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Lit Marvel Star Wars: General News & Trades Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Literature' started by Jedi Ben, Mar 7, 2015.

  1. bsmith7174

    bsmith7174 Jedi Knight star 3

    Registered:
    Apr 17, 2015
    https://www.newsarama.com/39552-mar...ridge-a-new-hope-and-empire-strikes-back.html
    Marvel's STAR WARS #50 To Bridge A NEW HOPE and EMPIRE STRIKES BACK

    Press Release


    After building their forces in complete secrecy, the Rebel Fleet is finally ready. But how long will they be able to stay hidden from the dark clutches of the Empire – and Darth Vader himself? Star Wars fans won’t want to miss series writer Kieron Gillen’s epic landmark issue where all may be lost…and all hope may die!

    “When I was asked to take over the book, having a big story for the magical issue #50 was very much in my goals,” said Gillen. “As such, I've spent the first twelve issues building up to this, which is basically the biggest story I've told in Star Wars. It's an event-level tragedy on an epic scale, and it’s designed as the key bridging piece between A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back. I also haven't written Darth Vader in ages, so now's the time to start having my lightsaber fun again!”

    Since the comic’s launch in 2015, fans have followed the legendary journey of Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, and more fan-favorite characters as the Rebellion pushed forward in their fight against the Galactic Empire. After taking over as the series writer in fall 2017, Gillen’s masterful storytelling is reaching new heights in this monumental next chapter. Packed with pages of action and intrigue, behold the beginning of the boldest high-stakes Star Wars story ever told – in stores this July!

    STAR WARS #50
    Written by Kieron Gillen
    Art by Salvador Larroca
    Cover by Mike Mayhew
    On-Sale 7/4/18

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  2. bsmith7174

    bsmith7174 Jedi Knight star 3

    Registered:
    Apr 17, 2015
    Marvel July 2018 solicitations

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    STAR WARS #50
    KIERON GILLEN (W) • SALVADOR LARROCA (A)
    Cover by MIKE MAYHEW
    Variant Cover by PHIL NOTO
    Variant Cover by David Marquez
    Variant Cover by TERRy DODSON
    VIRGIN VARIANT Cover by TERRy DODSON
    Galactic Icon Variant Cover by ROD REIS
    Action Figure Variant Cover by JOHN TYLER CHRISTOPHER
    IN THIS ISSUE…HOPE DIES.
    • The REBEL FLEET is completed. It’s magnificent. It’s beautiful. It’s secret.
    • But no secret is kept for long from DARTH VADER.
    • The most epic story yet done in a STAR WARS comic begins here. Prepare to witness the Empire TRULY strike back.
    32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
    Star Wars © Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Text and illustrations for Star Wars are © 2018 Lucasfilm Ltd.

    [​IMG]
    STAR WARS #51
    KIERON GILLEN (W) • SALVADOR LARROCA (A)
    Cover by MIKE MAYHEW
    Action Figure Variant Cover by JOHN TYLER CHRISTOPHERR
    HOPE DIES PART 2
    • The MILLENNIUM FALCON – alone – versus an entire IMPERIAL FLEET.
    • Can LEIA discover the cause of this disaster?
    • And even if she can, is it too late?
    32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
    Star Wars © Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Text and illustrations for Star Wars are © 2018 Lucasfilm Ltd.

    [​IMG]
    STAR WARS: LANDO – DOUBLE OR NOTHING #3 (of 5)
    RODNEY BARNES (W) • Paolo Villanelli (A)
    Cover by W. SCOTT FORBES
    Variant Cover by TBA
    • LANDO’s luck ran out when he was captured by BATALLA.
    • Batalla’s in luck with a big payoff if he turns Lando over to his enemies. And there’s a lot of them.
    • Will a galaxy of bad guys finally get their due against the ultimate thorn in their side?
    32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
    Star Wars © Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Text and illustrations for Star Wars are © 2018 Lucasfilm Ltd.

    [​IMG]
    DARTH VADER ANNUAL #2
    CHUCK WENDIG (W) • Leonard Kirk (A)
    Cover by MIKE DEODATO JR.
    Variant Cover by TBA
    DARTH VADER intends for the Empire to hold no secrets for him — or from him. Which means it is time to dig into the pet project of GOVERNOR WILHUFF TARKIN and ORSON KRENNIC: the massive battle station being built on GEONOSIS. Opportunity arises when the project is hindered by sabotage from unknown forces. THE EMPEROR calls on his dark enforcer to root out the source of treachery that threatens to destabilize the Empire’s galactic ascent.
    32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
    Star Wars © Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Text and illustrations for Star Wars are © 2018 Lucasfilm Ltd.

    [​IMG]
    DARTH VADER #18
    CHARLES SOULE (W) • GIUSEPPE CAMUNCOLI (A)
    Cover by GIUSEPPE CAMUNCOLI & ELIA BONETTI
    GALACTIC ICON VARIANT COVER BY ROD REIS
    • It is time for GRAND MOFF TARKIN to repay a long-standing debt to DARTH VADER…
    • …and settling what is owed will require every last bit of his cunning, and will cost more than he ever imagined.
    32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
    Star Wars © Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Text and illustrations for Star Wars are © 2018 Lucasfilm Ltd.

