FF:NZ NZ SW fan's musical taste ...

Discussion in 'Oceania Discussion Boards' started by SimplyThrilledHoney, Oct 8, 2002.

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  1. SithForceLord Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 2, 2001
    star 6
    THANK. YOU.

    My music background started at a young age. Being taken to the Dire Straights concert in Auckland, by my parents, at the tender age of 5 was fantastic. I still remember the loudness.

    JP also moulded my musical appreciation with his Dave Dobbyn, Split Enz, Exponents etc. When I was 11/12 I was mocked heavily for listening to the Exponents, now at parties it's what everyone sings to! Go Figure.

    But the White Stripes, Deceptikonz, and Goldenhorse are a couple of new artists that I find great to listen to on the radio.

    Stop, Drop and Roll is a crack up song that will be huge in NZ soon from the DECEPTIKONZ. 7 Nation Army is a great track and I'm seriously thinking of getting their album soon.

    anyhoo...
  2. Kitt327 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 23, 2000
    star 4
    But what I've been trying to get across is that the music someone listens to DOES NOT mean they are something or anotherthing!

    Of course not; no one said that. I do think it's fair to conclude that a guy acting in a creepy way towards a girl while claiming to like "sensitive" music ...well, it's a good bet that they don't really like said music. And vice versa, of course ... I'm sure there's a female equivalent. Claiming that liking said music makes you creepy is another line of thought entirely ...

    But, you know, I'd have never picked Ben Harper, for example, as "sensitive music". When I think sensitive, I think Beethoven's moonlight sonata, or fur elise. //goes to put on piano by candlelight cd ;)

    I do think that 'sub-culture' stuff is a load of trash. I remember they once published 'the seven teenage sub-cultures' in the newspaper once, complete with the clothes they wear and the music they like. Pretty depressing, to think that people think they are so cut and dried they can be placed in only seven different categories. Worse that those stupid personality tests ...
  3. SimplyThrilledHoney Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 19, 2002
    star 3
    > I do think that 'sub-culture' stuff is a load of trash. I remember they once published 'the seven teenage sub-cultures' in the newspaper once, complete with the clothes they wear and the music they like. Pretty depressing, to think that people think they are so cut and dried they can be placed in only seven different categories.

    I remember when I started going to University, and started going to concerts. Grunge was big at the time, and everyone at said gigs was either a goth, or had a flannel shirt and goatee. I'd just turn up in jeans and t-shirt. I remember people talking about how "individual" and "alternative" they were, and i was just thinking YOU ALL LOOK EXACTLY THE SAME!

    Kinda like that scene in "Life Of Brian"
    Brian: You are all individuals!
    Crowd (in unison): We are all individuals!
  4. Kai_Halicon Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2002
    star 4
    I remember when I started going to University, and started going to concerts. Grunge was big at the time, and everyone at said gigs was either a goth, or had a flannel shirt and goatee. I'd just turn up in jeans and t-shirt. I remember people talking about how "individual" and "alternative" they were, and i was just thinking YOU ALL LOOK EXACTLY THE SAME!

    I know the feeling. When Korn allowed 'nu-metal' to rear its ugly head, my sixth-form class was suddenly full of dreadlocked, Adidas garb-wearing types. I should know, I was one.

    Looking back, I could kick myself, but I figure it was an important part of finding who I was at the time. I guess it's all relative to age. You're more likely to see some kid with dreads, a Linkin Park t-shirt and jeans that could fit two other people in them as opposed to someone in their mid-late twenties.

    Notice how certain music types tend to catch certain ages, though I'm sure that's the intention.
  5. SimplyThrilledHoney Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 19, 2002
    star 3
    > Notice how certain music types tend to catch certain ages, though I'm sure that's the intention.

    This is my main reason for hating Limp Bizkit with a burning passion. I'm not sure exactly how old Fred Durst is, but I'm pretty sure he would be in his early to mid 30s. And yet that band's music is targeted entirely at 16 year old boys. I read someone describe it as "I don't want to tidy my bedroom music" ... it may be filled with rage, but it's not rage against opression, or racism, or politics or anything of any worth. It's a rich thirty-something singing about how girls don't understand him, and how hard his life is, being so famous. I can't believe kids actually buy into the hype. I really think that the major labels and the nu-metal bands they've signed (and there probably are some out there that aren't morally bankrupt) are exploiting their fans and misrepresenting themselves. Unfortunately the music industry is getting less and less about the actual music, and more and more about the "market".
  6. Kai_Halicon Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2002
    star 4
    This is my main reason for hating Limp Bizkit with a burning passion. I'm not sure exactly how old Fred Durst is, but I'm pretty sure he would be in his early to mid 30s.

