Fanclub Peter Cushing Fan Club

Discussion in 'Star Wars Community' started by Cushing's Admirer, Dec 31, 2013.

  1. Cushing's Admirer Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2006
    star 6
    Antlers: That is awesome right there! Very talented. I am glad to welcome another Sir fan. :D How were you introduced to him? Was it recently? I saw your Tarkin the other day. Very thought-provoking!
  2. A Chorus of Disapproval New Films Riot Deterrent

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Aug 19, 2003
    star 7
    That is completely brilliant. Fine, fine work.
  3. Cushing's Admirer Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2006
    star 6
    I am finally starting to formulate ideas for my latest and hopefully the last attempt at writing a tribute story that focuses on my perceptions and thoughts about Sir and a handful of other performers. It is not a Real Person fic nor is it fan fic. It will be an original story with fantasy and scifi elements with strong moral tones. In the course of it I will not only be rebuilding my universe but studying my major character templates in depth and carefully.

    In hopes of beginning the process, I have started a document in which I will detail my thoughts on major aspects/traits of Peter that I admire and from it I may take some or all traits and infuse them with my Peter tribute characters as the story permits. Thus far there are two, first cousins. This endeavour may well take several years to produce a completed draft but it is my dearest wish to finally honour Peter's memory as I have yearned to do for years.

    I am curious, if you chose 1 to 4 traits that you have seen Cushing display through his work or in interviews that you feel are truly part of the man, what would they be?

    For me they include: nerves, a tactile nature, transparency, anxiety, humour, empathy, and an athletic streak.
  4. A Chorus of Disapproval New Films Riot Deterrent

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Aug 19, 2003
    star 7
    I will absolutely contribute to this. I simply require time to compile the most worthwhile list of attributes.
    Shira A'dola likes this.
  5. Cushing's Admirer Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2006
    star 6
    *Nods* Thank you, Mike. I look forward to it. :)
  6. Shira A'dola Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Sep 4, 2012
    star 6
    I look forward to your list Mike :D
  7. LAJ_FETT Tech Admin and Collecting/Games Mod

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    May 25, 2002
    star 9
    A note for Hammer Horror fans in the UK - the Horror Channel will be running Hammer Double Bills on Saturday nights starting Feb 1. First up are Dracula: Prince of Darkness and Scars of Dracula. You can get more information in their TV Guide section.
  8. Cushing's Admirer Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2006
    star 6
    *Cushy enters and posts her two current tribute efforts to Sir*

    Honest Heart-Elder:
    Lora Price aka Cushing Fan

    When I first properly discovered you the first thing that struck me were your uniquely sharply-defined facial features. Then, I fell into the same trap that the studios appear to have forced you to endure: that you looked severe. I don’t think I’ve ever seen more prominent cheekbones in my life or as sunken a cheek. Yet, what always captivated me and drew me to push past any trepidation regarding your appearance were your eyes. The first and for many years the sole visual of you I knew was of Wilhuff Tarkin in The Star Wars. Yep, I was a sci-fi/fantasy nerd all my formative years. I was born in 1982 and likely first saw you at 7-8 at my first of *countless* Star Wars viewings. I memorised the blasted thing. I was always drawn to you but I didn’t understand why. I simply thought it was awesome that you absolutely *owned* the giant in the black suit. Tarkin struck me as sad. His washed out grey-blue eyes were so naked. I have never viewed Tarkin as the monster so many gleefully do. Even Mr Lucas himself has said he wanted a ‘human face to represent Evil’. How terrible that filmmakers have misused you so wantonly!

    You were very much both the dreamer and the dream. Indeed the more I learn of you I think you are likely the most properly child-like man I’ve ever seen. So many worthy lessons that you teach simply by being yourself. So clear for those that bother to pay attention. Such a marvellous gentleness in manner as well. The first time I ever heard you speak as yourself, a sample of Past Forgetting, I believe, I was floored how different it was to Tarkin. You show that being soft spoken and slow to speak are very worthy traits indeed. You are a very effective speaker. I absolutely find the difference in your delivery between speaking as yourself versus speaking a line, precious. I like both but you natural better. You’re so adorable. Your stammer melts my heart. I take no joy that you appear to find words to a degree difficult. None at all, I just admire that when permitted you are absolutely yourself—that you do not hide away. You appear to have virtually no pride, a marvellous example, and you admit your humanity readily.