    [​IMG]
    STAR WARS: POE DAMERON #29
    CHARLES SOULE (W) • Angel Unzueta (A)
    Cover by PHIL NOTO
    • Where were SNAP WEXLEY, JESSIKA PAVA and the rest of BLACK SQUADRON during the events of THE LAST JEDI?
    • Fighting for the very survival of THE RESISTANCE, of course.
    • Now, at last, their story can be told…
    32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
    Star Wars © Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Text and illustrations for Star Wars are © 2018 Lucasfilm Ltd.

    [​IMG]
    STAR WARS: DOCTOR APHRA #22
    SI SPURRIER (W) • KEV WALKER (A)
    Cover by ASHLEY WITTER
    GALACTIC ICON VARIANT COVER BY ROD REIS
    STUCK IN A JUNKYARD JAIL AT WAR. IT CAN’T GET WORSE – RIGHT?
    • I mean, unless you add a vengeful FORCE GHOST. And insane MURDERDROIDS. And a BOR BRAIN-LEECH. And a SENTIENT BIOHAZARD...
    • Surely even rogue archaeologist DOCTOR APHRA can’t find a way to make things even worse.
    • Wrong. Because her current beau and her ex are just about to meet...
    32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
    Star Wars © Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Text and illustrations for Star Wars are © 2018 Lucasfilm Ltd.

    [​IMG]
    STAR WARS: THRAWN #6 (OF 6)
    JODY HOUSER (W) • LUKE ROSS (A)
    Cover by Paul Renaud
    Variant Cover by TBA
    THE RISE OF THE GRAND ADMIRAL
    REACHES ITS CLIMAX!
    • THRAWN at last meets his greatest enemy face-to-face!
    • Will PRYCE’s final gambit to save her family succeed?
    • And what role will ELI VANTO play in Thrawn’s ultimate plan?
    32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
    Star Wars © Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Text and illustrations for Star Wars are © 2018 Lucasfilm Ltd.

    [​IMG]
    STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI ADAPTATION #4 (of 6)
    GARY WHITTA (W) • MICHAEL WALSH (A)
    Cover by RAHZZAH
    Variant Cover by ROD REIS
    AS THE PAST DIES, THE FUTURE BECKONS...
    • REY gambles everything as she heads for a confrontation with KYLO REN and SUPREME LEADER SNOKE.
    • As the fate of the RESISTANCE hangs in the balance, will POE DAMERON risk mutiny to take matters into his own hands?
    • And who is the mysterious visitor coming to offer counsel to LUKE SKYWALKER? (SPOILER ALERT, it’s YODA!)
    32 PGS./Rated T …$3.99
    Star Wars © Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Text and illustrations for Star Wars are © 2018 Lucasfilm Ltd.
     
  3. The Raddinator

    The Raddinator Jedi Padawan star 1

    Registered:
    Dec 18, 2017
    Some really interesting stuff there. So the Poe Dameron comic's re-telling of TFA is only three issues long, and then we are already at the inevitable Black-Squadron-During-TLJ stuff that's obviously been set up since the TLJ Visual Dictionary.

    I've been looking forward to Gillen's plans for SW 50 for a while, although it still seems pretty vague as to what exactly it will be, beyond 'Vader's back' and 'The Bad Guys Win'. Still holding out hope for that Mid-Rim Offensive tie-in...
     
  4. Ancient Whills

    Ancient Whills Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Salvador Larroca again? Oh dear...
     
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  5. iPodwithnomusic

    iPodwithnomusic Jedi Knight star 3

    Registered:
    Nov 23, 2012
    Both Vader issues look very interesting, definitely looking forward to them both. Sounds like Gillen's got a great story for us, too bad the artwork will be terrible.
     
  6. redxavier

    redxavier Jedi Grand Master star 4

    Registered:
    Jan 23, 2003
    On the bright and optimstic side, Issue #51 will be Larroca's 25th consecutive issue for this ongoing; a rather nice round number.
     
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  7. BigAl6ft6

    BigAl6ft6 Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Nov 12, 2012
    I love the pre-ESB period for vintage Star Wars-ing (and they could always go back to it) but getting the book to post ESB period (Lando! Luke becomes more Jedi!) is a fun playground as well. And the book for now has been in the pre-ESB period for more issues than the original Marvel run in the late 70s so, yah, bring on ESB era. Maybe not for 50 issues but definitely a few.
     
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  8. tatooinesandworm

    tatooinesandworm Jedi Knight star 3

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2015
    D@$! It. The bridge issues are RUINED by Larorroca on art. WTF. Worst news of today. Fix this Marvel.


    Sent from my Ornithopter using The Force
     
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  9. vncredleader

    vncredleader Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Mar 28, 2016
    So hyped for the Poe and Aphra issues in particular. Bor Gullet ftw
     
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  10. BigAl6ft6

    BigAl6ft6 Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Nov 12, 2012
    This genius line in the solicits deserves more attention.
     
