Arena Penn State Abuse Scandal - State of PA Suing NCAA

Discussion in 'Community' started by Darth McClain, Nov 9, 2011.

  1. Jabba-wocky Chosen One

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    May 4, 2003
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    Would you deny that those "five or so individuals" were part of the senior leadership of the school, and that they acted as they did to preserve the reputation of their football program? How then is it unreasonable to remove the temptation of their football program to keep them from making such disastrous misjudgments in the future?
  2. Juliet316 Chosen One

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    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
    Don't bother Wocky, remember Arwan was the person on the Temp Boards who more or less implied that Sandusky's victims were golddiggers for suing him and Penn State.
  3. Jabba-wocky Chosen One

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    Oh, that was him? I knew this contours of this conversation seemed vaguely familiar, but I wasn't quite able to place it. Ye gods.
  4. Guinastasia Force Ghost

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    Jun 9, 2002
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    Oh god, someone seriously said that? That's sick.
  5. Juliet316 Chosen One

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    Exactly, hence why I opted not to engage with him.
  6. Arawn_Fenn Chosen One

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    Why is sentencing the guilty parties to jail not sufficient? Does that not in theory create a deterrent for the all-important future? Why punish the innocent along with the guilty, in some kind of misguided attempt to "remove temptation", whatever that means?

    Wouldn't the world be nice if there was no temptation? What kind of insane vision is that? And how would enforcing such a thing ever fail to run afoul of the law, as it did in this case?
  7. Guinastasia Force Ghost

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    Jun 9, 2002
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    Because they covered up a crime. They also committed perjury -- that's also a crime, btw.
    Juliet316 likes this.
  8. Juliet316 Chosen One

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    Apr 27, 2005
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    This. So very much this. Also that it's a fact that Sandusky committed at least one of his crimes and more than likely more than one child sex assault (possibly many more) on the university's campus with those in authority covering it up and then turning a blind eye to everything afterwards. I hope Spanier and the other two charged get the book thrown at them. As I said when I posted the link to Corbett's lawsuit, Penn State's lucky that the NCAA didn't just hand out the 'Death Penalty.' There are reports they were prepared to if Penn State hadn't accepted the scantions that were handed down.
    Last edited by Juliet316, Jan 5, 2013
  9. benknobi1 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2002
    star 6
    The sanctions are a load of crap. The NCAA used the Sandusky case to punish the entire Penn State community. Penn State, unlike Sandusky is actually made up of normal people that were forced to either kowtow to the NCAA or have to fight to get their program reestablished, but we didn't realize at the time that the sanctions would be worse than the death penalty. In fact, the NCAA might as well have given us the death penalty. The Sandusky affair is a criminal matter and the NCAA was not a victim. No one knew this unconscionable child molestation was going on, least of all the players who were banned from playing in bowl games. The sanctions and all the rehashing of this story doesn't bring any closure to the actual victims and their families. Not to mention that the 60 million in sanctions has had an adverse economic impact in State College, PA and the surrounding areas. Penn State Football can't even give the same amount of scholarships to football players as other schools. Penn State needs to be able to move forward and for things to return to normal when the juiciest piece of gossip was who Spanier was having an affair with.
    Arawn_Fenn likes this.
  10. solojones Chosen One

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    Sep 27, 2000
    star 9
    That is simply untrue. There were people in Penn State's football, athletic, and administrative offices that knew about it and let it keep going on. That's both a criminal matter and something that reflects poorly on the university, the sport, and the NCAA. I don't like a lot of things about the NCAA, but it seems to me that they have a point here. And trying to prevent that from happening at other schools is something they have a vested interest in.

    That being said, they may or may not have the legal right to distribute the fines to other states. I don't really know enough about that to make a judgment. I'm just saying let's not pretend that Penn State's officials are innocent victims here. The students are, and that really sucks for them losing scholarships and chances to play in bowls and such, but point the finger at their administration for putting their school in this shameful position, not at the NCAA.
    Juliet316 likes this.
  11. benknobi1 Chosen One

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    Jun 12, 2002
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    untrue? I used to work in the Penn State administrative offices and no one I worked with had any idea. If anyone knew hypothetically, it would have been a very small group of individuals with a lot of power in the University.

