Lucas Spermatikos? Possible Significance of Lucas' Cameo in the Opera Scene

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by JediFlannel, Apr 9, 2006.

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  1. JediFlannel Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    May 22, 2005
    Is there some significance to the fact that Lucas' cameo comes during the Opera Scene in ROTS? I think there might be.

    Here's my idea, and please rememeber it's just an idea. Obviously, the only one who really knows Lucas' inspiration for these stories is Lucas himself:

    As has been noted by many others, the "show" that Palpatine watches during the Opera Scene in ROTS resembles sperm floating around an egg. Clearly, this imagery of sperm floating around an egg relates to the story that Palpatine tells Anakin about the Sith Lord who was so powerful that he was able to influence the midichlorians to create life. Palpatine, of course, uses this story to convince Anakin that there is a way to save Padme from dying; unfortunately, Anakin succumbs to Palpatine's influence and loses Padme as a result. In his downfall, Anakin falls prey to the common literary/mythological flaw of "overreaching" or attempting to harness power that is beyond the bounds of human control. He is joined in this character flaw by such characters as Adam and Eve (attempting to eat the fruit of knowledge), Icarus (who flew too close to the sun), Dr. Faustus (who made a deal with Satan for supernatural power), and Dr. Frankenstein (who paid the price for discovering the secret to the creation of life).

    Is it possible that Lucas suffers (or has suffered) from this flaw himself? And, more specifically, is there a personal connection for Lucas between "overreaching" and the ability/inability to create life?

    Keeping in mind Anakin's tragic flaw of "overreaching," consider what we know of Lucas' work habits and career. From the biographical materials that I've read (various interviews, Skywalking, Empire Building) I've learned that Lucas consisently made himself sick from working long hours during the production of A New Hope. And, from the many interviews with actors and other members of the production crew that I've seen on DVD's and TV, I've gotten the impression that Lucas is a classic type "A" workaholic.

    If you combine these descriptions of Lucas' type "A" character with some information about his marriage and family life, some interesting parallels with Anakin's story begin to appear. As some of you may know, Lucas' (3?) children are all adopted. And, as some of you may also know, Lucas and his former wife divorced in the 80's (I think) while he was still making the OT. I've read, of course, that an inability to have children, for whatever reason, can cause significant stress in a marriage. Perhaps this was the case in the Lucas marriage. If this was the case, perhaps George dealt with this stress by focusing all of his energy on his work (making the Star Wars movies), leading to further domestic trouble. In this situation, George himself, burdened with an inability to procreate, suffered the flaw of the mythological "overreacher", working night and day to create his work of art (the OT). Tragically, like Anakin, George's inability to come to terms with his human limitations (inability to procreate and subsequent focus on career) led to the loss of his wife.

    Obviously, if my specualtions are correct(or even close to correct), then the Opera scene would have a very personal significance for Lucas. Perhaps for this reason he decided that his one cameo in the saga should come during this scene, which perhaps more than any other in the saga was inspired by the events of his personal life.

    What do you guys think?
  2. zombie Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Aug 4, 1999
    star 4
    Well you do make an interesting point regarding Anakin's conception and Lucas' own inability to naturally concieve his own children. I don't know what specific medical condition he has but he is indeed infertile, which is why he adopted, even when he was married.

    The second part of your analysis i think is incorrect, and that is the "overreaching" theory, that Lucas compensated his deficiency by dedicating himself to his work. I refute this because in a 1983 or 81 interview, before he was divorced and just after he adopted Amanda, Lucas revealed that he himself was desperate to have children, and not, or not just his wife--but he deliberately waited until he was in semi-retirement because he knew his work would keep him busy. IIRC, Marcia wanted one back in the 70's but George thought it would be best to wait until the trilogy was complete so a compromise of 1981 was decided. This may have been the famous Starlog interview of 1981 but i cant remember. So while his work and his children are kinda linked in that way, they are not linked in the way that you are asserting, that he dedicated himself to work because of his lack of children--just the opposite in fact. He is simply a hard-worker.
  3. JediFlannel Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    May 22, 2005
    Cool, thanks Zombie. It sounds like you know some info about Lucas' personal life. Would you agree, though, that like Anakin, Lucas was kind of annointed (by the press and the fans too I guess) to be the "Chosen One" of cinema? For some reason, when I watch the prequels, I can just picture Lucas relating Anakin's desire to be the greatest Jedi to his desire to be a great filmmaker.
  4. zombie Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Aug 4, 1999
    star 4
    Wow, thats another parallel i never even considered as well. Lucas and Star Wars was put on a pedestal higher than anyone could live up to--a "modern myth", "greatest story ever told" along with the "savior of cinema" and "the greatest storyteller of our time"; these are not hyperbole but actual quotes. Lucas was indeed a kind of pop-cultural "Chosen One" who was destined to fail in the eyes of his followers. This may all be coincidental but they certainly work. I think most would agree that Anakin's unusual conception and his Chosen One prophecy were additions that Lucas added when writing the prequels--perhaps they were subconsciously shaped by his own developing life? I wonder. Interesting speculation though. Given the subconscious nature of creative writing its hardly unreasonable to assert that Lucas personal issues snaked their way into the story.
  5. i_dont_know Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 6, 2005
    star 4
    That's really weird, I had a similar thought. Like the Jedi Council represents everyone who criticised his work?
    Maybe this is just one big group hallucination.
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