  11. HeatherAntos

    HeatherAntos Marvel Comics Assistant Editor VIP

    Registered:
    Apr 26, 2016
    You're welcome ;)
     
  12. rjrjr

    rjrjr Jedi Master star 1

    Registered:
    Aug 11, 2009
    With today's decompressed storytelling, they are nowhere close to the same number of stories told in the original Marvel run. If you consider 1 issue back in the 1970s is spread out over 4 issues today (give or take some) we shouldn't be moving into the ESB era until around issue 130 or so. :)

    I think they should look at the time that passed more than how many stories have been told TBH. There is about 3 years between ANH and ESB and we've had at best a years worth of events in the comic.
     
  13. BigAl6ft6

    BigAl6ft6 Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Nov 12, 2012
    Oh while I totally agree you could do probably, like, 300 issues or more of just ANH to ESB stories, I'm talking about comparing the number of issues and years that have passed from Marvel's 70s run to when they got to ESB they were adapting ESB at issue #39, when Star Wars #1 was published in April 1977 (1st issue of ANH adaptation) and #39 was June 1980 which is just about 3 years and 3 months. Star Wars #2 (Volume 2) was published January 2015 which was 3 years and 4 months ago so just comparing the timespan of ANH era comics, it's already gone longer (And has taken up more issues) than the original Marvel run so pretty much due for ESB stuff. I figured #50 would be the ESB flip but they technically aren't even there yet (but I'd bet when this arc ends, it'll be at Hoth).

    What I'm excited for is there really should be an ESB different POV adaptation, it would be kind of odd of the book just flipped to ESB happened in between issues, that would be grand if we get something like that. (kind of like how the Poe Dameron book is adapting Force Awakens, it's kind of strange for the characters in the comic to completely blip over some very pivotal events)
     
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  14. Vthuil

    Vthuil Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jan 3, 2013
    I'm so freakin' tired of having Larroca on issues I'd actually want to read. Please give us a break, Marvel. Hell, give him a break - there's no doubt in my mind that a ton of the art issues come down to time constraints more than anything else and wouldn't be as present if it wasn't one single artist working nonstop.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018
  15. BigAl6ft6

    BigAl6ft6 Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Nov 12, 2012
    I will say about Larroca is that it seems like you're getting a window into a live action Star Wars movie, which I do dig, however sometimes his sourcing for actors and their expressions seem to be a bit off. I actually really liked him on Darth Vader, though, because he has an interesting way of taking inanimate objects and framing them dynamically to get to an emotional core of the shot, which is why he worked so well drawing Vader because Vader is a guy in a suit. Basically whenever there's a lot of technology or aliens with Larroca, it actually works really well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018
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  16. Supreme Leader Woke

    Supreme Leader Woke Jedi Padawan star 1

    Registered:
    Dec 29, 2017
    So there’s the bright side to Larroca’s involvement in issues #50 & #51: one of the OT characters he’s drawing is a guy in a suit.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018
  17. redxavier

    redxavier Jedi Grand Master star 4

    Registered:
    Jan 23, 2003
    I stopped reading Vader pretty quickly because Larroca's Vader doesn't look great. He has him standing awkwardly a lot of the time. Still, better than Larroca's Stormtroopers I suppose.

    Fortunately, despite all my salt over the main ongoing, Marvel are really killing it with the excellent Poe and Thrawn series.
     
  18. starfish

    starfish Jedi Grand Master star 4

    Registered:
    Oct 9, 2003
    That Leia cover for issue 50 is really great.
     
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  19. jamminjedi23

    jamminjedi23 Jedi Master star 5

    Registered:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Very cool news that they are indeed getting close to ESB. I understand how people are saying that they could do about a 150 issues during the ANH era if they wanted to but at the same time we need to remember that there are far, far more stories to tell in Star Wars these days than just stuff between ANH and ESB. They already have four ongoings going now and one (and sometimes two) minis. And soon there will be a thirty year time period opened up for them to start filling with content.

    I imagine the plans are to move this regular Star Wars title into all the different eras instead of just starting up a new book for all the different eras. Looks like we will be getting to ESB sometime within the next six months and then there will just be a little over a year until Ep. IX comes out and they then will be free to start releasing stuff post ROTJ.

    And in regards to Larroca well the comment section shows that his style does have its fans. In the comments of that article there are two people complaining about him and one person saying that he is one of the strongest artists going right now. So even though most everyone hates his style in this small community we have here it doesn't seem like it is proof that the audience as a whole that is buying marvel Star Wars books hates his style (just a portion of them do). And we have five Star Wars books coming out. If this was the only Star Wars book Marvel was putting out having a divisive art style for it would be a bigger deal.
     
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  20. Jedi Ben

    Jedi Ben Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Jul 19, 1999
    I take it you are all aware that this variant cover, which will cost you more money than you can imagine, is by Travis Charest?
     
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  21. Jedi Ben

    Jedi Ben Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Jul 19, 1999
    Star Wars OHC2

    Bagged for a bargain price of £12, this made for a surprisingly good read with a good collection of tales.

    The Annual was quite, quite superb, as was the art. Unzueta is now on the Poe Dameron title, but his art here looked quite natural and free of obvious movie-derived poses and was much better, especially compared to his recent preview pages. The very idea of trying to assassinate the Emperor with a blaster is nuts, but if you thought of him as just a man, it makes perfect sense they'd try it. It all goes disastrously wrong of course, but even there Gillen throws a curveball.