    It was thorough your books that I learned of your unfortunate origin to your unsought addiction to smoking. Well done in finally breaking her hold upon you in 1989. You were a living testament of never giving up and I highly admire you for this all the more because I trust that you had many near calls. The world was blessed the 81 years and roughly 2 and a half months you walked upon it.

    I find it very offensive that so many among the ‘public’ judge the character and the man that portrays him together as though you literally *are* the character in reality. I was guilty of this myself for awhile. I was such a fanciful dreamer that I didn’t discern between the world of fiction and reality until I was 9. That day came when I called out in distress to my Mum: ‘Is he really dead? Upon hearing my favourite Star Trek character ever, Sarek of Vulcan had died in a 1991 episode. With an amazing lack of sympathy my Mum set me straight and I have been very aware of the difference ever since. I felt like I lost the same being twice as his actor, Mark Lenard, died in 1996 of bone marrow cancer.

    It disturbs me how many seem to celebrate everything that is amoral in a film or specific character like it somehow make it cool or ‘badass’. I particularly have seen some very detailed fan works of your Van Helsing but they make me sad as it seems so many just ignore or plain don’t see the heart of humanity you *infuse* into your characters, especially these. They seem merely to think it’s so cool to hold you up as a vampire slayer or a lady killer seemingly blind to the fact in some fashion you telegraph you don’t want to do it. The public likewise very often dehumanises performers, treating them as unrelatable idols. This is wrong and it makes my heart ache how shallow of a society we now live in.

    For many you are solely acknowledged as an actor. I think it is so sad that so few dare or bother to discover the man behind their ‘innocent thrills’. Many that have read your words as I have seem to think you focus too much on what mattered to you and too little on what mattered to them.. I find this deplorable! Since when did anyone gain the right to tell another how to speak his or her heart? I am a writer myself and it just boggles me that so many readers seem to openly declare that the only reason a writer writes is money and that thus the reader must be catered to. This is so wrong. I for one applaud greatly that An Autobiography is a love story. It is a very seldom thing to see a man willing to admit his errors and flaws yet always continue towards perfection. You adored your Missus, that *radiates* majestically from your pages and your speech. Love is most worthy. Thank you for so courageously sharing your tale with the world even though you had no intention to do so, originally.

    I likewise adore learning of your passions and hobbies. Such a lover of life and nature. The impish humour. The circumspect speech. The multi-talented artist: painter, modeller, drawer, student of birds, lover of games, compassionate connector to others. The enthusiast of model figures, silk ties, and walking sticks. The athletic man, slight and lean with the agility and grace of a cheetah. The man that never quite outgrew his sweet tooth.

    I yearn earnestly for the day when you and your Beloved, Helen, live again. I will be so joyous when all your doubts, fears, and guilt is banished forever. You bore it so bravely, Sir. In a fast approaching dawn, you shall join so very many of your Human brethren in finally discovering peace. Should the Almighty grant me the opportunity I will ecstatically seek you and ask to shake your hand and tell you that I love you deeply as a mentor, an example, and the answer to a heartfelt prayer. You found your rest five days before I turned 12 and I consider it well earned. I am relieved that your fragile spirit is no longer tormented.

    Dedicated in loving memory of Peter Cushing, O. B. E. (1913-1994)
    ------------------------------------------------------------

    Trait Analysis

    Core Senses: In my time studying and observing him, Sir seems very keyed to his core senses. The two he seems to rely on most are Sight and Touch. It is interesting that as is the case with all major senses these two you can utilise to both receive and give information.

    Sight seems to be the principle way that Peter gains, gathers, and processes information. It is also I believe the sense through which much of his appreciation for aesthetic beauty is founded. It is usually the way he'd likely discern if someone needed aid as well. He did not hear well due to injury while sporting when young and I have the impression went nearly totally deaf at least in one ear. Even in some performances you can see him cant his head in a telling motion. I believe he even does it with Carrie in ANH.

    Touch: I believe it is heavily through touch that Peter communicates on the whole. He isn't inclined to speech at all and is very uncertain. He stammers most endearingly. He's shy and tends to fall back on humour either as a deflector or as a tension breaker. I believe it is chiefly through touch, that Peter goes about his work of helping others heal and find their sense of belonging.

    On the flip side, Sir seems perhaps not to be able to process the written word well and relies greatly on tactile contact with props particularly during films/work during his grieving period of 1971-1984. I think touch grounded him and may have even helped him recall information.

