Kurosawa's influence on SW

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by Darth-Stryphe, Feb 3, 2003.

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  1. Emi-Yan_Tetu Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Dec 5, 2001
    star 2
    Hey Stryphe, my Throne Of Blood DVD is from the British Film Institute.

    Well I think Flash Gordon was certainly the greatest inspiration if not the greatest influence.

    Have you seen Flash Gordon Conquers The Galaxy? I have that on DVD also.

    There are so many Star Wars moments, especially ANH. I'm thinking of the scenes in particular where Flash and his mate dress up in enemy soldier uniform to sneek around the enemy base. This was undoubtedly (in my opinion) the influence for the corresponding scene in ANH.

    There are many more.

    I also like the Rock Men scene in AOTC. Lucas even makes mention of this on the DVD commentary.
  2. Darth-Stryphe Former Mod and City Rep

    Member Since:
    Apr 24, 2001
    star 6
    Hey Stryphe, my Throne Of Blood DVD is from the British Film Institute.

    Can I assume then that it is not encoded for Region 1?
  3. Emi-Yan_Tetu Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Dec 5, 2001
    star 2
  4. Darth-Stryphe Former Mod and City Rep

    Member Since:
    Apr 24, 2001
    star 6
  5. Emi-Yan_Tetu Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Dec 5, 2001
    star 2
    ;)


    Anyway... let's consider Kurosawa's influence in a non-confrontational way.

    As I mentioned in TPM board I always thought Qui-Gon's character in The Phantom Menace was heavily influenced by Toshiro Mifune's character in Yojimbo. The fashion in which he uses the bad characters greed to contribute to their downfall is very similar I think.

    Also similar in the way that their actions at times could be considered as dishonest and perhaps morally questionable but in their larger scale are positive actions performed as an undeniable act of good.

    I also see great similarities in the acting styles. Do you think Lucas gave Neeson Toshiro Mifune's acting style as a point of reference for playing the Jedi?


    By the way, we need more TPM pics in the banner for this forum! I demand a pic of Qui-Gon.
  6. Darth-Stryphe Former Mod and City Rep

    Member Since:
    Apr 24, 2001
    star 6
    I also see great similarities in the acting styles. Do you think Lucas gave Neeson Toshiro Mifune's acting style as a point of reference for playing the Jedi?

    Hmm, I don't know. If so, it doesn't show, IMO. Toshiro had a much more stronger presence. If I had to compair Liam's acting style to a Kurosawa character, it would similar to that of the guy who played the older samuri in 7S.


    By the way, we need more TPM pics in the banner for this forum! I demand a pic of Qui-Gon.

    Nah, use of the CT in the banner is perfect. ;)

    Oh, and speaking of Throne of Blood: Criterion Collection DVD, May 20th. :cool:

  7. TheOzhaggis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 1, 2000
    star 5

    And still on the topic of Throne of Blood ... try watching the scenes with Washizu and Miki trotting out of the mist on horseback, flags waving on their backs, and try not to think of the gungans riding out of the mist with their 'flags' waving on their backs ...

    And there are others, too. Makes me wish I had the movie on DVD. Gah.

    Of course, you can argue the same for Tolkien & Jackson - since Tolkien (admitted himself) that Two Towers & Return of the King were basically his version of Macbeth: he didn't like Shakespeare cheating his way out of the prophecies of the trees attacking the castle, and the villain not being killed by a 'man born of woman', so he wrote a "better version."

    Is that plagiarism? Homage? Satire? Improvement? Criticism?

    And then consider that most of Shakespeare's stories were simply rewrites of older stories, sometimes action for action ... and those stories were probably rewrites of stories older still ...

    Either way, you start getting into a twisted game of Six Degrees of George Lucas...

