Nordic Recipes

Discussion in 'Nordic Countries Discussion' started by Joey7F, Mar 3, 2003.

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  1. Joey7F Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 18, 2000
    star 4
    Hearty greetings to my Scandinavian tf.ners,

    The other day I was craving some Open Face sandwiches with egg and salmon (brilliant combination that sounds nasty but tastes great).

    When I visited Norway, I had some of the best seafood ever and from what I understand, Sweden, Denmark and Finland cook their grub equally well.

    All that culinary ass-kissing aside :p, what secret family recipes are you willing to share with myself and everyone else here?

    From Lefse to Lingonberry Cream, let it rip!

    --Joey
  2. Tod Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 29, 1999
    star 4
    Now that Easter is coming soon I decided to post a recipe for the (in)famous Finnish Easter dessert, Mämmi. It may look a bit suspicious but it's delicious.

    [image=http://www.itampere.info/1080/mammi.jpg]

    6 quarts water
    1 lb. malt
    3 lbs. rye flour
    molasses to taste
    1-2 tsp. salt
    4 Tbsp. chopped orange rind

    Mix the malt and flour. In a large cooking pan (with a heavy bottom if available), heat about 2 quarts of the water and add enough of the flour/malt mix to form a thin mixture (like velli). Sprinkle with a layer of malt and flour. Cover the pan and place in a warm place to sweeten, about one hour. Now mix the sprinkled flour and malt into the mixture. Add more hot water and again a layer of flour and malt. Leave to sweeten. Repeat as often as needed to include all remaining water, flour and malt. With the last addition, season the mämmi to taste with molasses and orange rind. Cook for about 10 mins., stirring constantly. Whip till cooled. Place in low pans (ah, to have those birch bark mämmituokkoset available). Do not fill too full, because mämmi will rise in the oven. Bake in moderate oven for about 1-2 hours. Temperatures that are too low during cooking and baking tend to make the mämmi bitter. Baked mämmi will be cooled quickly and served with cold cream and sugar.



    I'll post more Finnish recipes later but now you can all try making mämmi. You will love it.
  3. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Nov 4, 1998
    star 7
    But before Easter you have to eat a semla.

    [image=http://www.jms.se/roger/kfrecept/bilder/lo_3085_3141_kf_semla.jpg]

    75 g butter
    250 ml milk
    25 g yeast
    0,25 tsp salt
    50 g sugar
    1 egg
    700-800 ml flour

    filling
    200g marzipan
    100 ml milk
    200-300 ml whipped cream

    melt the butter and mix it with the milk to a temperature of 37 C, add the rest of the ingredients, but not all flour to a nice dough. Let it rest for 30 minutes.

    knead the dough and roll it to buns. let it rest for 20 minutes.

    Put the buns in the lower part of the oven ( 200 c) for about 25 minutes. Let it cool under a cloth.

    Cut off the top of the buns and make a hole in them. Mix the marzipan with the bread you took out of the hole and milk and fill the hole with it. Put the whipped cream over it and put the top back.

    Sprinkle powdersugar and cinnamon on top.

    You can serve it like that, or if you want it even better, heat some milk, put the semla in a bowl and pour the milk so the semla floats. (yummie)


    I hope you understand my translation of the recipe. :)
  4. Tod Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 29, 1999
    star 4
    Here's more Finnish recipes:



    [image=http://virtual.finland.fi/finfo/images/food/recip17.jpg]

    Karelian pasties
    "Karjalanpiirakat"
    Ingredients:
    1 decilitre
    ½ - 1 tsp
    2½ decilitre water
    salt
    rye flour
    Rice filling:
    2,5 decilitre
    1 litre
    2,5 decilitre
    1 tsp water
    milk
    rice
    salt

    1. Rinse the rice and place it in boiling water. Simmer until most of the water is absorbed.Add the milk, lower the heat to a minimum, and partially cover the pot. Simmer until the milk has been absorbed and the rice has turned into a thick porridge. Season with salt and leave to cool.
    2. Add the flour and salt to the water and mix into a solid, compact dough.
    3. Form the dough into a strip and divide into 12 pieces.
    4. Roll the pieces into flat thin ovals.
    5. Spread some filling on each oval. Then fold the sides towards the center, pinching and making neat pleats along the edge.
    6. Bake at 300 ºC for about 10 minutes.
    7. Brush them well with melted butter or a butter and water mixture.
    8. Place the pasties, separated with baking paper, in a bowl and cover with a towel to soften the crusts.
    9. Serve warm with butter or egg butter which is made by mixing equal parts of butter, (cottage cheese) and chopped hard-boiled egg.




