that brings balance to The Force, an act of love and compassion. Luke is the facilitator, not the instigator.
  18. Amdrag Jedi Grand Master

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    The consistency error comes with the prequels. It plays as something cliched and tagged on, that disappears once the "originals" get going.

    Obi-Wan and Luke's talk in ROTJ would of been a fine place, which would of led to Luke using it in his pleas for his father to turn from the Emperor. Heck, Anakin trying to turn Luke in ESB could explain how he brought "balance" through destroying the Jedi. After all it is his own destiny.
  19. DarthPhilosopher Jedi Grand Master

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    Jan 23, 2011
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    It's settled then. It's a consistency error. However if one is to believe it as one Saga it must be considered a consistency error in the Saga, not just the Prequels. Ultimately however it is intended to be an integral plot point even if not mentioned. Even if it is just 'tagged on' it is implied at the end of ROTJ.



    Anyway this is besides the topic... was Anakin a Demi-God?
  20. Amdrag Jedi Grand Master

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    Aug 26, 2008
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    Lando destroys the Death Star. You mean the battle station in which the whole confrontation takes place? :)

    Luke doesn't sacrifice? That is kind of ridiculous. As you point out, Luke would of died. But why? Because he spares his father. Because he throws down his weapon and risk his life. He puts his own life on the line as opposed to becoming what his father and the Emperor are. Would of been quite easy to cut his dad's head off and take his place.

    Balance is not brought by death, but by peace. It is Luke that finds that peace. His daddy follows.
  21. DarthPhilosopher Jedi Grand Master

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    Luke sacrifices, but he does not 'bring balance to the Force'. He serves as the catalyst for Anakin's destiny. Anakin destroys the Sith.
  22. Amdrag Jedi Grand Master

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    I wouldn't say Anakin is a demi-God. He is far from the most impressive force user in the six films and never comes off like a force of nature. Yoda and Sidious are as close as we get. Not Anakin. He is just a really powerful wizard with the best armor in the galaxy.
  23. Amdrag Jedi Grand Master

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    Balance is restored once the Jedi return. The Jedi return once Luke spares his father.

    "I'll never turn to the Dark Side. You've failed your highness. I am a Jedi, like my father before me."
  24. DarthPhilosopher Jedi Grand Master

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    Well firstly, given the information we know, he was 'born of the Force', thus meaning that he could be defined as being half 'God' and half 'man'. This, in itself, could qualify him as a Demi-God.

    In regards to his ability - we know that he doesn't reach his full potential. Likewise we know that his power has the ability to surpass all other beings in the galaxy. I would say he would be capable of battling Yoda or the Emperor and would only remain 'equal' because of the Jedi dogma which would seemingly prevent his potential power. In my opinion it is implied in the films that he has the potential to be the most powerful being in the galaxy only that his abilities are destroyed at the end of ROTS.

    You could even say that the mechanical armor is even more symbolic - representing the mechanical replacement of his 'divine/God' half.

    No, balance is restored when the Sith are destroyed. That much is clear.
  25. Amdrag Jedi Grand Master

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    Aug 26, 2008
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    If Yoda's teachings are to be believed, all are "born of the Force". Even the rocks, trees and ships.

    If anything, Anakin wouldn't be a demi-god. It isn't like some God came down and shagged his mother, thus resulting in the status of "half-human". Jesus is the obvious parallel and he isn't a demi-god, he is God. Anakin would be "The Force" rather then half anything. His mother only a vessel.

    When has destruction ever been the solution in Star Wars?
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