    Or consider Pulp Fiction. Apart from stealing SLJ, you could also make an argument for Lucas "stealing" the Big Kahuna sequence for he intro of TPM: the big boss (Marcellus/Vallorum) sends two of his right hand men (Vincent & Jules/Obiwan & QuiGon) to deal with some upstarts who have gotten in out of their heads (the young guys/neimoidians), only to be ambushed, and then somehow miraculously survive the encounter ... (you would certainly think so if TPM was the first time you'd seen SW ...)


    But then according to Vladmir Propp, the guru of russian fairytales, all stories are variations of the same tale. The names of the characters change, but the actions they perform remain the same. Consider:

    "The king gives Ivan a horse. The horse carries Ivan to another land."
    "An old man gives Ivan an eagle. The eagle carries Ivan to another land."
    "A wizard gives Ivan a little boat. The boat carries Ivan to another land."
    "A princess gives Ivan a ring. Spirits appear from the ring and carry Ivan to another land."

    Totally different stories, but the same plot (transport to another kingdom).
    Or totally different nouns, but the same verbs. Or ... the song changes, but the words remain the same.

    In this way, Propp goes on to show that all russian fairytales are really just the same story. And then Joseph Campbell came along, read Propp and Jung, and realised that all myths are are just variations on the same story ... and then Lucas reads Propp, Campbell, and Jung ...

    So, it is plagiarism. And then again, it isn't plagiarism ... from a certain point of view.


    Or to quote the great bard, Bono: "Every poet's a thief..."


    [/incoherent ramble]
  8. Darth-Stryphe Former Mod and City Rep

    Member Since:
    Apr 24, 2001
    star 6
    And there are others, too. Makes me wish I had the movie on DVD. Gah.

    Soon, soon, one day plus one month. ;)


    Of course, you can argue the same for Tolkien & Jackson - since Tolkien (admitted himself) that Two Towers & Return of the King were basically his version of Macbeth:

    Really? I don't see it. How so?
  9. TheOzhaggis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 1, 2000
    star 5

    At the risk of derailing the thread with a discussion of Tolkien & Shakespeare, this is my last word on the topic (anything else, PM me):

    The story of Macbeth rests on two prophecies by the three witches: "none of women born / Shall harm Macbeth" and Macbeth has nothing to fear until "Great Birnam wood" moves to "high Dunsinane hill" near his castle.

    But the prophecies are realised when Macduff attacks and uses the trees from Birnam wood as camouflage, and announces that he was not born but pluck'd from his mother by caesarian...

    In his notes for LOTR, Tolkien admits that he is not a fan of shakespeare and believed that this was cheating. So he decided to rewrite these parts of Macbeth, and did so in LOTR:

    The Ents attacking Isengard are Tolkien's version of Great Birnam Wood advancing on the castle.

    And the killing of the Lord of the Nazgul by Eowyn is his solution to the "no man born of woman" prophesy.

  10. Darth-Stryphe Former Mod and City Rep

    Member Since:
    Apr 24, 2001
    star 6
    Very informative. Thought is seems he was just borrowing a few references, not fashioning the entire last two books from MacBeth.

    Anyway, back to Kurosawa and Lucas...
  11. bright sith Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 27, 1999
    star 5
    A lot of interesting things in this thread, but I think most focus on the themes, or apparent images that might be shared by the two filmmakers. However, stylistically, Lucas doesn't seem to have been influenced a great deal.

    The biggest apparent similarity is Lucas' use of wipes to transition scenes. Kurosawa was, and still is, the best wipe user of all time. Nonetheless, the two used it quite differently. Lucas' wipes become part of the rhythm of the movies, they are commonplace, used as if to smooth out a straight cut, especially during intercutting of different places.

    In contrast, Kurosawa uses the wipe as a major punctuation during his films. One of the most memorable uses of it comes in the middle of High and Low; the first half of the movie had all taken place in one room, and all of a sudden, the wipe brings us to a fast and furious bullet-train.