    [image=http://virtual.finland.fi/finfo/images/food/recip5.jpg]

    Karelian Hot Pot
    Karjalanpaisti
    (for four - five persons)

    - 300 g chuck steak
    - 300 g pork shoulder
    - 300 g stewing lamb or mutton
    - 2-3 onions
    - 1 1/2 tsp salt
    - 8 allspice
    - water

    Cut the meat into cubes (4x4 cm). There is no need to remove small bones. Put the meat and coarsely chopped onion in layers in a casserole, seasoning each layer with salt and allspice. Add enough water to almost cover the meat.
    Bake without a cover at a moderate temperature, c. 175 °C, for 2 1/2-3 hours. Cover the casserole towards the end of the cooking time.

    Serve with mashed potato, boiled swedes (boiled Swedes will do nicely too ;)) and lingonberry purée.

  5. Joey7F Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 18, 2000
    star 4
    Anne: That sounds good, but what is Marzipan?

    That Finnish casserole looks pretty good too!

    --Joey
  6. Enji Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 14, 2002
    star 6
    OA: Cinnamon on a semla??? [face_shocked]
    Strange, I've never heard of that. Must be some weird OA custom... ;)

    Joey: marzipan is a sort of almond paste. Yummy! :)

    Secret family recipes for swedish food? Well, I think every mother in Sweden has their of recipe for how to make swedish meatballs... I can't remember my mum's right now, but I can ask her for it and post it later... :)
  7. Joey7F Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 18, 2000
    star 4
    So Swedish Meatballs are really Swedish?

    I thought that was like "French Fries" or "Dutch Apple Pie".

    I am not sure if Sweden is like this, but in America we append every nation possible to our food to make it seem more exotic.

    Except now some restaurants are serving "Freedom Fries" to protest the French.

    Crazy Mixed up world we got :p

    --Joey





    --Joey
  8. Enji Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 14, 2002
    star 6
    "Freedom Fries", LOL! [face_laugh]

    French fries is actually a misunderstanding. They come from Belgium originally... and Belgium still serves the best French Fries in the world! [face_love]
    In Sweden we call them pommes frites, which is french for "fried apples". Stupid swedes didn't understand that the french word for "potato" is "pomme du terre", "apple from earth". ;)

    My, now I'm rambling again... :p
  9. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Nov 4, 1998
    star 7
    Ok, here's one version of Swedish meatballs.

    Swedish meatballs
    400-500g mince meat
    5 tbsp dried breadcrums
    100-150 ml milk
    1,5 tsp salt
    1 egg
    white pepper
    allspice
    ginger

    mix the dried breadcrums and milk and let it swell for at least 10 minutes.

    add the mince and the salt and mix well.

    add the egg and the spices.

    form small round balls and fry them in a pan, not too many at the time.


    [image=http://www.jms.se/roger/kfrecept/bilder/lo_4968_5260_kf_ekopasta.jpg]
  10. Tod Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 29, 1999
    star 4
    And here you have a recipe for finnish meatballs:


    [image=http://virtual.finland.fi/finfo/images/food/recip4.jpg]

    Meatballs
    "Lihapullat"
    (for four - five persons)

    - 500 g minced beef
    - 1 dl fine dry breadcrumbs or two slices of white bread
    - 1 dl cream
    - 1 onion
    - 1 tblsp oil
    - 1 egg
    - 1 tsp salt
    - 1/4 tsp allspice or white pepper
    Gravy:
    - 2 tblsp fat
    - 2 tblsp flour
    - 4 dl pan juices

    Mix breadcrumbs with water and cream in a bowl. Let stand for a while. Finely chop the onion and sauté in oil in a frying pan or microwave oven. Add the onion, egg, seasonings and meat. Mix until smooth. Wet your hands and shape the mixture into balls. Fry meatballs in hot fat on all sides. Small balls will be done in 3-5 minutes, larger ones 5-8 minutes.

    To make gravy, brown the flour lightly in fat. Add the liquid stirring all the time. Add the cream and check seasonings. The gravy can be served separately or poured over the meatballs. Serve with potatoes and grated carrots. Lingonberry jam and gherkins also go well with the dish.


  11. MaxPayne Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 15, 2002
    star 2
    [image=http://www.home.no/torfinn/grandiosa_std.gif]

    The Grandiosa
    You take the pizza out of it's package. Then you put it in the oven for about 12 minutes.

    voila!

    Yum yum, eller hva norrbaggar?! ;) [face_laugh] :D
  12. Joey7F Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 18, 2000
    star 4
    In Sweden we call them pommes frites, which is french for "fried apples". Stupid swedes didn't understand that the french word for "potato" is "pomme du terre", "apple from earth".

    My, now I'm rambling again...


    Funny that you mention that :p. My dad was asking me what they called French Fries in France (I walked around more than he did because he was there on business). I said, I can't remember but I would guess "Pommes Frites" because some Norwegian restaurants called them that.