    Rebel Jail was, despite some really excellent Yu artwork, a weaker story. It seems to be a recurring trend in the new material of wanting the heroes to stay true to whatever principles they claim, even when confronted with the most extreme examples which is where they tend to crumble and exceptions apply. This is what happens as it turns out the prisoners the Rebellion have taken are the worst Imperials possible, all arguably meriting a death sentence, which is what the villain of the arc argues for. The story also felt like an episode of the post-Seven of Nine joining Voyager, with Luke and Han being entirely useless which didn't feel right. It also had a sequence to rival the Leia mini's infamous head butt, with Leia KO'ing a guy that looked about three times her size. And then there was the perpetual irritant of Aphra, the only thing that made her barely tolerable was knowing exactly how wrong she was about Vader.

    The Kenobi two-parter was excellent. Great art from Mayhew, neat pick-up from past stories combined with nods to the future.

    Last Voyage of the Harbinger opened with an intro for SCAR squad and then shifted to a full battle between the Rebellion and a Star Destroyer. At the time these issues came out, Molina's art suffered in comparison to his predecessors, but he was up against Cassaday, Immonen, Deodato and Yu! With a couple of years distance and this strange, new art style on a couple of books, it now looks far, far better.

    In plot terms the Han and Leia is dreadful. At best it is a homage to screwball comedy, but it fails to recognise that comedy belongs to a particular time. It does, however, let everyone get a role to play in the story, unlike Rebel Jail. Luke gets a particular good pair of sequences in taking out the reactor and later duelling Kreel.

    Overall, it's no match for the first OHC but it's still a decent enough continuation and collection, especially if you get it cheap.
     
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  22. Dr. Steve Brule

    Dr. Steve Brule Jedi Grand Master star 4

    Registered:
    Sep 7, 2012
    I've been reading back through some of the classic Marvel run. I always thought criticism of stuff like Jaxxon was overblown, but at the same time the Marvels just never really pulled me in all that much. (That being said, I was never a big Marvel fan in general, outside of a few X-Men titles.) Now, for whatever reason, I'm enjoying them a lot. The Shira Brie/Teezle storyline in particular is really well done, and I think (for the most part... Leia is a bit spottier) that most of the movie characters come across as fairly consistent with the movies. And I have to give the crew credit for 'getting' Star Wars - it's impressive not just how it feels like the GFFA despite how out-there some of the stuff gets, but also how much stuff from future EU works (and even the movies) they anticipate.
     
  23. Ancient Whills

    Ancient Whills Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Doctor Aphra Creator Kieron Gillen, Co-Writer Si Spurrier Discuss What’s Next for the Fan Favorite Rogue

    StarWars.com: This is both the start and the end of an era when it comes to Doctor Aphra, who is probably one of the coolest characters in Star Wars right now. Kieron, I want to start by asking how it feels to be handing Aphra off [to Si Spurrier]?

    Kieron Gillen: I was just literally looking at the sales of Aphra this morning; it was the number two trade in February. A completely new character selling that well is shocking in comics. That kind of response is enormously impressive, as it doesn’t happen often. It feels sometimes like she’s mine. Salva[dor Larroca] and I cooked her up but enough people have written her now to make [her] bigger than me. She definitely feels like she’s outgrown me, essentially. [Laughs] So I quite like giving her away to other people who’ll get to play with her. My little girl is all grown up.

    StarWars.com: Si, did you know how popular Aphra was before you started working on this project?

    Si Spurrier: Nope, never heard of her before. No, I jest. I was aware and was delighted and honored to be asked to get involved. The particular beauty and the particular attraction of something like Aphra is that it, at one and the same time, hits all those recognizable IP-shared universe beats, in that we all grew up with Star Wars and we all love that world and we recognize it and we respond to its particular aesthetic and its particular vibe. But at the same time, Aphra is very much in her own funny little niche and off doing her own thing and, yes, occasionally overlapping with stuff in the wider universe in a way that always feels like a cute Easter egg rather than a continuity obstacle. But on the whole, she’s very much the rogue, believe it or not. She’s the rogue element. She’s the thing that allows us as comic creators, especially in a shared universe, to tell very different, very unique stories that you just couldn’t necessarily get away with with any of the more mainstream characters and groups.

    Kieron Gillen: The thing about Aphra for me, I don’t know about you, but for me Aphra is always: what will she do and what won’t she do? You can never be quite sure what she will or won’t do. It’s these moments of horror when she’s going to do that awful thing and there’s also moments when oh no, she’s chosen not to do that thing.

    Si Spurrier: That’s lovely and let’s not be reductive, but there’s an expectation when you look at the big expensive movie stuff we’re so familiar associating Star Wars with, that characters will always do the right thing, that they’ll always hit the right beats, and, not that they’re necessarily predictable, but characters will behave in a way that a character suggests. But one of the many beauties of Aphra is that she does get it wrong. She [messes] up. As Kieron says, she’ll be put in a position where it’s either A or B and, you know, because she’s Aphra, that she’s going to choose A. And then she chooses B. There’s quite a big sort of question mark about Aphra’s specific sexuality…do we have to tread carefully around specific sexual terminology?

