Oscar Score Nominations and Winners: Now Discussing the Year 1967

Discussion in 'Star Wars And Film Music' started by HL&S, Feb 8, 2006.

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  1. sidious618 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 20, 2003
    star 6
    There were quite a few good themes that year- more that I knew about than usual. [face_blush]

    I thought the Spiderman score was good even if I didn't like the film. The score for TTT was magnificent, epic when it needed to be and subtle when it should be. AotC had the beautiful Across the Stars theme but the axing of the last acts's music hurts it a bit. My pick is TTT.
  2. Strilo Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Aug 6, 2001
    star 8
    Gondor's theme was in FOTR yes.
  3. HL&S Magistrate Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2001
    star 6
  4. Strilo Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Aug 6, 2001
    star 8
    Yes but that part of Boromir's speech was IN the Theatrical Edition. Can someone go look at their TE DVD and see if the Gondor theme is present during the Council scene where Boromir speaks about the realm of Gondor keeping the forces of Mordor at bay?
  5. The-Tennis-Ball-Kid Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2004
    star 3
    The Gondor theme is in the TE, as is the Silver Trumpet theme.


    I'd have taken TTT out of that bunch.


    ttbk, Revenge of the Sith
  6. HL&S Magistrate Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2001
    star 6
    Aaah. I thought it was created for the scene in the TTT that was cut from the theatrical edition but was really meant for ROTK. I didn't notice the theme in the TE of TFOTR, only in the EE.
  7. Strilo Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Aug 6, 2001
    star 8
  8. Indiana_Fett Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 12, 2004
    star 4
  9. HL&S Magistrate Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2001
    star 6
    Get out of my thread! [face_not_talking]



















    [face_mischief]
  10. HL&S Magistrate Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2001
    star 6
    Five days have past and we're moving on too...


    2001

    A. I. Artificial Intelligence - John Williams
    A Beautiful Mind - James Horner
    Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone - John Williams
    WINNER: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring - Howard Shore
    Monsters Inc. - Randy Newman


    Two huge scores went up against each other this year. Very tough call. I love the scores to both Potter and Rings. But I think the winner went to the right score. It was fresh and wonderful. At first when I bought the TFOTR soundtrack, I didn't like the score. I had been so used to the Williams style of scoring that this score seemed awkward to me. But it grew on me over time. I love the Nazghul music, the shire theme, the ring theme (or the main one), and especially the Lothlorien/Galadriel theme. So beautiful. Can't forget the music from the mines either when the Balrog arrives. Shore was awesome.

    Harry Potter was great too. Hedwigs theme for instance gets stuck in my head constantly. The Quiditch music too. I think the singing ghosts is good fun also.

    As for the others, A Beautiful Mind was okay. I didn't care much for the film, but the music was good.

    I frankly cannot remember the score to Monsters Inc. Just the song.

    A.I. should be taken off the nominations list though. It's far from Williams's best work and is overrated. Or maybe I'm delusional and need to watch the movie again because it's not memorable.

    Scores that didn't make it that year for good reason include Enemy At The Gates by James Horner, Shrek by Harry Gregson-Williams, and Gosford Park by Patrick Doyle.

    One's the could have made it include the Mummy Returns by Alan Silvestri, Pearl Harbor by Hans Zimmer, Spirited Away by Joe Hisaishi, and Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within by Elliot Goldenthal.

    But the one I would have liked to have seen replace A.I. would have been Mark Isham's score to Life As A House. That building a house theme got stuck in my head for weeks after watching that movie.



    So my nominations would have been...

    A Beautiful Mind - James Horner
    Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone - John Williams
    Life As A House - Mark Isham
    The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring - Howard Shore
    Monsters Inc. - Randy Newman

    ...with the win still going to TFOTR.
  11. TwiLekJedi Pretty Ex-Mod

    Member Since:
    Jun 14, 2001
    star 10
    Timo will rip you to shreds for the A.I. comment :p

    but I agree that Spirited Away could have gotten a nomination. I love it.

    However, it would have changed little, since I also absolutely agree that Shores FotR score won. Now even more so than back then because I'm sure I appreciated it later much more than at that time. It does have to grow on you, but once it does, you're in love.
    It just felt a lot more large-scale than any of the others.
  12. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6
    The right score won, as far as I'm concerned. The first Potter went waaaay overboard with Hedwig's Theme, but it does lay the foundations for the great Azkaban.

    A.I. seems to be a late bloomer. I've only heard it in-film, and wasn't blown away, but I've heard several people (including Timo, who is probably at this moment outside your house with steak knives) sing its praises recently.
  13. Strilo Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Aug 6, 2001
    star 8
    HLAS I will simply say that if you have not sat down and listened to the entire score for A.I., including the Oscar CD material as well, you have not heard the score properly. If you have not, you owe it to yourself to give this work a real fair listen. It is both a brilliant score and a major departure from Williams' usual style. I think it is in his top scores of the past 15 years easily.