    Someone in this thread also suggested that the riding in Throne of Blood reminds him/her of the Gungans with flags. Well, again, the image might be similar, but the purpose and style is completely different. The purpose and meaning is very obvious
    if you have seen the films; how do they achieve it so that the outcomes are so different?

    Lucas' style treats it like an epic. Long, static shots are used to emphasize on the size of the Gungan groups. That of course is his intention; this is a prelude to a rousing battle, not a psychologically complex scene.

    Kurosawa's staging in Throne of Blood
    has the riders constantly going in circles. There's a lot of fog--like the initial image of the Gungans coming to battle--but it's meant to be confusing: and it is. The fog does not go away. Kurosawa uses a lot of successive panning shots to follow the riders, resulting in an endless ride. He shoots through objects, trees, hills, etc. Nothing like the long shot that Lucas uses to show the Gungans. The result is gothic, and a sense of madness.
  12. bad radio Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 26, 1999
    star 4
    >>>> And still on the topic of Throne of Blood ... try watching the scenes with Washizu and Miki trotting out of the mist on horseback, flags waving on their backs, and try not to think of the gungans riding out of the mist with their 'flags' waving on their backs ...

    A better comparison is Kagemusha or Ran.

    >>>> However, stylistically, Lucas doesn't seem to have been influenced a great deal.

    Now that?s simply not true. The basis for both men?s ?style? is a search for reality and an inability to tolerate illusion. Their characters are the same?they?re overcome with the need to know things as they really are. They suffer because through suffering the characters know that they really exist. What?s more, both directors? preoccupation with the differences between illusion and reality extend to their camera work too, most notably their use of the telephoto lens. Ever wonder why some scenes in ANH look as if they are two-dimensional, i.e., the actors look as if they standing right on top of each other? That?s because Lucas shot the scenes from a far distance away and used long lenses to really zoom in on the actors. The telephoto lens makes things appear closer together when they are lined up along the camera?s line of sight, which is something Lucas most definitely acquired from Kurosawa. Why does Lucas do this? Because like Kurosawa, Lucas likes to then cut 90 degrees to show the actual space that exists between the actors, which is always a much larger distance than what was originally perceived. Again, this ?illusion versus reality? is a part of both men?s style?it?s one of the ways both directors express themselves visually. (Incidentally, George?s new HD cam achieves the same effect as using long lenses with the obvious exception that the camera can be much closer to the actors. This is a downside, though, because the actors are more conscious of where the camera is when they?re shooting. In the OT and some scenes in TPM, the actors had the benefit of being somewhat unaware of where the camera was for the reason that it was so far away, which made for more ?natural? performances.)

    >>>> In contrast, Kurosawa uses the wipe as a major punctuation during his films. One of the most memorable uses of it comes in the middle of High and Low; the first half of the movie had all taken place in one room, and all of a sudden, the wipe brings us to a fast and furious bullet-train.

    Again I have to disagree. George?s editing is very similar to Kurosawa?s. Kurosawa uses fades and dissolves to show to show a passage of time, and he uses the wipe as a single movement that cancels outs everything that came before it and introduces something new. Sometimes, as is the case with H&L, Kurosawa would use the wipe after an important scene in order to draw attention to it. Here?s a little experiment for you: Watch the scene in The Hidden Fortress where the heroes try to go back to the hidden fortress only to find that it has been destroyed. Then watch the scene in ANH where Luke goes back to the farm after he and Ben discover the dead jawas. (Try to watch both scenes side by side.) If George?s editing is so different than Kurosawa?s, how do you explain the editing in those scenes? It?s impossible to tell them apart from an editor?s POV. Even the ends of both scenes are capped off with a wipe from left to right.
  13. Durwood Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 18, 2002
    star 5
    The biggest apparent similarity is Lucas' use of wipes to transition scenes.