    I think he's in his mid-thirties, though I recently discovered that he always wears a cap to disguise his extremely bad bald spot.

    :D

    And yet that band's music is targeted entirely at 16 year old boys. I read someone describe it as "I don't want to tidy my bedroom music" ... it may be filled with rage, but it's not rage against opression, or racism, or politics or anything of any worth.

    I believe that form of rage is supposedly called 'teenage angst'.

    It's a rich thirty-something singing about how girls don't understand him, and how hard his life is, being so famous.

    The world, particularly the music world, is wrought with hypocrisy.

    I can't believe kids actually buy into the hype. I really think that the major labels and the nu-metal bands they've signed (and there probably are some out there that aren't morally bankrupt) are exploiting their fans and misrepresenting themselves.

    Unfortunately, it's all part of this ever changing world and to remain objective, a similar thing was said about both grunge and goth music in the past, albeit it possibly worded differently.

    Unfortunately the music industry is getting less and less about the actual music, and more and more about the "market".

    Case in point I just noticed when I visited my friend manages a Sounds store. He was putting up new posters for the new Jewel album and I was pretty horrified to find she's sold out from the honest, folky-ballad style she had that made her famous and has undergone the transformation to generic pop-vixen.

    Whilst I'm not a huge fan, I admired her because of her struggle from the bottom up (she used to live in her car at one point before fame and worked in coffee houses for less than the price of a new release CD for a whole days work) to where she achieved fame and managed the rare task of continuing to play songs she wrote.

    It's kind of disillusioning to see her give into to public demand and change her image and sound to appeal a musical audience that tends to be so one dimensional. Having said that, she's still looking as fine and hot as ever, albeit in a diffent style. (what can I say, I occassionally swim the shallow end of the moral pool.....)

    As a musician in a band myself, I've really noticed a lot of changes like that in the musical world where perfomers have remade themselves to gain a larger market share in the target demogrpahic. Metallica springs to mind as a well-known choice - they made the transformation from metal band to 'hard-rock' band and it never quite gelled together. Their latest work, St Anger is a return to their roots, but I couldn't help think it sounded a little too 'nu-metal' ala Slipknot and Godsmack.

    Still, I guess both Metallica and Jewel (how's that for opposite ends of the spectrum?) will continue to sell albums, but I wager both their core fans will be somewhat jaded in regards to future patriotism to their favourite bands.

    Speaking for myself and my own bandmates, it's never been about making money (though that is nice), it's always been about making the kind of music we like. For us, that's a rock/alternative/kitsch sound. A friend of the band's said we'd never make any money on the type of music we play, but it doesn't faze us. At the end of the day, it's more important that we do what we know and like, not what others expect of us.

    ::Hmmm...another rant::
  7. -Winter- Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Mar 12, 2002
    star 2
    I thought Jewel's new music video's pretty shocking. What the heck was she wearing!?

    At the end of the day, it's more important that we do what we know and like, not what others expect of us.

    Yeah, but there are some people out there who earn their living playing music. A struggling singer or banf might change their style so they can feed themselves. The public decides what sells and what doesn't; it's a sad truth really.
  8. jp-30 Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Dec 14, 2000
    star 9
    > I'm not sure exactly how old Fred Durst is, but I'm pretty sure he would be in his early to mid 30s. And yet that band's music is targeted entirely at 16 year old boys.

    Let's not forget that when the Beatles, the Stones and Elvis were in their formative recording years, they too appealed to the 'kids' while being a decade older than that audience.

    It's not a new phenominon in pop music.

  9. SimplyThrilledHoney Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 19, 2002
    star 3
    > Let's not forget that when the Beatles, the Stones and Elvis were in their formative recording years, they too appealed to the 'kids' while being a decade older than that audience.

    Yeah, sure ... but I think making music which happens to appeal to "the kids" is quite a different think to cynically marketing yourself at a demographic. The Beatles were adored by the screaming hordes, but were also beloved of beatniks and hipsters, as well as older rock'n'rollers and Mods. They weren't targeting their music at a demographic, they were just making music with a wide appeal. My suspician with a lot of the current chart bands is that they're just about making money.

    Kai, I'm reading an excellent book you might be interested in. It's called "The Last Party: Britpop, Blair and The Decline Of British Rock". It's really interesting ... it puts the Britpop/"Cool Britannia" movement in the context of Labour's win over the Conservatives in the UK. The authors' main thrust is about Oasis and Blur cosying up to Blair to help secure a Labour victory, and how this had negative effects on British music for years afterwards. It's pretty intersting, and uses the Justine (Elastica)/Damon (Blur)/Brett (Suede) love triangle as the central narrative axis. It's an excellent bio of those bands, as well as a pretty cutting attack on the mixing of art and politics. You're welcome to borrow it when I've finished.

