New Esquire magazine article:"Spielberg vs. Lucas"

Discussion in 'Lucasfilm Ltd. In-Depth Discussion' started by waheennay, May 14, 2004.

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  1. J-Solo Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 6, 1999
    star 4
    I disagree. A.I. is a LOT more than just "popcorn". I confess that I HATE the ending of the movie; Spielberg should have ended it when David was underwater, asking the Blue Fairy to become a real boy. But the rest of the film is very, very good, and it raises a lot of intriguing questions. Can a robot love? And, if so, what's the responsability we have towards it? Jude Law is simply perfect as Gigolo Joe, a male robot prostitute (in a Spielberg film, amazing), and David's quest for his creator is really interesting and thought provoquing.

    I wouldn't call Minority Report just a "popcorn" movie either. The opening of the film shows how Spielberg is a master of his game. We see, at the same time, the couple having breakfast, the pre-cogs predicting the future murder and Tom Cruise trying to discover where it's going to happen. It's fantastic. The whole rest of the film is very, very good. I love the way Cruise's character and Agatha run away from the cops, with Agatha predicting the future almost step by step. When she asks him to pick the umbrella nobody knows why, and a few moments later it's pure magic.

    You forgot to talk about "Catch me if you Can", a highly stylish action/comedy film with Tom Hanks and Leo DiCaprio. The film flows almost flawlessly. Even DiCaprio is great in this film, playing a seventeen-year-old kid who can impersonates anybody and steals a lot of money. Great film.

    "He's frightened to death by the thought of making a film the audience don't like or that gets bad reviews...thus he makes compromizes a real filmmaker should not do (George Lucas don't)...

    That's just plain ridiculous. Lucas is the master of compromises. And it's him who makes everything for money. He didn't make the SE because "he wanted the films to be truer to his vision". He made them for MONEY. So he could start the machine all over again, and sell "new" VHS tapes, "new" packs", "new" DVD's, "new" soundtrack cd's, and so on. He knows that people like you buy anything with the Star Wars logo on it, so he just keeps recycling old stuff and get even richer, if that's possible. And his prequels are just so weak, the scripts so simple an uninspired that it's a shame they have the Star Wars name on them.
  2. WEEBACCA Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2004
    star 4
    I disagree. A.I. is a LOT more than just "popcorn". I confess that I HATE the ending of the movie; But the rest of the film is very, very good, and it raises a lot of intriguing questions.

    Yes, the film raises a lot of intriguing questions, however A.I was originally a Stanley Kubrick project that he wanted to make himself, only he died before he was able to. Instead Spielberg takes over; adds a touch of Disney, tunes down the whole prostitute/love theme to get the rating right, and adds the the most terrible ending ever!!! (I totally agree with you it should have ended with David underwater)!!! Kubrick's genious ideas are totally ruined by that comercial coward Spielberg!!
    RESULT: A stanley Kubrick project with the potential to be an important film is made into a Disney feature by Spielberg only a some of Kubricks ideas are still left in some way thus making you believe that there's something great or intellectual about this film!!!

    I wouldn't call Minority Report just a "popcorn" movie either. The opening of the film shows how Spielberg is a master of his game.

    Of course the film is not badly directed, Spielberg doesn't direct bad 'cause he never takes chances, he doesn't dare to...result is he doesn't evolve much as a director...this film has just the same standard "Spielberg-quality" we always see from him!
    Minority Report is based upon a short story by Phillip K. Dick who deals with identity/human value in a modern "big brother" society. The film touches these themes, but puts them more in the background while Spielberg drowns them in action,chase-scenes,F/X and a polished, sterile visual look, giving it a treatment that does not do justice to how serious and important this film's potential is!

    When she asks him to pick the umbrella nobody knows why, and a few moments later it's pure magic.

    You should probably thank Scott Frank and John Cohen who wrote the script then... :)

    That's just plain ridiculous. Lucas is the master of compromises. And it's him who makes everything for money. He didn't make the SE because "he wanted the films to be truer to his vision". He made them for MONEY.