    Actually, the wipes along with the opening crawl are an homage to the black and white Flash Gordan seriels. The old films used wipes in a similiar fashion to transition from one scene or location to another. Lucas uses wipes in a similiar if not identical manner, and any relation to Kurosawa could be mere coincidence. This argument is given further weight when you recognize that Lucas' original idea was to create an up to date version of Flash Gordan but was unable to secure the rights and was thus inpsired to create STAR WARS.

    When it comes right down to it, STAR WARS bears as much stylistic similarity to the old movie seriels as it does to Kurosawa's films showing that Lucas' inspirations are drawn from a wide range of subjects.
  14. Darth-Stryphe Former Mod and City Rep

    Member Since:
    Apr 24, 2001
    star 6
    However, stylistically, Lucas doesn't seem to have been influenced a great deal.

    Agreed.


    What?s more, both directors? preoccupation with the differences between illusion and reality extend to their camera work too, most notably their use of the telephoto lens.

    I don't see this. Lucas may have attempted to pattern a Kurosawa visual style, but aside from the wipes, I don't think he's succeeded.

    Durwood, Lucas credits Kurosawa as an influence. I don't think anyone said Lucas was only influenced by Kurosawa and nothing else. The Flash Gordon inspiration is well known.
  15. DrEvazan Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jun 19, 2002
    star 4
    "Lucas uses wipes in a similiar if not identical manner, and any relation to Kurosawa could be mere coincidence."

    COINCIDENCE? after you yourself have cited that Lucas acknowledges Kurosawa's influence on Star Wars you really are going to suppose that Lucas, after having watched Kurosawa coinicidentally used the exact same transitions? talk about stretches.

    lets see, Lucas uses identical themes, shots, storylines, dialougue, character models... the list goes on and on... but the transitions being the same is only a coincidence.

    this is really getting silly, the lengths some will go to hide/disguise the obvious facts.
  16. Durwood Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 18, 2002
    star 5
    COINCIDENCE? after you yourself have cited that Lucas acknowledges Kurosawa's influence on Star Wars you really are going to suppose that Lucas, after having watched Kurosawa coinicidentally used the exact same transitions? talk about stretches.

    No, it's a perfectly reasonable conclussion seeing as Lucas uses wipes in a way that is virtually identical to the way they are used in old movie seriels and only superficially similiar to Kurosawa's technique.

    lets see, Lucas uses identical themes, shots, storylines, dialougue, character models... the list goes on and on...

    He uses similiar themes, shots, and so on. Not identical, similiar.

    this is really getting silly, the lengths some will go to hide/disguise the obvious facts.

    Indeed.
  17. Vanthorne_OX Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 11, 2002
    star 3
    I doubt it is a coincedence, but there's no need to badger one another over it.

    bad radio wrote: "What?s more, both directors? preoccupation with the differences between illusion and reality extend to their camera work too, most notably their use of the telephoto lens. Ever wonder why some scenes in ANH look as if they are two-dimensional, i.e., the actors look as if they standing right on top of each other? That?s because Lucas shot the scenes from a far distance away and used long lenses to really zoom in on the actors. The telephoto lens makes things appear closer together when they are lined up along the camera?s line of sight, which is something Lucas most definitely acquired from Kurosawa. Why does Lucas do this? Because like Kurosawa, Lucas likes to then cut 90 degrees to show the actual space that exists between the actors, which is always a much larger distance than what was originally perceived. Again, this ?illusion versus reality? is a part of both men?s style?it?s one of the ways both directors express themselves visually."

    Two things. The biggest illusion vs. reality moment that comes to mind is Luke's failure at the cave. Also, bad radio, you've just given me another reason to look forward to seeing ANH again. I'll check out this camera effect you've mentioned. As if I needed a reason ;).
  18. bad radio Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 26, 1999
    star 4
    >>>> I don't see this. Lucas may have attempted to pattern a Kurosawa visual style, but aside from the wipes, I don't think he's succeeded.