    (Oh, and sorry to anyone who has no idea what I'm talking about.)
  10. Kai_Halicon Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2002
    star 4
    Yes, I've think I've heard of it - a friend from my shcolar days mentioned something about reading it a couple of weeks ago. I'll trust the both of you on this seeing as your musical taste mirrors my own and my friend was the one who introduced me to Irvine Welsh and Nick Hornby.

    I'm starting to contemplate visiting Wellington again (spend four months there back in 2001, loved it) as the other guitarist in my band is there at the moment and continually sends me text messages citing how much more liberated and focused the city is on local music and freedom of expression.

    Wellington's always been more focused on art, culutre and music than Auckland has and this was comfirmed by my bandmate, who was able to see five local acts for less than the price of McDonalds combo both nights of the weekend. He's there for a week more and is seriously able to find a new gig for each night. As someone who used to adore The Temple on Queen Street, I'd really like to check it out. I forsee the band heading down there for the next long weekend.

    Lawrence - did you know Interpol's playing in Melbourne in a couple of weeks? My bassist and other guitarist are considering selling body organs to fund their trip.

    :D
  11. SimplyThrilledHoney Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 19, 2002
    star 3
    (sigh) Interpol in Melbourne ... I was seriously thinking of going. Yo La Tengo are playing a few days either earlier or later, and I thought about making it for a double-header. However, I've already had one trip to Melbourne this year, and need to save some money.

    I'm amazed at the number of bands who come to Australia and not to New Zealand. A lot of te bands actually play Perth, which is much further from either Sydney or Melbourne than Auckland. We really miss out here, although internationally we're known as very bad ticket buyers. Apparently New Zealanders always buy their tickets at the last moment, which makes bringing anyone out here a real risk unless they're a sure sell-out.

    I really like Wellington. It's a small enough city that there's a real "scene" in the CBD. I'm thinking of heading down there for a weekend later in the year. There seemed to be a lot of bands playing when i was down there in January ... definately more supportive of local music anyhow. Auckland's just a big soulless hole unless you like dance music, in which case you're fairly well catered for.
  12. SimplyThrilledHoney Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 19, 2002
    star 3
    (sigh) Interpol in Melbourne ... I was seriously thinking of going. Yo La Tengo are playing a few days either earlier or later, and I thought about making it for a double-header. However, I've already had one trip to Melbourne this year, and need to save some money.

    I'm amazed at the number of bands who come to Australia and not to New Zealand. A lot of te bands actually play Perth, which is much further from either Sydney or Melbourne than Auckland. We really miss out here, although internationally we're known as very bad ticket buyers. Apparently New Zealanders always buy their tickets at the last moment, which makes bringing anyone out here a real risk unless they're a sure sell-out.

    I really like Wellington. It's a small enough city that there's a real "scene" in the CBD. I'm thinking of heading down there for a weekend later in the year. There seemed to be a lot of bands playing when i was down there in January ... definately more supportive of local music anyhow. Auckland's just a big soulless hole unless you like dance music, in which case you're fairly well catered for.
  13. Humble extra Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 1999
    star 5
    yo la tengo has come to nz before, they played at orientation in otago a couple of years back, but i was too drunk to remember much of what happened that night
  14. Kai_Halicon Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2002
    star 4
    Damn, I'm jealous of you, Humble. Yo la tengo would of been awesome live.

    Auckland's just a big soulless hole unless you like dance music, in which case you're fairly well catered for.

    I disagree in part - it's not that bad - The Temple on Queen St and Grand Central in Ponsonby always have great open mic nites though I think the Grand does that less now.

    As for the dance music - I don't mind house music in small does - George FM is one the stations I play most in my car after BFM, Channel Z (though less than before) and The Rock. I used to be really into the loungebar scene but it's full of druggies and people looking to score now.

    Does anybody remember 96.1fm that played in 1997/98 - they used to play some of the best alternative music in the world, kind of like a more liberated Channel Z. Sneaker Pimps, Portishead, Hooverphonic, all the funky stuff we don't get anymore......

  15. Kitt327 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 23, 2000
    star 4
    We have a huge music culture down here in south Auckland. Lots of soul, in every sense.
  16. SithForceLord Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 2, 2001
    star 6
    Yea Ninty Six dot One was great Kai! I remember when it first came out it was like 10,000 songs ad free. Now it's a classical or jazz frequency :p

    I remember in 3rd form Art sitting in class listening to 96.1 (1997) :D
  17. SimplyThrilledHoney Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 19, 2002
    star 3
    > I remember in 3rd form Art sitting in class listening to 96.1 (1997)

    And the generation gap rears it's ugly head ... I was in my 5th year of University in 1997! (sigh)

    I don't think I've listened to the radio in probably ten years now. I used to listen to bfm a bit in my first year ('93) when it was still very studently and umprofessional, and when they still played a lot of indie guitar pop.

