JCC Kindle vs. Nook (vs. Other?)

Discussion in 'Community' started by Valyn, Feb 12, 2011.

  1. Aytee-Aytee Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 20, 2008
    star 5
    I prefer books the most...but in History grad seminars, and the ungodly amount of reading we have to do, my Nook comes in handy. If I like the books enough or think I can use it in the future, I'll go ahead and buy a paper copy.

    I have a classic Nook, and my only real complaint is the sluggishness of the touch screen, and the fact that its in black and white. Eventually im going to get a Nook Color. :)


    EDIT -- To answer Valyn's question...
    There is no glare with the classic nook; as the only LCD screen is the smaller touchscreen menu, but that shuts off after a few minutes of inactivity. The main screen itself looks almost like a piece of newspaper placed behind plexiglass.
    [image=http://www.ces-show.com/news_images/00445_nook-ebook-reader.jpg]
  2. LAJ_FETT Tech Admin and Collecting/Games Mod

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    May 25, 2002
    star 9
    That's one situation where I think a Nook or Kindle makes sense. I remember hauling textbooks around at college and in that situation if I could put some of the reading matter (especially classics for a Lit class) on a Nook or Kindle I'd do it. I'd also be more inclined to use one if I traveled a lot so I wouldn't have to haul books around in luggage.
  3. Espaldapalabras Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Aug 25, 2005
    star 5
    They have book scented perfume if you are buying books for smell. I have a Kindle and I enjoy it quite a bit. I like the e-ink and I get my books the same way I get new movies, tv shows, and music. ;)
  4. NJOfan215 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 17, 2003
    star 5
    I'm in the same boat as Aytee-Aytee, but with one small difference. Since I'm in a mathematical field I end reading a lot of PDF's with equations, tables, and graphs. Does anyone have any experiance reading things like that on an ereader?
  5. anakin_girl Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 8, 2000
    star 6
    I have the Kindle app on my iPod Touch but I rarely use it. I also have iBooks but haven't used it yet. I'm surprised there is such a difference between the UK and the US though.

    Someone mentioned textbooks; I put five of my six textbooks on my Kindle this semester. The sixth one was not available in a Kindle edition. They're half the price of regular textbooks and take up much less space on my shelves.
  6. DarthLowBudget Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 17, 2004
    star 5
    For me its really just more that I have a really hard time reading something on a screen. I'm a very fast reader, and I turn pages very quickly and I'm always flipping back to cross reference things because I'm usually doing a very in-depth read. And then there's difficulty with marking things up. And I think there's an argument to be made for the tactile experience of reading a book engaging you more actively in the story than passively looking at a digital read-out. Also, if I'm going on a trip that's long enough that I might finish the book I'm currently reading, I simply throw another one or two in my bag. But then again like 90% of the storage space in my room is taken up with books that I'm working through, so its been a while since I've run up against the need to buy something new because I've finished the book I"m currently on.
  7. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Nov 28, 2000
    star 10
    I'll disagree there. There's a great market online for used books, especially the older books that I tend to read. Even if they're newly published, the simple fact of being used can make a book dirt cheap, whereas ebooks (in my experience) are only barely cheaper than the real thing.

    Agreed. Although I do like the Kindle's syncing--when I'm at home or anywhere with a laptop, I can use the Kindle PC program and continue from where I left off.

    A lot of my textbooks grant free access to e-copies for the academic term. I leave my textbooks at school and use them in class (easier to page through the real thing) and then do my reading at home on the computer.

    edit: DLB: ew, I hate marking up books. But just so you know, there is a highlight feature to all of these e-reader apps and/or devices. :p It's actually nice to have a fully searchable text. Some Penguin ebooks even have hyperlinked endnotes, so I can read a section and then isntantly zoom back and forth from the text and the critical commentary.

    Ebooks are great if I'd get used to them. I was in a line for 40 minutes at the grocery store and didn't think to pull out my phone and read a bit. I'm still not used to the fact that I can do that now.
  8. AaylaSecurOWNED Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 19, 2005
    star 6
    40 minutes?! What were you buying?

    I agree with Dilb about the marking up. Apparently the Sony's touchscreen lets you scribble directly on to the screen and preserves that, which will beat a mere highlighting feature hands down every day. In law school being able to write a few words in the margin or accentuate words in different ways (underline, circle, square, highlight) was priceless when I was on call. Highlighting is pretty worthless if you can't remember what you were thinking when you highlighted something.
  9. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Nov 28, 2000
    star 10
    Well, I don't highlight or scribble notes. I just remember things, or make it up as I go along. It's done me wonders so far. :p

    And TJ's on weekends = monstrous.
  10. Espaldapalabras Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Aug 25, 2005
    star 5
    Paper books are quaint. Ebooks will greatly increase the amount of reading done, just as we are listening to more music now that ever.

    Go type up your notes on your typewriters by the light of your gas lamp while you listen to vinyl while you spend so much time smelling your book.

    Personally I've always hated the awkward turning of pages while I lay down. A backpack full of books was never something I liked. Paper books will be relegated to a niche market. There is no use fighting it. I think libraries as we know them must change or be reduced to irrelevancy. You can't fight the future.
  11. rhonderoo Former Head Admin

    Member Since:
    Aug 7, 2002
    star 9
    I have a Kindle, and it's pretty fast down-loading, plus I like the keys instead of the touch screen. Charge lasts forever, too.
  12. Valyn Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 2, 2002
    star 8
    So she got me a nook color and I'm currently posting from it. It is pretty awesome. Rapid transfers and downloads, awesome features. Plus I love how you can download samples of books.