    This is what I?m talking about.
    [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/ANH050.JPG]
    When you?re using long lenses and things are lined up along the camera?s line of sight, then the depth-of-field is increased, which optically reduces the distance between objects on the screen. In the above screen-cap everything is in focus (sorry, a JPEG just doesn?t do the resolution justice), and everyone looks as if they?re standing on top of one another. Lucas used a telephoto lens while shooting that scene so that in the editing room Marcia could cut the shot 90 degrees to show just how far apart everyone really is?this is definitely a Kurosawa thing.
    [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/ANH051.JPG]

    Many times when Kurosawa wanted to show in the story that one of his characters was being deceived, he would use this very device. The following pics are from his film Red Beard. They show the idealistic doctor as he?s being seduced by the crazy/beautiful patient right before she tries to kill him.
    [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/RED001.JPG] [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/RED003.JPG]
    In the first picture you can?t tell just how much space exists between the actors. Then the camera angle changes 90 degrees and all of the sudden the space between them is revealed. Likewise in SW, when the story calls for a character to lie, sometimes Lucas gives the scene the ?Kurosawa? treatment.
    [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/ANH043.JPG] [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/ANH044.JPG]
    (You should also check out any scene in the prequels that has Palpatine in it. Start with the hologram scene on Naboo: ?How could that be true?! I have assurances from the Chancellor? His Ambassadors did arrive.?)
  19. bad radio Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 26, 1999
    star 4
    >>>> No, it's a perfectly reasonable conclussion seeing as Lucas uses wipes in a way that is virtually identical to the way they are used in old movie seriels and only superficially similiar to Kurosawa's technique.

    You are not fooling anyone Durwood? I don?t think you?ve even seen Space Soldiers or FGCTU. On the surface, the editing in ANH is supposed to remind you of those old serials because the wipes look similar to the old Flash Gordon movies, but under the façade the wipes are used differently. I challenge you to find the following series of wipes in a Flash Gordon movie:
    [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/ANH048.JPG] [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/ANH045.JPG] [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/ANH049.JPG]
    [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/ANH046.JPG] [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/ANH047.JPG]
    You won?t find them because they?re not there. It?s a technique that you won?t find anywhere else in cinema with the exception of one other place?in a Kurosawa film. A good example of it just happens to be in THF:
    [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/THF072.JPG] [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/THF073.JPG] [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/THF074.JPG]
    [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/THF075.JPG] [image=http://members.cox.net/badradio/THF076.JPG]
    The end of an important scene starts with a wipe; the wipe draws attention to the scene. In the above two examples, the significance of the scene in ANH is that Luke just answered the ?call to adventure,? and in THF the two peasants are freed from slavery. As the wipe moves across the screen, it reveals that there is something ?chasing? the wipe in the new scene; Luke?s landspeeder and the two peasants are chasing their respective wipes. The momentum will linger for a second as the camera follows the action, and then another wipe appears where the first one began. This second wipe catches up to the action and wipes it out of the picture to reveal the next scene, which is usually a brand new location/environment. That?s just the tip of the iceberg.

    I can?t fathom why you said that George?s wipes are identical to those used in Flash Gordon and that they are likewise only superficially comparable to Kurosawa?s. Anyone who takes the time to compare these films will realize that the opposite is true?the substance is definitely Kurosawa but the surface is Flash Gordon. Are you banking that no one will actually watch the films in question to call your bluff?
  20. bad radio Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 26, 1999
    star 4
    >>>> The biggest illusion vs. reality moment that comes to mind is Luke's failure at the cave.

    Actually I think the biggest illusion vs. reality moment comes at the end of ROTJ when the character we thought was evil actually turns out to be a good guy who saves the day. But SW abounds with other examples of the theme of illusion vs. reality that are taken from Kurosawa films. Some that I can think of off the top of my head are:

    - The attack on the Death Star. We knew exactly how Luke was going to destroy that Death Star because it was all laid out for us via that big hologram of the Death Star. This is taken from Seven Samurai when Kambei shows his men the map of the village and accordingly tells them how the bandits will attack and lays out how the villagers and the samurai will react. The illusion is the well laid out plans and the reality is the dreadfulness of the actual attack?they?re quite different from one another.