    Child-Like: Peter is a very trusting soul. I don't think he wishes to think ill of anyone. He is always seeking guidance, asking questions. He is goofy, curious about nearly everything particularly if it is nature related or studying people. He has a special love and care for birds. Very eager to please others, unsuspecting, innocent of heart, given to service. Inclined to humour, games, and helping others. Not afraid to admit he doesn’t know something.

    Anxiety: I can so empathise with him. I share this trait. I think like with me, it is part of his personality. We are both very much homebodies with an acute need for stability and usually 'home' The Barn (what he called his house in Kent) and this rundown trailer home for me provides it.

    In Peter's case, I believe his anxiety stems from an acute fear that he'll fail. 'Forty and a Failure' is a chapter title of his and the lovely sentiment is issued by his Father. Not only is he worried he'll fail at achieving what his project is, he frets that he'll never measure up in Father's eyes, I think. Father is a banker or big business man and Peter is the Artistic Dreamer that paints. It doesn’t exactly mesh and when he asks for help to come to America to go to Hollywood trying to start acting professionally, Father does help a bit but slaps son in the face figuratively by only getting Peter a one-way ticket.

    Once he weds Helen, she basically becomes his world and I mean that literally. His anxiety now shifts slightly to include concern over his wife's increasing medical bills (Helen nearly dies before they even meet and is badly ill and frail the whole time they are together).

    I don't really think Peter is all that concerned about failing *himself* but falling short of expectations and fulfilling others' needs.

    I think he fears the unknown amid a world he understands is not as it ought to be.

    Meticulous/Particular/Thorough: I believe all these traits are linked. I think both due to his essential need for balance and order but likewise that it is linked to his artistic side of being detail-conscious, These factors, I feel are vital to his sense of being prepared and capable of offering his very best to all he works for, with, or seeks to aid.

    Devotion/Honesty/Loyalty: These are central to how he regards and handles people. He strives to treat them with care and honour.

    Transparency: This is the trait almost above any other that makes me think Peter was a powerful male empath. I do not think he possesses any natural shielding to guard his tender loving heart. He is very true to himself in whatever he does in some fashion. I think Peter possesses a very highly developed personal code of conduct. He is very courageous yet as nearly unflashy as you can get. He has one of the most open and expressive faces I’ve seen in my life. He can’t hide a thing and honestly I doubt he would want to such is his dedication to honesty. The only thing I think Peter would desire to erase/minimise is the concern and suffering he causes others (particularly during his mourning). This coupled with his honesty and his empathy enables him to be a superb teacher, I think.

    Sorrow: Peter understands the grief and the pain of making bad decisions and poor choices. Thankfully, he chooses to turn his suffering and errors into examples to warn and teach others. If we only listen.

    Humility: Peter seems to have virtually no traditional sense of pride. I find this incredible and very commendable. He is a very teachable, willing, curious spirit. He accepts and seeks correction, guidance, and clarification. He does as others desire on the whole and as a standard rule. He is willing to serve and openly generous and affectionate. Most of the time I have the impression he did not abide the ‘Star’ treatment. He is well known to be the one that prepares and distributes drinks or snacks to his fellows while working, he and his wife are hospitable to friends, strangers, and children. Peter is approachable and welcoming. He did not seek attention or praise. Honestly, you watch the fellow deal with attention or adoration from anyone fan or friend, and Peter is completely dumbfounded and so preciously thrilled that anyone would deem him worthy of recognition. I strongly suspect he only accepts his (well-deserved IMO) OBE because to do otherwise would disrespect or upset those that had summoned him. (He had to delay as he was in hospital at the time due to a cycling accident in which he swerved to avoid hitting a dog and he broke his hip). He truly seems to live to bring others happiness.

    Long Suffering/Patient: Okay, this one at heart is really linked to the nearly indisputable impression that darling Sir can’t abide conflict. Good grief, this poor man. Constantly surrounded by tensions and stresses particularly of others. I truly believe Peter was long suffering and patient in large part because he desires greatly to ease others burdens. One has the impression he endures quite a lot especially at studio hands but most of the time he simply accepts it and fulfils his duty. He does have the ability to correct others as well as accept such in return but he is usually very, very mild and gentle in approach even if his words do convey depth of impact. He’s a very even-keel guy at heart. I think it’s also linked to his need for balance and his desire and striving to foster harmony. Peter has to be pushed quite far to get him upset and even when he is, it’s over in a flash. He sorts it out, then he forgets it. He is stated for never holding a grudge and that if he’s upset with you there is *cause*. I think this is quite a testament to Sir’s character.