    Now someone recommend me a good scifi/fantasy novel :p
  13. mrsvos Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 18, 2005
    star 5
    Search for books 'Science Fiction 0.00'
    Free books.
    Quality?[face_thinking]
  14. Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Mar 19, 1999
    star 7
    I've been checking out books from the library lately, just to enjoy it while I still can.
  15. Valyn Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 2, 2002
    star 8
    I should check out the b&n lending feature
  16. anakin_girl Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 8, 2000
    star 6
    OK, library science student here...

    The library science field is well aware of the e-book market and has plans to adjust itself. There are several issues at the moment--licensing agreements with e-book publishers, compatibility with different e-readers. But many public libraries already lend e-books. The e-books lend to an e-reader for the prescribed period (three weeks at my local public library) then "disappear" off the e-reader.

    My best/worst case scenario projection is that libraries will go entirely online. Patrons will log onto their computers, punch in their card numbers and download e-books to borrow, go into instant messenger for reference services (that's already available in many libraries), access reference databases (again, already available), take workshops, and view children's story times on video. Libraries themselves might go completely virtual but they aren't disappearing. And I think we're a good few decades away from going completely virtual, although technology does tend to update itself faster than I anticipate most of the time. :)

    Just my $.02. [face_peace]
  17. Valyn Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 2, 2002
    star 8
    Barnes and Noble lends books too via its online shop to the Nook.

    As for a scifi/fantasy novel, I am deciding between Blade of Tyshalle or In the Name of the Wind. Both seem to receive some pretty encouraging reviews. And amazon.com is presently selling brand new physical copy of Blade of Tyshalle for $100, whereas the ebook version is $6.

    Quite the price difference, eh?
  18. PRENNTACULAR VIP

    Member Since:
    Dec 21, 2005
    star 6
  19. Valyn Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 2, 2002
    star 8
    I read on cnet that the nook color trumps the ipad in a few areas, including ereader ability.
  20. Jada Chapter Rep Charlotte, NC

    Chapter Rep
    Member Since:
    Apr 20, 2006
    star 6
    Is story time going to go online too? :eek:
  21. The Great No One Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 4, 2005
    star 8

    i understand the use of an e-reader and such, but there's really just something about having a solid book in your hands while you're reading it. i have a ton of stuff to read on my computer... but don't because it's on a screen. just don't like that for whatever reason.
  22. anakin_girl Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 8, 2000
    star 6
    There are actually huge discussions about this in the field. I had to write a paper for my foundations class in which I took the stance of either "the library as a physical place" or "the library as a set of services" regarding which was more important. I took the latter stance, but one of the arguments for the former is children's story times. They are much better done in person than on YouTube IMO. There are also various services for adults that are better in person, such as book groups.

    Just a couple of the reasons why I believe that it will be a very long time before libraries go completely virtual, if they do so at all. I do think the number of in-person services as well as physical books will be reduced though.
  23. moosemousse CR - FF:UK South

    Chapter Rep
    Member Since:
    Oct 3, 2004
    star 6
    I love my kindle, and there's a lot to love about. To start with, amazon has a whole load of free classics available for instant download. I downloaded a large number of books within minutes. There are a lot of books on amazon that are available for the kindle, though it's not always cheaper to buy them in kindle format. Another thing I like is the buttons. Easy to use and my thumb doesn't cover any part of the screen when I press them. The screen is just fantastic too. I have problems reading a large amount of text on a computer screen due to monitors being illuminated and the general brightness of the screen. However, the kindle screen is crystal clear, razor sharp, and not backlit at all. It's very easy to read and I can spend hours reading with it and not have any problems at all. I don't have the 3G version as I don't need 3G capabilities, but the wi-fi version is just great. Even if you have some ebooks, as long as they're compatible, they can been transferred via the USB cable that comes with the kindle.

    So yeah, my advice would be to get a kindle. There are other ebook readers out there but I wouldn't touch one with a colour screen (or any other backlit screen). Even if you're fine with reading backlit screens they tend to drain the power a lot and you get a few hours of reading with one compared to a few weeks with a kindle.
  24. GrandAdmiralJello Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Nov 28, 2000
    star 10
    It's not easy to get rare translations in ebook format, and it's generally harder to page through things to determine if they're to your liking with the limited preview capacity afforded to them. I like them for the convenience, but once I got over the novelty I've started lugging around real books again. There's just something more comforting to them.

    So I'm making use of my library checking out books I own but don't have with me rather than reading digital versions of them. A lot of monographs can't be found in e-book format alone, but it's also because I'm really annoyed at the notion of buying a book I already owned.
  25. xblackout Game Winner

    Game Winner
    Member Since:
    Jun 5, 2008
    star 4
    I'm reading Blade of Tyshalle right now [a physical copy :p] & it's a total mind****. I felt like it started off slowly but once things got moving, I haven't been able to put it down.

    As for the whole physical versus electronic thing, I'm with dilb. I have a difficult time reading longer pieces on a screen & I just seem to do much better with actual printed pages. Even when I was doing all of my research in college, I'd print out all of my sources rather than just reading them/marking them up online. Now, the screen on the Nook is different from a computer screen & it doesn't seem to bother my eyes as much, but I'd still pick an actual book over an e-book.