    - Luke and his seeker-ball training. We see Luke in ANH blocking blaster bolts with his lightsaber. This is very different from ROTJ where he?s repelling blaster bolts from Jabba?s henchmen on the sail barge. This is taken from Yojimbo or Seven Samurai. In Yojimbo, while Sanjuro is recovering from his injuries, we catch a glimpse of him impaling dry leaves with a knife. Who would have guessed that those dry leaves would soon become real men in the showdown at the end of the film? In Seven Samurai we see Heihachi wood-chopping. He makes a reference to the wood being a man, and sure enough we later see him ?man-chopping? during the raid on the bandits? camp. (Naturally this motif pops up again in AOTC when we see the Jedi kids practicing with their lightsabers. This has got to be one of the darkest scenes in the movie because later we see the Jedi being blasted to bits in the arena?we just know that, ultimately, the kids will not be able to escape a similar fate.)

    - Obi-Wan Kenobi?s ?certain point of view.? Taken from the characters in Rashomon?even the dead guy can?t tell the truth.
  21. MeBeJedi Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 30, 2002
    star 6
    "We knew exactly how Luke was going to destroy that Death Star because it was all laid out for us via that big hologram of the Death Star. This is taken from Seven Samurai when Kambei shows his men the map of the village and accordingly tells them how the bandits will attack and lays out how the villagers and the samurai will react. The illusion is the well laid out plans and the reality is the dreadfulness of the actual attack?they?re quite different from one another."

    This is also done in every bank-robbery movie. Not much of a comparison there.

    "We see Luke in ANH blocking blaster bolts with his lightsaber. This is very different from ROTJ where he?s repelling blaster bolts from Jabba?s henchmen on the sail barge."

    This is also done in every martial arts film. I think Neo's first fight in "The Matrix" is a far better example of this concept.

    "Obi-Wan Kenobi?s ?certain point of view.? Taken from the characters in Rashomon?even the dead guy can?t tell the truth."

    Two words: Fight Club
  22. bad radio Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 26, 1999
    star 4
    >>>> This is also done in every bank-robbery movie. Not much of a comparison there.

    Not true. Kurosawa was the first to really lay things out so meticulously that the audience felt intimately connected to the village before they had ever laid eyes on it.

    >>>> "The Matrix" is a far better example [?] Two words: Fight Club

    All of those movies you mentioned are recent films. What?s more, they?re very bad examples to support your argument. Where do you think they got their ideas from? Ask the Wachowskis what movie they consider to be ?the greatest action film of all time.? Their answer: Seven Samurai. And David Fincher has said that Kurosawa is one of his major influences?but maybe that?s just because Fincher worked with George on ROTJ???

    MBJ, come back when you have seen a Kurosawa flick. You have the OT Laserdiscs (def collection), right? Listen to George?s commentary on the TESB disc regarding ?the philosophy of ?Do?? and then go read Kurosawa?s autobiography. There?s a section in that book that describes almost word for word what George describes in his commentary. Lucas is so fake that it ties me up in knots considering I idolized him as a kid.
  23. bad radio Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 26, 1999
    star 4
    Something I wanted to add:

    >>>>This is also done in every martial arts film.

    You should watch Kurosawa?s Sanshiro Sugata (1943). The fight scene at the end of the film is the most famous in all Japanese cinema and its influence continues to this day. Plus this film is also where Lucas gets his ?I can?t kill my own father? scene in ROTJ.
  24. MeBeJedi Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 30, 2002
    star 6
    "MBJ , come back when you have seen a Kurosawa flick."