    Now, 2001 is a year that I feel the Acadamy actually got RIGHT. All the scores nominated are wonderful. As I already said A.I. is simply stunning and a huge departure from Williams' usual work. "The Reunion," "Search for the Blue Fairy," "Stored Memories," "Rouge City," "The Mecha World," "Our Day" and "Abandoned in the Woods" are really standout tracks. The score is also very eclectic and diverse. A few moments stand out as clearly being John Williams but much of the score doesn't sound like him at all.

    A Beautiful Mind is a score I have heard parts of but not seen the film. What I have heard was really great. I do like Horner's work, when he is on.

    Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone is simply put, one of Williams best adventure scores ever. The SCALE of this thing is insane. The number of new themes that fill this plush and magical score is staggering. I cannot imagine the film without this music. Hedwig's Theme, the Harry's Wondrous World theme, the Hogwart's theme, the Gryffindor theme, the Stone's theme and several other themes are all integral to this magical and wonderfully entertaining score. For me it blends two of Williams' best scores ever, Hook and E.T., together to create a score truly deserving of an Oscar.

    Monsters Inc is a score I've only heard in the film and I have to say it works really well. Both score and film are excellent.

    Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. What I've said about this score can be read in the LOTR thread here. Shore's LOTR scores are my favorite non-John Williams scores out there. They are so rich with themes, so eclectic in arrangements and so moving emotionally. I love the different exotic instruments used. I love the myriad of very catchy and appropriate themes. This score came out of no where for me. When I heard who was scoring LOTR, my reaction was "who?" I'd never even heard OF Shore let alone heard any of his work. Later I realized he did the score for Dogma, but oh well. Anyway this score was such a huge surprise and SO excellent I felt it deserved the recognition and notoriety that comes with an Oscar. This is my pick, and shockingly the Acadamy's pick as well, for Best Original Score 2001.
  14. Well_Of_Souls Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 26, 2001
    star 5
    Shrek by Harry Gregson-Williams

    And John Powell, for the record. Although definitely not their best collaboration. That easily goes to Chicken Run.

    Also, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within was one of if not the best score of 2001 and deserved at least a nomination. Elliot Goldenthal is a truly unique composer who takes chances and has his own voice that makes a huge impression. Operatic, thematic, dissonant, beautiful, and haunting. FF:TSW is all those things and more.
  15. TwiLekJedi Pretty Ex-Mod

    Member Since:
    Jun 14, 2001
    star 10
    never heard that opinion before. musically, it may be as good as you say. trouble is, it didn't feel like Final Fantasy music ;) meaning, expectations always made me hesitant to give it much credit...
  16. Well_Of_Souls Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 26, 2001
    star 5
    Goldenthal and Uematsu are completely different composers and I understand the negative fan reaction to the score (and film) for not being like the games. But to me, if it's good music, it's good music. And this is some good music.
  17. KissMeImARebel Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 25, 2003
    star 4
    I'm with Strilo - they got it right in 2001.

    The score for FotR wasn't just great music, it was great music for the film - it evoked what was on the screen in ways that other great scores often fail to achieve.
  18. HL&S Magistrate Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2001
    star 6
    Though a day late...

    The nominations for the year 2000

    2000

    1. Chocolat - Rachel Portman
    2. WINNER: Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon - Tan Dun
    3. Gladiator - Hans Zimmer
    4. Malena - Ennio Morricone
    5. The Patriot - John Williams



    I've only heard four of the five nominations. Never heard Malena by Ennio Morricone.

    Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is a well rounded score and it deserved the nomination. The win though...it's a tough call as I'll explain later.

    Gladiator I think is pretty good for Hans Zimmer despite people tending to think it's overrated. Well deserved nomination. Best credit music of the year.

    Chocolat isn't Portman's best work, but it's a great score. The wind theme is very nice and I find myself getting into the gypsy music.

    The Patriot is okay. Like Portman, it's not Williams best work, the nomination could come or go with me though.


    What wasn't nominated this year?

    A Perfect Storm by James Horner for good reason. It simply isn't as good as the others.

    Dinosaur by James Newton Howard for bad reason. It is as good as the others and was totally overlooked. I only recently rediscovered this soundtrack thanks to the tracks thread.

    X-Men by Michael Kamen is so underrated. I don't understand why people dislike it so. I thought it was an excellent job from start to end.

    But the biggest snub for the year 2000 was the score to Requiem For A Dream by Clint Mansell. I think this was the best score of the year. It was so unique and the main theme just sticks in your brain. It's so melancholy and depressing. That movie wouldn't be half as good without this score. It really hits you.


    So my nominations would have gone...

