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Gallery NEW POSTER! "Imperial Recruitment 2" - continuation of "Imperial Recruitment" by Feng Zhu

Discussion in 'Fan Art' started by FlyffAntilles, Feb 21, 2009.

Moderators: Corellian_Outrider
  1. FlyffAntilles Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Feb 21, 2009
    No, I didn't realize. ;)

    Well, all I can say to them is, I'm just more entitled to cheesecake than beefcake.

    So, go for it and feel free to draw Tarkin in tight leather pants! ;)
  2. FlyffAntilles Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Feb 21, 2009
  3. FlyffAntilles Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Feb 21, 2009
  4. Goodwood Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 11, 2011
    star 4
    Well to be honest mate, comparing this new piece with your previous efforts, it seems like a bit of a step backward in your development.
  5. FlyffAntilles Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Feb 21, 2009
    This is not a regular poster, but just an illustration of the character for the SW Fanon Wiki. So, all the background, slogan and so on is missing.

    Stay tuned for more regular posters coming in this series! :)
  6. TrakNar Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 4, 2011
    star 5
    I've been holding off making serious comments as there is no easy way to do this. But, I'm just going to wing it.

    I think you misunderstood what @Goodwood said in regards to your image. He wasn't talking about how it wasn't a pin-up. He was referring to the overall quality of the image, particularly regarding anatomy, proportion, and shading. This is a common issue with a large number of your works and I will get into more detail with an analysis of your current image.

    As I said, there is no easy way to say this, but you need to work on your anatomy and proportion. Minafe's legs are two different lengths, her balance is off, and her torso is strangely long. I can't quite tell where her shoulders are, or where her legs meet at the torso.

    This is a very common problem that I've noticed with your images. The limbs on some are disproportionate to their bodies. This image is another example of legs being two different lengths. You have the pelvis tilted in an unnatural manner, with the feet on the same plane, yet the hips are clearly at different heights. The legs are also pressed together to form some type of mega leg. Unless you were referencing from multiple images, or a really wonky photo angle, legs do not work this way.

    In this group image, again the same problems, particularly with the woman in the back. Her legs, despite standing on the same plane, are two different lengths, and I'm not even sure where they connect. The other woman in the back has something odd going on with her elbow. Remember, there is muscle, fat, and organs under the skin, and they have to share the space with a skeleton.

    There are a number of others, but I don't have the time to go through every single one. The limbs seem to be your biggest issue, and it strikes me as if you're putting together people as if they were Lego. I think studying anatomy and proportion would help your work immensely, as this latest piece is a definite step backward.

    Also, your shading is what is known as "pillow shading" and I feel you would benefit greatly from studying shading techniques. Pick a light source and shade accordingly. Practice with simple objects and move up to complex shapes. Practice with a single light source and with multiple. I also suggest having a lighting rig and photographing action figures for reference. Also, if you can get them, live models. Have friends model for you, so you can get a feel for how the human body moves.

    I'm sorry if this seems mean, as I'm trying not to be so. I want to help you, and the best way I can at the moment is to alert you to your weaknesses. Once you know what they are, you can work on fixing them. :)
  7. FlyffAntilles Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Well, thanks for you feedback, TrakNar. I appreciate tips by fellow artist and will try to improve. Concerning the limbs: Well, most times I use photos as templates and if these are not fake, it's natural poses. Could be, that it's some details which makes it look weird.

    But: I'm not going to be super realistic with my artwork. Which pinups are really realistic? There's always a bit over-exaggeration in them and that's what I intend as well.

    Here's my newest poster, not showing any limbs. ;) Just portrait. The template for the styling droid was done with a 3D modelling tool called Maya.

    http://flyffantilles.deviantart.com/art/Let-the-EMPIRE-show-Your-GLAMOROUS-side-443681106

    Hope that compensates the last artwork a bit. ;)
  8. Goodwood Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 11, 2011
    star 4
    That's some really high-octane Nightmare Fuel, mate!
  9. TrakNar Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 4, 2011
    star 5
    I have to agree. It's utterly horrifying. :/

    But, I'd like to discuss your response, "not going for realism."

    Even though you are going for a more stylistic approach, studying anatomy and proportion will help immensely. Figure drawing tends to follow a set of rules, and while some notorious artists will have styles that depict women in downright impossible poses or display impossible anatomy, they still have some concept of proportion (it may not be good proportion, but it is consistent proportion). Aside from the Rob Liefelds, Ian Churchills, Mike Deodatos, and Greg Lands of the world, most stylistic depictions of women have a basis in basic figure drawing.

    For example, Betty Page may be depicted in a poster as having a thinner waist, longer legs, larger chest, and broader hips with a rounder butt. Making adjustments like that is fine. This is a stylized depiction, not a photo. However, there is still a grasp of anatomy and proportion. Her legs aren't mismatched, and they are connected to her torso with at least some depiction of a pelvic region. Her shoulders are drawn with at least some concept of a proper skeletal structure underneath the skin.

    It's okay to be stylized, but don't use style as an excuse. You need to learn the rules before you can break them.
    Last edited by TrakNar, Mar 31, 2014
  10. FlyffAntilles Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Umm, now you're again cryptic with your feedback on that last poster... Well, if you don't like it, just say it, and don't post cryptic insider jokes (at least that's what I receive on my side of communication).

    I don't expect everyone to like the art I'm doing. And I'm also not blaming you, if you really don't. But, I've had many positive responses on FB already on it, so I think I can't be TOO wrong with it... (and it's not responses only from horny guys!)

    Again, thanks for your feedback! As I responded, I will try improving on that and appreciate you giving me tips. The comment concerning my style was not meant as an excuse, but I still want to keep some of that freedom - yes, there are rule, but if I'd want to be realistic, I just could do photographs and post them, to exaggerate a bit. Also I'm still a learner and it's just my hobby to draw, so be a bit patient and relaxed with it. I'm relaxed, I just want to share, what I do in my free time. Be it extremely good or sometimes really shitty.

    And don't expect me to hold back my art only because I've not yet improved. It's work in progress and I will keep sharing my art, be it good or bad in your eyes.
  11. Antlers Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2012
    star 1
    "Style" - It's a trap!

    No really, style can be a huge honkin' trap for artists. Trying to develop a style, or trying to draw in a certain style, can hold an artist back for years. If you let it all go and just try to draw exactly what you see (not what you think you see or what you want to see), you'll improve immensely. And then you can go back and create some really amazing illustrations with the flavors that you want.

    Also - the human mind knows when a body isn't right. When parts don't fit correctly, there is a sense of unease in the viewer. However, when the body is fundamentally correct, the viewer is put at ease and can enjoy other elements of the drawing. It's not just about exaggeration. Jessica Rabbit is a prime example - she literally defies gravity with an impossible exaggeration (her breasts bounce up when naturally they would bounce down), but she is universally loved and idolized despite defying physics and extreme proportions because she is fundamentally correct. Holly Wood from "Cool World" is another good example - she is very real, very flesh-and-blood, despite a tiny waist and a full chest. It's not really about the boobs or the butt - it's the whole body working together correctly.
    Goodwood and TrakNar like this.
Moderators: Corellian_Outrider