    First of all, it would appear that I already have, if you recall your opinion of Star Wars. ;)

    Secondly, I have Ran and The Hidden Fortress on DVD. There's another false assumption laid to waste. Of course, the possession or experience of the films by others has never prevented you from telling people to watch the films again, based on the assumption that they didn't see what you so obviously saw, so yours is really a moot point at best.

    "You have the OT Laserdiscs (def collection), right? Listen to George?s commentary on the TESB disc regarding ?the philosophy of ?Do?"

    Yes, I have, and yes, I did. It was interesting, but short.

    With respect, I'll continue to post in this thread until I grow tired of it. This is not your thread by which to give or suspend posting privileges. Up until now, it's been a more pleasant thread.

    In the meantime, see if you can find any movies that Kurosawa himself copied from. I'm sure someone of your theatrical knowledge and expertise is capable of it. This request assumes, of course, that you agree with the posit that Kurosawa himself is capable of being influenced by other movies and/or or sources, and was not completely original in every aspect of his film.

    Speaking of "originality"...

    "go read Kurosawa?s autobiography. There?s a section in that book that describes almost word for word what George describes in his commentary."

    Of course, the biggest irony is that you keep repeating this mantra of "Lucas stole ideas" when every other post of yours is a tremendous and blatant example of copyright violation. While you and Lucas do give credit where credit is due, both of you are guilty of standing on the shoulders of giants to get your point across (by your reasoning, of course.)

    I would wager that Kurosawa was much more pleased with Lucas' "homage" (intentional or otherwise) than the "copyright owners" of your books would feel, if they knew you were copying entire paragraphs and - in some cases - whole pages. I understand your need to put your interpretation beyond reproach with gobs of quotes, but I'm sure the writers would rather you summarize or paraphrase their work (or better yet, encourage others to buy these books), rather than "cut & paste". These sources should serve as the basis of your argument, not the meat of it.

    (I've often wondered if, by going back over your old posts, I might be able to recreate at least one of your books as a whole, thus saving me the money for more DVD's.)

    Unfortunately, your indignation when all this effort fails to persuade others occurs over and over again, and rather than accept the fact that some people simply don't agree, you are compelled to state that it is based on a deficiency on their part. If you don't believe this, then you are delud........

    Oops, sorry. Nasty habit, that. ;)

    I'm sure it will take you some time to find an appropriate Kurosawa quote to respond to my post in a meaningful way, so I'll be patient. Then again, you may simply use some semi-interesting, slap-shot, "may-or-may-not-be-true" anecdote, a la "I was trying to prove to a buddy of mine at work that I had my own internet stalker." to defer attention from the real issue. Either way, please refrain from using any pictures in your response to me, since I am using a dial-up account, and posting links to pics is frowned upon as a waste of bandwidth. A link to your webpage should be more than sufficient. Of course, you are also welcome to simply ignore my post. A third possibility to consider is that, if you feel your efforts are truly unappreciated, and that people care as little for your interpretation as you do for theirs, you could simply leave the boards...AGAIN!

    Of course, the best choice is to live and let live. I wish you luck in this endeavor.

    Okay, I think I'm done...for now. ;)
  25. CieSharp Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 18, 2002
    star 4
    badradio,

    Your posts with the graphic files illustrating the parallels between the Star Wars saga and Kurosawa's epics are very interesting.

    I'm curious, did anyone catch the amazing similarity between the "rolling in the flower meadow" scene with Anakin and Padme on the planet Naboo in Attack of the Clones, and the "rolling in the flower meadow" scene in Seven Samurai with Katushiro and Shino?

    I'd take some screen caps to show the similarities, but I have no server space of my own.

    Also, on the first page, somebody pointed out that there is no parallel in Star Wars that would coincide with the death of the General's sister as a decoy in the Hidden Fortress. I just watched Hidden Fortress for the first time today and when I watched that scene, Padme's use of decoys (ex, Corde's death in the beginning of Episode 2) immediately came to mind.
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