    1. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon - Tan Dun
    2. Dinosaur - James Newton Howard
    3. Gladiator - Hans Zimmer
    4. Requiem For A Dream - Clint Manselll
    5. X-Men - Michael Kamen

    ...with Requiem taking the win.



    On a side note, I gotta mention the score to the made for television movie Dune by Graeme Revell. If only it was on the big screen...






    EDIT: Oh and now that we know that Brokeback Mountain won for the year 2005, I must express my anger. :mad: Poor Memoirs of a Geisha.
  19. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6
    Gladiator is a top score from Zimmer, and basically the only score of his that I actually like. And I like it a lot. It's pure rip-off from many other works, most notably Holst's "Mars" from The Planets, but I love it all the same.

    The Patriot is ho-hum.

    Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is an amazing score that is very much different from your regular nomination at the Oscars. I've had it for years and I still put it on for a spin. A deserved win, although I haven't heard Requiem For A Dream.
  20. HL&S Magistrate Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2001
    star 6
    If you've seen the trailer to the Two Towers, you've heard a fanfare version the main theme from Requiem For A Dream. But I HIGHLY recommend that you see the movie Requiem For A Dream.
  21. Paradise in Naboo Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 30, 1999
    star 4
    With the exception of 2001 and 2003, this was the last time Oscar got it right in this category. Crouching Tiger is a very lovely score.
  22. HL&S Magistrate Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2001
    star 6
    Without the nomination of Requiem For A Dream, I must disagree there.
  23. HL&S Magistrate Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2001
    star 6
    In the year 1999 the nominations were...


    1. American Beauty - Thomas Newman
    2. Angela's Ashes - John Williams
    3. The Cider House Rules - Rachel Portman
    4. WINNER: The Red Violin - John Corigliano
    5. The Talented Mr. Ripley - Gabriel Yared


    Tough year. Out of these nominations I'd say it was a close race between The Red Violin and American Beauty. Both John Corigliano and Thomas Newman did fantastic jobs. I really like Anna's Theme from the Red Violin. It's beautiful. Corigliano does a great job jumping from one land to another with great regional themes. Did it deserve the win? Yes. Out of these scores yes. Did Thomas Newman's score deserve the win? Yes. It's my favorite T Newman score. It's slightly depressing, but very beautiful.

    Angela's Ashes is a great score also. Another depressing score. Seemed to be a theme this year. But done is a wonderful way. It really elevated the movie. Suprised it wasn't nominated for best picture. Piano work and violins seemed to be pretty big this year as well.

    The Cider House Rules is solid. Like I've said before, I prefer Portman's earlier works over later ones but that's not to say she's slumping or anything. Haven't seen the movie itself in a long while though. Good film.

    I've seen the Talented Mr. Ripley but the score doesn't stand out to me. Yared does okay reminding us that we're in Italy and also that Ripley is psychotic with the music, but this score and Cider I wouldn't have nominated.


    Scores that weren't nominated include the Mummy by Jerry Goldsmith, the 13th Warrior by Jerry Goldsmith, the Matrix by Don Davis, Cruel Intentions by Craig Armstrong, Fight Club by the Dust Brothers, The Ninth Gate by Wojciech Kilar, and Wing Commander by David Arnold and James Newton Howard.

    Some were epics like the Mummy (good score) and Wing Commander (good main theme but hurt by a crappy movie) and some were haunting like Cruel Intentions and the Ninth Gate. Well I would have chosen a different epic and a different haunting score.

    Sleepy Hollow by Danny Elfman - I thought this was his best score since ANBC. The main theme is scary enough and the love theme is great. Best moment is when the Horsemen is heading towards the Church. Danny Elfman really picks it up then.

    The other of course is Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace by John Williams. Duel of the Fates, Anakin's Theme, the Trade Federation March, and almost every other track tell me that this should have been nominated and should have won. I'm Star Wars biased, but for good reason score wise. Sure there's reprises of old themes, but there's so much great new music. Great tragedy that this was neglected.

    My nominations would have gone...

    1. American Beauty - Thomas Newman
    2. Angela's Ashes - John Williams
    3. The Red Violin - John Corigliano
    4. Sleepy Hollow - Danny Elfman
    5. Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace - John Williams

    ...with Star Wars winning.
  24. KissMeImARebel Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 25, 2003
    star 4
    I've been waiting for 1999 to come around since the start of this thread.

    The Academy usually flubs it with Best Original Score, but this year they got it right hands down. =D=

    I had doubted that the Academy would be willing to give the Oscar to such a small film, but I was very proud when they did, because IMHO The Red Violin is probably one of the most brilliant scores ever written (it can't hurt either that Joshua Bell did all the solo work). It stands alone as a great work of music (especially the haunting main theme), but it also goes hand-in-hand with its film perfectly.
  25. HL&S Magistrate Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2001
    star 6

    Out of the 5 that were nominated, they picked the right one. But it doesn't overcome TPM for me.
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