    Yeah, I believe that to be partly true! George Lucas needed money to make Episode I, but he also did it to test out CGI with the prequels in mind, but he also did it to make it closer to his own vision, to make them fit more with the prequels in F/X, and because he would have to restore the prints anyway or they would have been ruined forever, and because he wanted to introduce new audiences to the films!!!


  3. trooperTK421 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Dec 3, 2003
    star 1
    Yea,Spielberg would NEVER cg enhance one of his earlier films and then re-release it for the 20th anniversary *cough* E.T.*cough*.The difference between the two is that the re-release of E.T. was a failure at the box office and SW wasn't.Lucas is one of my favs.Is he the best director? Probably not. But he is an influencial filmmaker that quite a few big name filmmakers admire.He's helped out on quite a few films without being credited.Lucas makes HIS movies on HIS terms.He doesn't answer to anybody.He could give a rat's A** about what critics,media and discruntled fans think of his movies.He makes them how he wants to make them.As far as Lucas re-releasing video's or whatever,he's not holding a gun to your head, forcing you to buy them.If it was all about $$$,we would've seen multiple dvd releases,movie re-releases every couple of years and so on.That's not the case.He doesn't need your money.
  4. malducin Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 23, 2001
    star 4
    The truth is; he doesn't dare to take chances, the doesn't dare to make important films any longer... He's frightened to death by the thought of making a film the audience don't like or that gets bad reviews...thus he makes compromizes a real filmmaker should not do

    I totally disagree. Spielberg is so powerful he can make any film he damn pleases and no one would say no. And he does important films and th 2 examples you gave are perfect examples.

    A.I. is a LOT more than just "popcorn". I confess that I HATE the ending of the movie; Spielberg should have ended it when David was underwater, asking the Blue Fairy to become a real boy.

    The ending inthe frozen far future was actually in Kubrick's drafts and script and he had concept art done for it. If anything Spielberg is just guilty of following Kubrick's plan. Besides that ending adds a lot and is even more poignant, all of humanity dead. Even with what the supermechas did, did David really "grow" beyond his initial programming. It's a very tragic ending, even more than just finishing at the bottom of the ocean.

    Instead of using this potential Spielberg turns them into "polished", commercial and totally unimportant films!!! ... I wouldn't call Minority Report just a "popcorn" movie either.

    I agree and the brilliance comes from keeping the Philip K. Dick ambiguity bu a lot of people miss the subtext for just the action. You can interpret the ending both ways, remember that line by Tim Blake Nelson when Cruise is put on the Containment Hall? "They dream their lives turn out OK".

    He didn't make the SE because "he wanted the films to be truer to his vision". He made them for MONEY.

    Well I would say it's he did them for his new vision, mainly the political correctness and because they are considered children's classics, as opposed to movies for teens but that can please both sides of the spectrum. As far as the money, well he is an independent director (after all he quit the DGA for quite a while) so you can't certainly blame him for doing money to finance his other endeavors, many which include non-profit work like the George Lucas Educational Foundation, support ofr USC's film school and being able to finance his own projects.

    In the end you get to choose what to spend money on, you don't have to be every piece of merchandise to prove you are the biggest fan.

    however A.I was originally a Stanley Kubrick project that he wanted to make himself, only he died before he was able to.

    Before he died he actually gave it to Spielberg. Kubrick himself didn't think in the end he would be the best director for it. It was printed somewhere, Premiere magazine or something like that.

    adds a touch of Disney, tunes down the whole prostitute/love theme to get the rating right, and adds the the most terrible ending ever!!! ... Kubrick's genious ideas are totally ruined by that comercial coward Spielberg!! ... only a some of Kubricks ideas are still left in some way thus making you believe that there's something great or intellectual about this film!!!

    Heck most of Kubricks ideas are in the film. What's so bad about the ending. Besides if he commercialized, how come it was a flop? If anything people thought thye film would be something "classic" like E.T. instead they got a thought provoking drama. There is nothing happy or commercial about the ending, it almost plays put like stuff you see on independent movies.

    Spielberg doesn't direct bad 'cause he never takes chances,

    I guess you haven't seen many Spielberg films like Schindler's List or the Color Purple.
    Kubrick, his wife and estate, plus all the printed stories and reports about the project would disagree with that assesment.

    and because he would have to restore the prints anyway or they would have been ruined forever, and because he wanted to introduce new audiences to the films!!!