    That being said, Universities in general operate in "their own little world" and strive to project a "perfect" public image.
  12. Juliet316 Chosen One

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    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
    You just hit it on the head and invalidated your argument that nobody knew. Spanier, Graham, Curley, AND Paterno all knew and covered it up and/or turned a blantant blind eye to it. That's why Penn State is being punished. When you have powerful people abusing their power to the determent of other people (in this case innocent, defenseless children), there has to be consequences for it.
  13. Arawn_Fenn Chosen One

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    Jul 2, 2004
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    Like I said, that makes all of five people. Punishing an entire community of thousands for the actions of five people is not a moral act, and is probably not even legal in this case.

    There were. Paterno was fired. Sandusky is in jail. Spanier, Curley and Schultz await trial. There don't have to be consequences for people who had nothing to do with it.
    Last edited by Arawn_Fenn, Jan 6, 2013
    benknobi1 likes this.
  14. Jabba-wocky Chosen One

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    May 4, 2003
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    Yes also guys why is the international community trying to oust Bashar Al-Assad. Is it fair to punish an entire community of thousands for the actions of one guy and his dad? It is not a moral act, and is probably not even legal in this case.
  15. Arawn_Fenn Chosen One

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    I think a better analogy would be Iraq.
  16. solojones Chosen One

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    When leaders do bad things, their communities suffer for it. It's one of the responsibilities leaders take on and a reason people should take their leadership positions more seriously. The guys at Penn State covered it up while knowing full well what the reaction would be if they did that and people found out. This shouldn't be a surprise to them. But they decided to put protecting a pedophile over all of this. Be angry with them, not with the reaction.
    Juliet316 likes this.
  17. Arawn_Fenn Chosen One

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    Jul 2, 2004
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    So punish the five people responsible ( which has already happened or is in the process of happening ). Don't punish everyone else. The vast majority of the community covered up nothing, had no part in what happened, and didn't know anything was happening in the first place.
  18. benknobi1 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 12, 2002
    star 6
    Still, the NCAA is not the appropriate place to punish criminal wrongdoing. The NCAA is where you go for something like the 2010 Ohio State Football cheating/paying college players thing. The most the NCAA should have done was release a statement expressing condolences for the victims and their families and leave the rest to the courts. I am angry with our "Penn State leaders" and I am angry that the reaction condemns the entire penn state community. When the news of this first broke, we were all in shock and most people couldn't even bring themselves to talk about it. It was unreal. I was on my way to play in an intramural sports game at the time. When I got there everyone had tears in their eyes including myself... long story short it was one of the worst nights of my life. Also, as a side note, it's probably a good thing the trial was held in Bellefonte and not in State College, otherwise there very well may have been rioting.
  19. Jabba-wocky Chosen One

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    May 4, 2003
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    I don't see how one is any better than the other. Is there something wrong with the Syrian example?

    Many soldiers in the Syrian armed forces have been wounded or killed in attacks by people whom they never personally did anything against or even wished ill. They are all being punished for the actions of one guy. Do you no longer agree that this is deeply immoral?
    Last edited by Jabba-wocky, Jan 6, 2013
  20. benknobi1 Chosen One

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    I think we all can agree that both are deeply immoral.
  21. Juliet316 Chosen One

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    Does that justify Assad using chemical weapons on his own people. Never mind the fact that the Syrian protests started somewhat peacefully before Assad turned his military on his people, including bombing them from the sky.
  22. Juliet316 Chosen One

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  23. Juliet316 Chosen One

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  24. burrisjedimaster1 Force Ghost

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    Jul 31, 2002
    star 4
    59.7 million is not enough for the 26 settlements!
  25. Juliet316 Chosen One

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