    His French Canadian colleagues told him that meant fried apples but they thought they were mistranslating...all more reason why we should all use English :p

    Max, that sounds like that would stretch my cooking abilities ;)

    --Joey
  13. Swedish_Jedi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 15, 2002
    star 4
    i'm more fo a Kroppkakor(boildes potatoes stuffed with "fläsk"??) and Palt (the same as kroppkakor but it is pigblood in this).. then i also love the bread thatu only can buy in the nothern parts of Sweden...f.ex. Kågekaka and Ljusugnbröd
  14. Karoline Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 18, 2001
    star 4
    LOL [face_laugh] @ MaxPayne


    Risgroet is my favourite!

    [image=http//www.meadjohnson-scand/finland/bilder/groet./image.jpg]


    1 pack of special rice porrige- rice
    1 litre of milk
    3 dl of water (I think)
    1 teaspoon of salt

    Cook for an hour, the porridge should be boiling gently. Stir all the time, or the milk wil make it boil all over your kitchen stove :)
  15. Swedish_Sith Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 29, 2002
    star 2
    Hey Joey! Ever tried some swedish "surströmming"? :D

    You can either buy it in a can, or make your own. Just buy some fish, put it in water, add some salt and herbs. And then, just wait til it´s rotten. Then you can eat it with some hot potatoes, drink "snaps" and beer and sing silly songs.

    That´s a swedish tradition, a perfect excuse to eat rotten food and get wasted. :D
  16. Enji Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 14, 2002
    star 6
    It's also the perfect way of making me run as fast as I can in the opposite direction... I do not like surströmming.

    I prefer the crayfish parties. There you also have the silly songs, the schnaps, and you get to wear silly hats! :D
  17. Swedish_Sith Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 29, 2002
    star 2
    Well Enji, I think we should prepare for a "FFS Crayfish-party" this fall. I HATE "surströmmingsskivor" too, it smelles like crap, and the taste is even worse :D
  18. Joey7F Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 18, 2000
    star 4
    I think I will respectfully decline recipes involving decomposing fish :p

    Risgrøt sounds easy to make. Is this the food, that you put an almond in?

    And the almond either brings you a mate or a pig depending on the country?

    Is this the same as Riskrem or is this very different? (Riskrem, I think, was topped with Rasberry?)

    --Joey
  19. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Nov 4, 1998
    star 7
    Yes you put the almond in the risgröt, and in Sweden you get married if you get it.

    Riskrem sounds more like what we in Sweden call Ris a lá Malta, and is basically the leftover of the risgröt that you mix with some vanilla and a whipped cream. At least that's good to have with raspberries.


    Oh, and yes I want cinnamon on my risgröt. (I seem to want to have cinnamon on everything)
  20. Enji Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 14, 2002
    star 6
    Yeah, OA, but at least it's normal to put cinnamon on the risgröt. At least, everyone I know do it...

    Ris à la Malta is delicious, highly recommended! Although I want it with strawberry jam... [face_love]
  21. Vargman77 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 18, 2002
    star 4
    Risgrynsgröt is not my favourite.. I prefer mannagrynsgröt... But I dont have the recipe here... Maybe OA or Enji has it?
  22. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Nov 4, 1998
    star 7
    I don't have a recipe for mannagrynsgröt, but here comes another.

    KÃ¥lbotten
    1,5 cup of water
    1,5 cup of flour
    1 tsp of salt
    bacon

    Mix the water, flour and salt. Fry the bacon in a pan and put it on a plate. Pour the batter in the pan and fry just like a pancake. Eat with the bacon.


    That's my rescue when I'm out of money and it's fast and actually quite good. If you want it to be healthier, add some veggies.
  23. Darth_Haggis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 21, 2002
    star 4
    No! :_| I'm getting hungry just reading through this thread!

    [Homer_Simpson]Mmmmmm.....Unprocessed fish sticks.....[/Homer_Simpson]
  24. DARTHLARS Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 12, 2002
    star 4
    I like cinnamon with my semla and risgröt. :p

    Next Tuesday, we celebrate Waffle Day here in Sweden! On this day, we eat lots of waffles. (well... I do :D )

    Many people buy waffle mix, but I think it is a waste of money. Waffle mix contains only flour, (powder) milk and baking soda - things I always have at home! I have memorized a very simple recipe, that is just as good.
    2.5 dl ice-cold water
    2.5 dl ice-cold milk
    3.5 dl wheat flour
    2 tsp baking soda
    1 dl cold, melted butter (you can use less)
    a pinch of salt and sugar
    (2.5 dl ~= 1 cup)

    Mix it all up. Bake each waffle in turn, in a waffle iron. I have noticed that baking a waffle takes just as much time as eating one. :p Serve with strawberry jam and whipped cream.
  25. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Nov 4, 1998
    star 7
    If you have access to it a good idea is to change some of the ice-cold water to clean and pure snow. They get even better that way.
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