    I agree with introducing new audiences to the films, but the stuff about the prints are in contradiction. We've heard from Jim Ward of Lucasfilm officially
  5. WEEBACCA Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2004
    star 4
    I totally disagree. Spielberg is so powerful he can make any film he damn pleases and no one would say no.

    My point exactly; he's so rich and powerful that he should take some chances, be a more daring filmmaker; he should not hide what he truly wants to say with the film by drowning us with F/X and other "popcorn"-elements! Personally, I think he has become a coward; he doesn't dare to be a true artist any longer; too afraid of movie critics and popcorn-hungry audience...
    Of course there could be another possibility; maybe he doesn't know how to do it...

    The ending inthe frozen far future was actually in Kubrick's drafts and script and he had concept art done for it. If anything Spielberg is just guilty of following Kubrick's plan.

    Okay,so that's true, but you can be quite sure Kubrick didn't mean for him to turn it into a "Disney"-film. Spielberg interpreted those drafts and scripts just the way he wanted to himself. From all I've seen from Kubrick he doesn't think along the same childlike "disney"-way lines as Spielberg does, and I'm pretty sure Kubrick didn't mean for it to turn out this way... He probably spins around in his grave...

    Before he died he actually gave it to Spielberg. Kubrick himself didn't think in the end he would be the best director for it.

    Well, he did the mistake of his life! He should have given it to someone else... Personally I reckon he gave it to Spielberg because he knew Spielberg to be one of the few people in a position where he could finance it even if it it wasn't a very commercial, but instead Spielberg goes for a compromise, trying to make it both commercial and "important"(In lack of a better word)... Big mistake! He should have made up his mind for one way to go...

    And he does important films and th 2 examples you gave are perfect examples.

    Minority Report and A.I. are perfect examples of potentially important films...the problem is; Spielberg goes for a compromise, trying to make them both important films and commercial...what he ends up with is films that are not nearly fulfilling their potential to be important... Of course it you compare them to films like American Pie or Scary Movie 3 then they are important...

    I guess you haven't seen many Spielberg films like Schindler's List or the Color Purple.

    I'm a huge fan of Spielberg and I have of course seen the films you mentioned. I'm sorry if you got me wrong, I was referring to Spielberg's career the last decade (after Schindler's List)...In the years since he made the genious Schindler's List he's been pretty predictable as a director, not taking any chances and always delivered his usual "Spielberg-quality", meaning he never makes bad films, but nothing extraordinary... I only wish that would change... *sigh* :(




  6. J-Solo Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 6, 1999
    star 4
    What do you call an "important" film? The Phanton Menace? That's not an FX filled, popcorn movie?!?
  7. WEEBACCA Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2004
    star 4
    What do you call an "important" film? The Phanton Menace? That's not an FX filled, popcorn movie?!?

    George Lucas made it for 9 year old kids! F/X and popcorn is what's important for nine year old kids, J-Solo...Besides, TPM's main importance is to explain the backstory of the other SW films that have more "important" themes to deal with, it holds no importance of its own but in context with the other SW films...
  8. J-Solo Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 6, 1999
    star 4
    Yeah, but you can't have it both ways. Either Lucas is "an important, bold filmamer" who doesn't make films to please anyone or he is a guy who makes films to please nine-year-old kids. I don't think your argument holds very well.
  9. Obi_Frans Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2003
    star 4
    This thread proves something...

    ...here we have 2 of the most creative minds in the filom industry (who happen to be close friends) and instead of praising them both theres instant division instead.

    Why ?, all because some reporter decided a "Lucas vs Spielberg" headline would raise some attention and earn him something.

    Funny...
  10. WEEBACCA Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2004
    star 4
    Yeah, but you can't have it both ways. Either Lucas is "an important, bold filmamer" who doesn't make films to please anyone or he is a guy who makes films to please nine-year-old kids. I don't think your argument holds very well.