    Kieron Gillen: I normally say Aphra’s a lesbian. I’ve never written her with any romantic interest in men. There’s definitely some people who think Vader and Aphra were flirting but I’m not going to get into that.

    Si Spurrier: Literally flirting with disaster.

    Kieron Gillen: I’ve written her primarily romantically interested in women. I think that would be fair to say. Star Wars doesn’t really have the terminology that we do either. One of the things we wrote inside the first arc was that homophobia as we know it doesn’t really exist in the Star Wars universe. No one raises their eyebrow, no one seems surprised when it happens. It’s kind of just something that’s there, so the way that they process sexuality has got to be different anyway, and how they choose to identify, as well.

    StarWars.com: I wanted to go back to the start for Aphra because you’ve talked about how she started as like the dark, mirror version of Indiana Jones. So is Aphra now pretty much how you always envisioned her or did she take on a life of her own at some point, especially given that she survived Vader?

    Kieron Gillen: That Aphra kinda gave birth to her own future. I was pretty sure that I was going to have to kill Aphra, you know? Vader is very good at what he does.

    StarWars.com: Yeah. We expected that you were going to kill Aphra.

    Kieron Gillen: When I looked at that and went, “Wait. Aphra has completely left a way that she can do this.” I completely buy that Vader would fall for that because Vader gets angry. You know what I mean? It’s almost like Aphra planned her own escape for me. That was one moment that she kind of escaped, which is such an Aphra thing to do. The rest of it has always been a process of discovery. Inverse Indiana Jones was kind of the initial call and it always grows because you put it in Star Wars and it changes. What does that even mean in Star Wars? And then you kind of get to the point where she’s very pro people having weapons. Why the hell is she — what’s her take on the Empire? And you start thinking on why she’s adamantly pro-Empire. She completely does not obey the rules of the Empire but she still thinks the Empire is probably a good thing. And at the end of it, there are complexities to her. The more you sit and think and write a character, the more it comes out.

    StarWars.com: Was there anything in particular that surprised you about her?

    Kieron Gillen: I wrote the short story for From a Certain Point of View. That’s kind of when I got to write mostly Aphra’s interiority but working out a fairly logical reason, why with her background, she thinks the Empire is bad to the alternative. If you grew up in a galactic civil war, I think peace by any means might be better than war. That’s kind of Aphra’s take. Aphra can handle everything. She lies to herself. But normal people? Normal people would probably like to live under a fascist regime rather than actually people just killing each other in a war. And that’s a really dark hole to think about but I can buy someone believing that with Aphra’s background. That’s the kind of stuff that surprises you.

    Si Spurrier: Especially since Aphra being Aphra, she has that wonderful little blind spot for herself. She’s like, as you say, “This is absolutely the right thing for the herd but I’m absolutely not part of the herd, so I get to have my own funny little moral code that doesn’t apply to any of this stuff.”

    Kieron Gillen: Yeah, exactly. I’m trying to think about any — there’s always a small beat where something happens and you go, “Yeah, that surprised me.”

    Si Spurrier: There’s actually a bit coming down the pipe in, I think it’s #19, where, without spoiling any of it, somebody basically puts her on the spot about this and there’s some rather lovely stuff she says, which kind of spells out her relationship to conventional morality in as much as she’s aware of it. And it has influence on her, but she doesn’t necessarily go along with it.

    StarWars.com: Why do you think Aphra has resonated with so many people? Obviously I have my own answer for this, but I wanted to hear your take on it.

    Kieron Gillen: Will you say your take after we say ours?

    StarWars.com: Okay, yeah, sure.

    Kieron Gillen: I honestly have no idea. Of all the characters I’ve created for other people’s universes, she’s by far the most successful one. What is it? [Laughs] My thinking with Star Wars is always, “Okay, I’m trying to work out an archetype that I have not seen in Star Wars and give a spin on it.” Dropping an archaeologist in Star Wars makes sense and that she’s morally unpredictable, that makes sense, as well. She’s kind of fun but at the same time, there’s a really dark heart to her. Those kinds of things. All those weird kind of contradictions to her, I think they’re quite appealing. At the same time, she’s got a very core thing people can get. She’s quite complicated and not complicated at all. With Luke or Leia, they’ve got that core archetype you get, you get what they’re like. You get that with Aphra but at the same time, there’s an underlying…all this weird, twisted stuff in there that kind of gets under people’s skin. I think.

