Of Vader and Heathcliff

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by Dean1138, Jul 21, 2005.

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  1. Dean1138 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 3, 2005
    star 1
    I don't know if any of you have made this connection - I myself only realised this recently, but do any of you think Anakin's character could be closley associated with Heathcliff's (the dark protaganist from Wuthering Heights). Now hear me out here. I know many of you would think that theis classic novel is nothing more than a romantic period piece but in it's day it was considered a brutal, demonic tale.

    I list these as some points to get the comparison started:

    a) Both characters are introduced initially as cherub faced boys, fun loving, full of life and innocence. - and started out as slaves

    c) Both were well attuned to their physical surroundings and also had a connection to nature and the force.

    d) Both become dark overlords (landlords) and are ruthless in their dealings with people

    e) Both are tormented by their lost love and are consumed by hatred toward those who have stood in their way

    f) Neither of them is able to let go of their past or their relationships, they both refuse to move on.

    g) In the end you get the sense that both of them have become part of nature or the force

    h) And they are both mad keen on playing golf on Sundays

    . . . Well yeah I threw in that last one

    What do you guys think, or am I just rabbiting on for the sake of it?
  2. Queengodess Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 18, 2000
    star 4
    Nope, I think you make perfect sense. I, too, have made the connection, and I love both Heathcliff and Vader. But you forget one very important point: both are really, really goodlooking (well, not Vader so much after Mustafar, but up until that point...)
  3. Darth-Seldon Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 17, 2003
    star 6
    Very interesting thoughts. Especially the slave (so important for Anakin) and the landlord (opposite of slave--though Anakin always remained as a slave.) It is funny, I almost bought Wuthering Heights at the store today. I've been meaning to read it for months. I'll probably get to it later in the summer (after Twain, and several others.)

    After reading it, I'll try and find this again to contribute a bit more.



    -Seldon
  4. Dean1138 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 3, 2005
    star 1
    Ah and so are their significant others (Padme and Catherine) though their sons differ somewhat (Luke - super force sensitive, restless youth seeking fun and adventure, Linton - super annoyingly boring, seeking a good lie down by a fire place)

    . . . that's another thing, Both Anakin and Heathcliff had their children hidden from them when they were born, though it is the love of his children that eventually sets Anakin straight, whereas Linton is treated ruthlessly and disdainfully by Heathcliff all for the sake of revenge.
  5. Dean1138 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 3, 2005
    star 1
    BTW, Darth make sure you read it. I know it has the reputation of a soppy period drama, and when I was forced to read it by my wife (She had to watch Star Wars) I was reluctant but I became absorbed in it. It's one of those stories that is so masterfully written that you actually hate to finish it (like Star Wars) as the characters become like friends.
  6. Darth-Seldon Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 17, 2003
    star 6
    I've heard great things about the characters. A drama motivated by the beloved and hated characters which inhabit the pages.

    This reminds me of a thread I made on the connections between Star Wars and Arthur Miller. The truth is that Lucas didn't intend for these connections. These works of Literature didn't influence him. It is that Star Wars fans are seeing connections with other works.

    -Seldon
  7. Dean1138 Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 3, 2005
    star 1
    And I think that is what is so fascinating about Star Wars - I don't know whether GL has ever read Wuthering Heights, probably, and I'm sure the connection wasn't in his mind when he created Vader, but to me it's part of what makes Star Wars rise above the other general blockbusters and run-of-the-mill adventure yarns. The stories are intentionally created to gain a response of familiarity, therefore we are able to associate and feel for and with these characters because of a deep resonance within our collective psyche. That to me is the brilliance and genius of Star Wars.

    Sorry to get all deep and meaningful on y'all but I just love the way Star Wars films are able to do this in such a seemingly simple way!
  8. Darth-Seldon Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 17, 2003
    star 6
    Well being deep and meaningful is the intention of this forum and its original objectives, so don't worry.

    Lucas researched Campbell's works on mythology (mostly Hero with a Thousand Faces.) Campbell argues that all myths from the various diverse cultures around the world have common threads. The characters and stories are often repeated. There are certain archtypes. It is possible that Bronte wove classical mythological themes into her novel, just as Lucas did into his films.

    -Seldon
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