    Since then I've gotten into most bands just by reading about them either in magazines or on the net ... it's one of those self-perpetuating things where once you get into music, you just find more and more. I think I have about 1200 CDs now, so "radio lawrence" is the best place for music at my house/my work.
  18. SithForceLord Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 2, 2001
    star 6
    This generation gap thing is kinda crap. Most of my good friends these days are from 22 to 28. This is not because I can't find any friends :p lol

    Not really sure why, but having a brother 12 years older may have something to do with it. I got on with JP a lot better than with my other brother when I was younger. I have heaps of friends that are my age from uni and from home - but I spend most of my free time with Centuri and Paul and their partners of course.

    mmmmm anyhoo back to music :p I find myself, these days, listening to music at any chance I get. Channel Z mostly for radio - or classic hits / solid gold. And I have put also every single CD of mine onto mty computer and that plays most of the time (unless I'm gaming heheh).
  19. Kai_Halicon Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2002
    star 4
    Just as note to any interested Aucklander.....

    I may be performing at an open-mic night at The Temple on Queen St sometime in the next three or so weeks with one of the other guitarists (we have three) from my band under the alias "Tracer" (if you've seen any Kevin Smith films, you'll understand it's an insult his world...)doing a couple of accoustic versions of some of our tracks.

    It was an idea we had a while ago but because we're not quite confident enough to go fully live, myself and bandmate Paul and playing guinea pig for the other three band members to see how we are recieved on stage. Because I'm the only one who knows all the lyrics to our tracks (even the other vocalist doesn't know them and he's supposed to be lead vox!) I was kinda a foregone choice.

    So, I will post a date if it's going to happen but it's still up in the air. However, my afformentioned guitarist colleague Paul's other band, in which he plays bass will be playing during the Masonic Tavern in a couple of weeks so the two may clash.

    Anyone keen to watch me make a monkey of myslef, raise your hands now...



  20. SithForceLord Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 2, 2001
    star 6
    [image=http://www.ninjamanmovie.co.uk/pictures/big/gordon-hand-up.jpg]

    But alas, for I am many miles away. :(

    Break a leg.
  21. Kai_Halicon Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2002
    star 4
    Ha-bloody-ha. :D

    Just for that, I'll be making a mockery of ye with The Ballad of SithForceLord, a tale of young student who's love of SW, LOTOR and hunting get conglomerated when all of his collectable figures hunt him down as the ultimate prey.....

    [evil_dictator_laugh]mwahahahahhahhahaha![/evil_dictator_laugh]

    8-}
  22. FORCECOMMANDER Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jun 30, 2001
    LOTOR

    My love for Little Orange Things Of Rubber are not to be mocked with Kai.

    My extensive collection will be worth millions one day. You'll see. You ALL will see!


    //leaves in a sulk//
  23. SithForceLord Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 2, 2001
    star 6
    /\ oops. Silly sock.

    Weird that it's older than me eh? lol
  24. Kai_Halicon Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2002
    star 4
    Ironically, my sock was registered over a year before this user ID. I just never used it because I didn't like the name in retrospect. However, it's good for getting some respect from n00bs though.

    Anywho, back to music.

    Lawrence - ever heard of the Yeah Yeah Yeah's? Apparently they are pretty catchy and have a yo la tengo sound.....
  25. SimplyThrilledHoney Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 19, 2002
    star 3
    I have heard the Yeah Yeah Yeahs ... although the YLT comparison is completely unfounded. Yeah Yeah Yeahs (hereafter YYYs) are sort of New York art punk ... they're a 3 peice with a female singer, a guitarist and drummer. (What is it with bands not having bass players any more?) They play short, shouty but melodic songs ... they remind me of early Elastica if anything. (And I say this as a huge fan of Elastica.)

    I've seen Yo La Tengo play twice, once at Orientation in '98 (free) and then again in 2000 at The Powerstation. Both fantastic gigs ... they're excellent musicians and can go into this almost free-jazz like improvisation at the drop of a hat. They're also really funny ... for "You Can Have It All" (off "And Nothing Turned Itself Inside Out") they used a drum machine and keyboard sample, and all stood out the front of their instruments and did a boy-band dance routine.

    The Brunettes got mentioned in this week's NME ... a very favourable live review for one of their London gigs.
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