    Si Spurrier: I would say for me that there’s this funny thing when you look at Star Wars as a big, overarching [intellectual property] that as consumers, as geeks, we find ourselves uncomfortably drawn for a multitude of reasons to the wrong characters. There’s a reason that Vader is amazingly popular, and it’s probably because he’s such an incredible design, an incredible icon. There’s a reason that people love to cosplay as stormtroopers and maybe it’s the same. Maybe it’s because it’s such a great costume, it’s a sense of partaking in this incredible, visual world. But these are space fascists. And then you get Aphra and she’s all of those things that are problematic, but there’s also just this tiny, probably doomed, forlorn glimmer of redemption precisely because she’s smart enough that she understands conventional morality. She knows that Vader is probably not a nice person. She’s aware that space fascism is not necessarily a good thing but it may be the right thing for a chaotic universe, and so she’s sort of able to navigate all of these… The better way of putting it is that most of what we’ve seen so far in Star Wars is goodies versus baddies. And Aphra ain’t that. And I would suggest that the reason people respond — I’m generalizing, but the reason people respond more to Han Solo than they respond to Luke Skywalker is because he’s not just playing the goodie. He’s a little more complicated than that. And Aphra is 100% the same but from the other direction, if that makes sense. That’s my feeling anyway.

    Kieron Gillen: In my head, I’ve got a list of ethical grayness in the Star Wars universe. You’ve got Han Solo who’s here, and slightly more gray, you’ve got Sana, and even more gray, you have Aphra. I’ve got this graph of rogueness.

    Si Spurrier: Rogueosity?

    Kieron Gillen: Rogueosity. The one thing we should mention is design. If Salva hadn’t given Aphra the design, I don’t think it would have worked. It’s a visual medium. If I think, “Oh, they look like an interesting person…” You know what I mean?

    Si Spurrier: This feels like a really good segue into us asking Bria why she’s so fond of Aphra.

    Kieron Gillen: Yes!

    StarWars.com: [Laughs] This gets turned around. Well, funny you mention Salva’s design because I know for me that as a half-Asian woman, Aphra was probably the first time I looked at a Star Wars comic and went, “Oh. I can see myself in there.” And plus, everything you guys said before about how she has that sass to her, she doesn’t always do the right thing. Like exploding tookas: probably not the right thing to do.

    Kieron Gillen: That was Si’s idea.

    StarWars.com: It was fantastic. It’s been very cool for me to see a character who kind of looks like me, who I can costume as, who I can run around and sass Darth Vader as, and she’s been fun and she’s been someone I latched onto as soon as I saw the cover of Vader #3.

    Kieron Gillen: You can’t overstate the importance of representation. That’s one of the many things that makes her a modern kind of Star Wars character. It’s great to have representation and at the same time, she’s not exactly a role model, I guess? In that people can be anything in the Star Wars universe. We’ve got this — Yes, Bria, I agree with you entirely.

    StarWars.com: Good, I’m glad to hear that. So shifting a little bit… Aphra’s beach vacation, which lasted for all of like two panels. How did she end up finding herself in this particular predicament with Triple Zero? Is that something we’re probably going to find out a little later down the line or…?

    Si Spurrier: The way that we chose to play it is that when Aphra ended up on the beach, the one loose end was the secret of her continued existence and Triple Zero knows it. Triple Zero being Triple Zero, he’s going to use whatever leverage he can to get whatever he wants, so we kind of assumed in as much as — and by the way, there’s a whole bunch of these loose ends being tied up, or at least revisited, a little bit later down the line. And so a lot of these questions are, if not underlined and answered, at least sort of massaged, frankly. But yes, I think that it was assumed that we didn’t need to lean into this whole moment Triple Zero shows up and goes, “Ah! I know your dark secret!” because that’s obviously what he would do if he knew your dark secret.

    Kieron Gillen: I just imagine Aphra in bed one day and waking up with Triple Zero and BT in the room. And Triple Zero’s like, “You’ll come with me now.”

    StarWars.com: That’s horrifying.

    Kieron Gillen: As Si said, it doesn’t seem as interesting. He would have turned up, applied leverage, and she crumbles. That’s basically what would have happened and doing it would have felt like dead space.

    StarWars.com: Well, I guess the question has to be: Does Aphra think it was worth it to free the murder droids? Is that something she would do again?

    Si Spurrier: I have to be… It’s one of these careful of spoilers things. I guess what I can say is that in issue 19, which is the end of the “Remastered” arc, there’s a page where the whole thing is re-contextualized. It shows that everything that you — all the reasons you think things are happening are not necessarily the reasons things are happening. That will give you a far better sense of Triple Zero in particular, and to answer your question, would probably leave Aphra very much in the “no oh god never again never again oh god no” sort of mold. Except, the caveat, as we were saying in the beginning of this interview, she’s very good at [messing] up so you never know. She might very well make the same mistake twice.

    Kieron Gillen: Her back was against the wall. What was her option except doing it? She was on a base with Darth Vader and Triple Zero would have told him. She didn’t really have much room and Triple Zero definitely kind of manipulated her. But would you rather not do it? The thing is, where I would go is if you could go all the way back to “Why on earth did I break the Triple Zero matrix out anyway?” It’d literally been quarantined. I think that’s the mistake she would end up regretting, but then part of it’s like she knows she’d make exactly the same mistake again as well.

    StarWars.com: The current arc “Remastered” has been co-written by both of you. What has that collaboration process been like?