    Of course I can have it both ways!! George Lucas is a filmmaker who makes both "important" and political films that really forces you to think and reflect like e.g. THX 1138 and some of his short films, plus he makes more entertaining films like American Grafitti and Star Wars that still has depth and touch important themes plus shows some real groundbraking directing, and he also makes some more superficial entertaining "popcorn" films like e.g. The Phantom Menace and the Indiana Jones trilogy......

    here we have 2 of the most creative minds in the filom industry (who happen to be close friends) and instead of praising them both theres instant division instead

    I guess you've got a point there, Obi-Frans... :)
    But when people around here says that George Lucas isn't even a real filmmaker, one has to take affair you know...

  11. Emos-Edud Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 29, 2002
    star 4
    Kubrick wanted Spielberg to direct.

    The ending is not cheesy or Disney. If you look beneath the surface, it is in fact the most depressing ending Spielberg has ever shot. Fake boy, fake mom, fake room. Is the little boy's emotion even real? The mechanical descendants of man watch as man's greatest creation falls asleep hoping that his mother might live another day. We know she will not. Is he crazy or is he human?
  12. TheLostTrilogy Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Lucas does not take chances. Half the PT is mostely "parallels" and "rhymes" to the OT.

    Georgey boy is also not a great director, how can somone be one when you take a 20+ year break from doing it. He supposedely loves doing it but so far he has made only 5 movies in 30 or more years.

    Speilburg even put both versions of ET on the DVD release. While Lucas is being a self centered **** and leaving us with onlt the butchered special (extra special?) editions. People did not fall in love with Star Wars version 7.9 they fell in love with the origonal movies as they were released.

    Well that's my opinion on the differences between Lucas and Spelbierg, now let the flaming begin.
  13. WEEBACCA Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2004
    star 4
    Lucas does not take chances. Half the PT is mostely "parallels" and "rhymes" to the OT.

    Yes, he has indeed not taken any chances on the PT because it is supposed to blend in with the OT as far as possible when it comes to directorial style. The new technology and F/X makes the PT look different enough as it is from the look of the OT, but if Lucas had done something radically different when it comes to directorial style the differences would just have been too great. Good thing he did it the way he did instead of trying to pleas the movie critics or the Academy Award commitee!!

    Apart from the prequels, George Lucas has been an extremely daring and groundbraking director; THX 1138 was extremely experimental and Warner Bros hated him for making it (resulting in them pulling out of American Zoetrope).
    This did not prevent Lucas from making yet another experimental film; American Grafitti, the first film ever to have multiple storylines. The way the characters and plot is presented and driven forward was extremely unusual, and extremely successfull, today this has become a standard in filmmaking worldwide! It also earned Lucas his first Oscar nomination for Best Director!
    After this he made Star Wars, yet another film showing off Lucas brilliant control of the medium. It has a structure when it comes to cuts and transitions and the build up of scenes that was highly unusual and radical back in 1977, but extremely successfull and also earned Lucas yet another Oscar nomination for Best Director!

    So don't you dare saying George Lucas is not a director who takes chances!! :mad:

    Speilburg even put both versions of ET on the DVD release. While Lucas is being a self centered **** and leaving us with onlt the butchered special (extra special?) editions.

    Yes I wish that Lucas would put both versions on the DVD, I'm extremely disappointed that he didn't, but what Spielberg did was first releasing just the special editidon, then 6 months later or so he released the edition with both versions on them, talk about money-grabbing freak!! (Really more of a comment on one of the earlier discussions in this thread about Lucas being more money-grabbing than Spielberg wich is of course not the case)

    Georgey boy is also not a great director, how can somone be one when you take a 20+ year break from doing it.

    I've already explained what a great director he is! And the years has no real signinficance! He has been involved with making movies in most of those years as a Producer and screenwriter, so he hasn't stopped thinking like a filmmaker, it's in his blood... :)
  14. TheLostTrilogy Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Ok you have your opinion ill have mine. Now we both win.
  15. J-Solo Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 6, 1999
    star 4
    Apart from the prequels, George Lucas has been an extremely daring and groundbraking director;

    So, let's see...he directed 6 films so far (including Episode III), and half of them are not daring, according to your own words. Nice. ;)

    American Grafitti, the first film ever to have multiple storylines.

    Now that's a bold statement. The first ever? I seriously doubt it. "Multiple storylines" (and paralell editing) existed since the days of D.W. Grifith, in the silent era.