    Kieron Gillen: It’s been good. When Si was still living in my neck of the woods, we went to the pub and co-plotted it. I had the idea of what the second year would be about, which is Triple Zero is Aphra’s master and we deal with that. We cooked up the structure and that kind of thing. We didn’t exactly break it down into episodes, I think? Or maybe we did but broadly. I wrote the first episode and Si was going to be writing the other ones. We thought about alternating issues so I would do the last one, but Si’s been scripting like this frenzied maniac and it’s like no, I can’t write this last episode because it felt like Si had to do the ending, you know what I mean? Me stepping in, doing my area, it was like, “No, I think Si needs to script it,” and at the same time, I’m looking at scripts and tweaking stuff. That’s kind of the co-writing. We co-plotted it together, I wrote an episode, Si’s kinda the main script writer, and I offer help where I can. That’s kinda how it works, isn’t it, Si?

    Si Spurrier: Yeah very much so. We made a bit of a road for him back because the “Remastered” arc is so plotty. And there’s so much — and that needn’t always be a bad thing but it does create difficulties in as much as all the threads have to be tied together in a very specific way so, as Kieron says, by the time we got to that last issue, I was kind of holding a big bundle of threads and it didn’t feel quite right to be passing them back off again.

    Kieron Gillen: Basically, I thought it was too hard. [Laughs]

    Si Spurrier: [Laughs] That’s what we’re edging around.

    Kieron Gillen: It’s true. There’s really emotional scenes at the end of that arc and I think that kind of pay off? That’s the dessert, that kind of fun stuff, and Si gets to eat the dessert as well.

    Si Spurrier: Very tasty dessert it is, too.

    StarWars.com: Tolvan’s obviously back in a very big way. When she first appeared in the first Doctor Aphra arc, was it always the plan for her to return and… I don’t know how else to phrase this, so… Are she and Aphra for real?

    Kieron Gillen: When I invented Tolvan, I was explicitly thinking… This hard-bitten, kind of very serious kind of person chasing down this more whimsical person and the sexual tension. That was the thing. I wanted to have this sexual tension between the person being pursued and the person who is doing the pursing. And, of course, the flip of it is, Aphra’s the person who’s also pursuing Tolvan. Kind of like, I want to arrest you but also I’m crushing on the person trying to arrest me. That struck me as a really cool dynamic. When I was thinking it up, that was definitely a plot I’d like to do. So I’m glad it’s working.

    StarWars.com: Speaking of strong woman, we talked earlier about the little Easter eggs and connections that come in, so I’d say that Hera Syndulla is one of those. She was in #17 and #18. Where did the idea to bring her in come from?

    Si Spurrier: This is one of those unforeseen, fortuitous moments. We knew that for the purposes of the plot that we needed a high-ranking rebel general and we were quite happy to just invent one, but every time you submit a Star Wars script to Marvel it not only goes to the Marvel editors who are extremely helpful, but it then gets passed on to the Story Group over at Lucas[film]. They’re very good at not only saying, “You can’t do this,” but also, “Hey, wouldn’t it be cool if you did this?” They pointed out that the [Star Wars] Rebels show was coming to an end and they reminded us that there is a clever little name drop in Rogue One where you just hear General Syndulla’s name mentioned in a loud speaker announcement in the background, which is a sort of wonderful thing that Star Wars can do. It’s all these Easter eggs, but they’re never hurdles. So the fans knew that Syndulla survived beyond the end of Rebels. They knew that she was around at this rough time period that Aphra’s set in, so it all kind of meshed together and we got Space Mummy as the flight instructor at the rebel flight school and Aphra comes along. It’s the sort of wonderful thing you can do with a desperately screwed up and unpredictable woman character bashing into a beloved Space Mummy. You get two very, very different female archetypes striking sparks off of one another. It’s been really cool.

    Kieron Gillen: The story gets really good like that. Si’s newer to writing Star Wars than I am but you’re right about the hand with which they give back, and there’s definitely points when I hand in a script — and I do the research, obviously — but I ask if there’s anyone available who might be fun to use if it’s a role that doesn’t need to be someone. Is there anything useful I can use here, like a tiny nod? I knew that I needed a rival for Vader who was running the military in my Vader run and they suggested, “Well, Tagge could have survived the Death Star.” He’s available as a kind of light villain. He was basically like one of the backbones of the Vader book. I’m doing a nod towards — in the latest issue of Star Wars, they mention training rebel pilots so I’m sort of crossing over with Aphra, as well. All of this stuff feeds back into itself as well.

    Si Spurrier: It’s funny you say that. I’ve just been writing the latest Aphra Annual and I too have received a bunch of strange notes from the Story Group, many of them which add a great deal of stuff to the story, but there’s these funny moments when they’ll say, “Oh, you can’t do that.” And there’s no explanation for why you can’t do something, which seems very, very innocent, except that you’re immediately thinking, “Aha! Something like that is coming down the pipe in the next movie,” so you’ve always got this sort of half-prediction going on about what’s coming up next.

    Kieron Gillen: It’s like playing Battleships. You work out what the plot of the movie is by the stuff you’ve been told no.

    Si Spurrier: What you can’t do, not what you can do.

    Kieron Gillen: It makes watching the movies a weird experience. Like when I was watching Rogue One, there were a couple bits I just laughed at and I was the only person in the cinema who laughed, because of course I knew what I’d been told no for something like two years ago. I initially suggested having [Voidgazer] in the Death Star gunner outfit because it’s a great outfit and using that would be really cool, and I was basically told, “No, you can’t do that. Hard no.” And of course you get to the bit when Jyn uses it as a disguise. It’s this very very minor no, but “Ohhhh, now it makes sense.”

    StarWars.com: Shifting topics a little bit, how does it feel for both of you to see the ever-growing legion of Aphra cosplayers out there?

    Kieron Gillen: It’s delightful. I mean, it’s good, isn’t it? Any time anyone dresses as any of your characters is great because it means they — obviously, the amount of craft that people put into it. I think someone actually has the Aphra tattoo. Now that’s amazing.

    Si Spurrier: That’s something coming down the pipe as well… An actual use of the electric tattoos serving some function. Yeah, to answer your question, it’s always astonishing. I think it was Wil Wheaton who said cosplay is the purest expression of fandom that one can conceive of because you’re literally borrowing a character’s skin. I think that’s wonderful. There’s nothing better than seeing a character you created, so Kieron gets the biggest smile for that, but the character you are working with coming to life in front of you, that’s a hell of a moment.

    StarWars.com: Are there any of the Aphra outfits that you particularly want to see brought to life? I ask this of course with no ulterior motive.

    Kieron Gillen: Some of the stuff that Kevin [Walker]’s doing in the next arc. I love all the suits. The character should change according to their environment. Kevin’s very big on that.

    Si Spurrier: The next arc is set in an Imperial prison but it’s a very unique one that’s… without going too far into it, it’s kind of open to space and so it’s bloody cold, and so all of the prisoners are wearing quite heavy kind of spacey gear. So, presumably, Aphra’s still got her usual duds on under there somewhere, but she’s wearing a lot of padding and a few bits and bobs of scavenged Imperial gear. So, yeah, as Kieron says, Kevin has really leaned in to designing the functionality of the look and it looks cracking as a result. That’ll be exciting if anybody tries to do that, because it’s a big outfit.

    StarWars.com: Oh boy. I was going to ask if you’d specifically asked any of the amazing artists, like Kevin, working on the book to routinely give us new challenges for costuming.

    Si Spurrier: I think we’ll start to see a lot more Tolvans, as well, because that’s a very cool look. We now live in an age of comics where comic artists and characters designers are increasingly thinking about cosplay when they create a character because it’s sort of lovely to see something come to life.

    Kieron Gillen: Jamie [McKelvie] says, “I’d like to see them try and do this one!” The level of skill in the community is astounding. When people come up — it’s an incredibly pure expression of fandom but at the same time, it’s an art.

    StarWars.com: I can say as one of the Aphra cosplayers — I think I was one of the first half dozen or so — it’s been a fun challenge at times specially with the tattoos. So we sort of have an idea, but what’s next for the not-so-good doctor?

    Si Spurrier: Next arc is called “Broken Inside.” Aphra is in a particularly unique Imperial prison where she’s being forced to fight on behalf of the Empire along with her fellow prisoners. I won’t spoil where the story goes, as it goes in slightly unusual directions, but the kind of opening crisis for her is that she should be able to escape. She’s got lots of means and loose threads, which should allow her to escape. It rather involves her leaning on an awful lot of favors that she’s got floating around outside the prison. Every time she thinks she’s found a way to escape, either something — or more commonly, she causes it to go wrong because stuff is going on in the prison, too. It’s a sort of far darker, not quite so slapstick arc, which nonetheless has a lot of dark comedy beating around it. There’s one very, very big secret lurking at the center of this prison, which hopefully should really impress the crowd.

    Kieron Gillen: When we were doing the plan, the thing that kind of draws the characters together is one of those… Aphra surprises you. It’s one of those beats where that’s a cold and weird move Aphra’s just done.

    Si Spurrier: The start of #21, I think…

    Kieron Gillen: Si’s writing the script again, but that’s one of those scenes I would’ve loved to write. It’s really meaty and awful.

    Si Spurrier: To give you a little sort of unfair teaser, the end of issue #20, in the midst of this hellish prison environment, Aphra gets the chance to make a phone call or a Star Wars equivalent of a phone call. And the question is, if you had one call for somebody out there, given who you are Doctor Aphra, somebody who doesn’t tend to inspire loyalty in the people around you — if you had one call and it was to try and get somebody to come and get you, to come and help you, to get you out of there, who would you call? The first part of the arc kicks off from there.

    StarWars.com: I have a theory.

    Kieron Gillen: Who do you think, Bria?

    StarWars.com: It’s Sana. It has to be.

    Kieron Gillen and Si Spurrier: Mm, yeah…

    Si Spurrier: We’ll see.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2018
  24. Dr. Steve Brule

    Dr. Steve Brule Jedi Grand Master star 4

    Registered:
    Sep 7, 2012
    I just saw a "Tag & Bink Were Here #1" on the solicits for this week... is Marvel doing a new Tag & Bink or is this just a reprint of the old Dark Horse collection?
     
  25. spicer

    spicer Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Reprint. Most likely because of the inclusion of the characters in Solo.