    After this he made Star Wars, yet another film showing off Lucas brilliant control of the medium. It has a structure when it comes to cuts and transitions and the build up of scenes that was highly unusual and radical back in 1977, but extremely successfull and also earned Lucas yet another Oscar nomination for Best Director!

    Sorry to disappoint you, but Star Wars has nothing new when it comes to editing. The film is entirely based upon adventure serials from the past, Kurosawa movies and war movies. In fact, the attack to the Death Star was copied almost shot by shot from previous war movies. The famous "wipe transitions" were taken from movie serials too.

    So don't you dare saying George Lucas is not a director who takes chances!!

    Well, all that is left is THX 1138. But since you accused Spielberg of living from his past sucess, I guess we have to cut that out too.

    Of course you disagree.
  16. WEEBACCA Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2004
    star 4
    So, let's see...he directed 6 films so far (including Episode III), and half of them are not daring, according to your own words. Nice.

    He has directed 5 films (I don't include films that have not yet come out even if I don't expect much from Epi III that is), but I would also like to include his short films which I've seen a few of, they are also brilliantly crafted and groundbreaking. Anyway, this means that we've got two films not daring; TPM and AOTC, but they were also meant not to be daring...

    Now that's a bold statement. The first ever? I seriously doubt it.

    Actually, that's true! I've majored in film history and it says so in both my history book, plus in the George Lucas companion and George Lucas Interviws that American Grafitti is the first film to have multiple storylines! I doubt all my books and teachers are wrong about that!
    (I'm of course not talking about paralell editing, that's been the norm almost ever since Birth of a Nation first introduced it after all...)

    Sorry to disappoint you, but Star Wars has nothing new when it comes to editing.

    Sorry, I was not really talking about the editing in itself, but the unusual transitions and presentation of scenes, people didn't direct films like this back then. (I'm really sorry that I lack a way of explaining this better, but my english is not very good I'm afraid)
    It's also because it's so groundbreaking that it is #15 on AFI's 100 best American movies list, you don't get that good ranking on that list just by being a perfect film.
    btw. For your information; American Grafitti is of course also on that list.

    the attack to the Death Star was copied almost shot by shot from previous war movies. The famous "wipe transitions" were taken from movie serials too.

    I know that very well, J-Solo, I've seen a shot by shot comparison of the two films, but as I've explained I'm not talking about editing as much as directing here, and I did not mean transitions like wipes and dissolves of course...

    Well, all that is left is THX 1138. But since you accused Spielberg of living from his past sucess, I guess we have to cut that out too.

    Well, now I have explained that he has three daring and groundbreaking films plus a number of shorts, so I think it's time for you to admit that he has been a really great and groundbraking director in the past, and then I'll admit he has been dissappointing in his last films...
    ...plus I'll have to admit that I watched A.I again on Saturday (hadn't seen it for about two years before that) and I have to say that I had forgotten how well it's directed, Spielbergs script is what makes the film suck I now believe (but I still have the same feelings towards Minority Report and Catch Me if You Can...)

    Of course you disagree.

    Of course I do, J-Solo! :D







  17. waheennay Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 29, 2000
    star 4
    I think Spielberg and Lucas have very different attitudes to their audiences. Spielberg almost always wants to please his audience and make them happy. Sometimes this is a good thing, sometimes it's bad. He'll never ever make a totally dark and depressing movie. Even Schindler's List had a happy ending. Lucas never wanted to make a commercial movie. He started out making abstract movies and wasn't interested at all in entertaining audiences. He made American Graffiti to prove to his friends he could make a warm film. Even though the whole world went crazy for the first Star Wars and loved it he was still bugged by how it didn't fit his vision.
  18. Clear_Water Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 25, 2004
    star 1
    Wow this has the makings of the BIGGEST flame war ever!!

    My 2cents :

    Spielberg: More conventional
    Lucas: Less conventional

    They both love cinema & are both real directors.

    Lucas is going through the same thing that Fellini did in the 2nd half of his career, "Why doesn't he make simple, fun, pleasing movies like he used to? What's with all the big production values, confusing storylines & wierd performances?" In 20 years people will appreciate the beauty & complexity of the later Lucas films just as they do the late Fellini films today (and they were shalaqued as bad as Lucas's).
  19. VerbalKint1288 Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Weebacca:

    Saying that American Graffiti is the first film with multiple storylines is ridiculous. I don't know where you read this. Here's some pre-American Graffiti films with multiple storylines.

    The Bridge on the River Kwai
    The Longest Day
    Tora! Tora! Tora!
    M*A*S*H
    Amarcord (made around the same time as Graffiti)

    Personally, I would argue that A.I. isn't commercial in the slightest, while Lucas gets more commercial with everything he does. Which is more commercial, a black and white, 3 and a half hour film about the Holocaust, or a science-fiction adventure?

    Also, Spielberg not taking risks? I think The Color Purple, Empire of the Sun, Schindler's List, A.I., and others were pretty big risks. What risks has Lucas taken since Star Wars?

    I like Star Wars and American Graffiti as much as the next guy, but I really don't see why Lucas is a better filmmaker than Spielberg.
  20. darthtenbiscuits Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Sep 7, 2001
    star 7
    the attack to the Death Star was copied almost shot by shot from previous war movies. The famous "wipe transitions" were taken from movie serials too.

    That's not entirly correct. GL took various shots from those old films and edited them in an entirely different way to use as a reference. So it wasn't as if he just copied another movie shot for shot. Even Spielburg admits that Lucas is the master of the editing process.

    I personaly feel that both are great and their contemporary work is highly underrated. And shame on Esquire magazine for printing such unfounded tripe just to sell magazines.
  21. gbonkers Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 31, 2004
    star 2
    George is the Producer, meaning he is the one with the money!!!!!!

    Money talks!!!
  22. WEEBACCA Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2004
    star 4
    Weebacca:
    Saying that American Graffiti is the first film with multiple storylines is ridiculous. I don't know where you read this. Here's some pre-American Graffiti films with multiple storylines.


    I've read it in my film history book, in George Lucas Interviews plus my teacher said so as well (I've graduated in film history)
    American Grafitti is indeed the first movie ever to have multiple storylines in the fashion I'm talking about. The characters in Grafitti are all main characters with different stories that has nothing to do with each other. Their stories are not centered around the same plot or goal like it is in other films with so called "multiple storylines".

    Take for instance Bridge on the River Kwai;
    Both main characters' (Guiness and Holden) stories are driven around the same plot point; the prison camp (one escapes, one stays to fight) and the bridge (one builds, one destroys)
    So, as you see, both charactes' stories are all about the same thing, only they have different ways to deal with it, that's what the movie is all about!

    In American Grafitti there's no such solid things to "glue" the characters' stories together around one plot point, that's why the angry Universal Studios excutives told Lucas; "You just can't make movies this way!" (but he was proven wrong by 5 Oscar nominations and 1 box office record!)

    Also, Spielberg not taking risks? I think The Color Purple, Empire of the Sun, Schindler's List, A.I., and others were pretty big risks. What risks has Lucas taken since Star Wars?

    What I critisize Spielberg for (A.I. and Minority Report) is his way of including commercial elements with seemingly no other function than "being commercial" in order to make sure his films appeals to as many popcorn-eaters as possible! He looses sight of what elements are most important to the story and gives them lower priority! The truth is that he doesn't dare being "artistic" anymore.
    George Lucas hasn't taken too many risks since Star Wars (apart from investing in Powaqatsi, Tucker, Ran etc.) But it's my impression that this is caused by him taking a break as a director. He starts thinking like a producer ("am I gonna loose or earn money on this project?"). If he had still directed most of his films he most certainly would have done more artistic stuff (he claims so himself)...

    I like Star Wars and American Graffiti as much as the next guy, but I really don't see why Lucas is a better filmmaker than Spielberg.

    Now,that is my personal opinion! I'm a HUGE fan of Spielberg, but Lucas' directing style is in my eyes better than that of Spielberg. I know that we would have seen some great films from Lucas if he hadn't taken such a long break from directing. Coppola said something like "the world has lost one of it's greatest directors" when he heard that Lucas was no longer going to direct...









  23. Atticus Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 31, 2002
    star 4
    I like them both, but I'm going to have to go with Spielberg on this. Good films with good acting and story.
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