    Builder/Creator: For me this is two fold: one is his artistic talents and the other are his people skills.

    Artistically, I have the impression he is nearly always doing something: he paints many watercolours particularly of nature which he loves and respects greatly. The main messages of his paintings that I have seen thus far seems to be beauty, serenity, gravity, and respect. He probably starts doodling/drawing about the time he starts acting in the back garden (very young I think between 4-7). If the work is pen or pencil he often adds a hint of humour to the work. A set of symbols or a short phrase. He makes model mini sets of productions he is involved in, I suspect not only is it to release creativity but to channel his nerves and ground himself in what he is currently engaging with.

    Regarding his people skills I see Peter as what I call a Connector. An individual wired/made/purposed to help foster, forge, and repair relationships. I think he strives very hard to be peaceable and assist others in manners that will unlock or showcase their own talents.

    Comforter/Empathy/Mender: Peter is very keyed to people’s states, particularly emotionally speaking I believe. He seems to be drawn to or seek out any that he senses are in distress desiring to understand the cause, usually ends up being a listener to the individual’s circumstances to a degree and then he will do what he can to settle the person. I believe he has a very quiet and meek spirit and he is a man of action. He shows how he feels through actions much more than spoken words. He seems quite the affectionate one. Willing to offer a friendly or steadying hug, a soothing touch, a gentle smile, a gleeful grin, a kind look.

    Romantic: When I say he's romantic I mean that he seems to have a very old-fashioned but well-informed respect for women. He values us, particularly our intelligence. This is most strongly shown with how he treats/addresses his Lady, Helen. He's genuine in how he deals with them, he is willing to listen, acknowledge when someone is more apt than he is regardless of gender without any hint of resentment. He also does little gestures that nearly seem unheard of in these modern days: standing whenever someone enters a room and he's aware of it, he is well known for his double-handed handshake when greeting or engaging men or his kissing of a lady's hand when meeting or engaging them. He is romantic to me in the sense that he seems to have a manner of another time and he's completely open and unashamed about it.

    Agility: I had no idea the man that played Tarkin was such a natural mover or so an active one! For one with such large feet (nearly Size 13 by his own admission) he was very light-footed. I originally called Zadok/Peter my Cheetah because he has such fluid natural grace of motion. Particularly running. Most of the time when working he always reins himself in to a degree and rather obviously so he doesn't hinder the camerawork or seem to outpace his fellow in the scene. Whooo, when I see him walk or run as Van Helsing, Frankenstein or in Corruption I am in awe. Built for speed and nimbleness Peter was. He even runs very fast and well on an uneven beach. Peter likewise shows that lean muscle can indeed be very *strong* muscle. He doesn't really look strong or tough but I think he was in a sense. He loved to climb trees, skip from boulder to boulder to cross a stream, to cycle, swim, he even looks occasionally that he may be a vaulter of some kind. He looks to leap fences or climb them with ease.

    Frankenstein Created Woman is probably my second fave showcase of how Sir moves and his reflexes are *fast*.

    Shy/Quiet: think his empathetic nature, his anxiety, need for home and stability, his nerves and his quietness are all linked. I think he's shy partly due to being uncertain in speech. I think he's quiet due to that and because he loathes to disturb or upset anyone. You watch him in basically any interview particularly if it's 1980's or onwards he's very concerned he's bothering people--wasting their time, not making sense. He is also marvellously open and mildly corrective. I think Sir understood how to teach *gently* and he did by his example.
  9. Antlers Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2012
    star 1
    I just finished watching the 1954 BBC version of "1984", and damn, was it good! The acting is very genuine, which makes the film all the more horrifying. Julia's actress is absolutely gorgeous, and I'm probably going to have nightmares involving Andre Morell's O'Brien.

    Another viewer remarked how prim Cushing is in this role - you could nearly mistake him for Tarkin at times.

    You can view it in it's entirety on YouTube:




    (Currently watching "Horror Express"!)
  10. Cushing's Admirer Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2006
    star 6
    I though Andre and Peter were superb in both 1984 and Cash on Demand. Though I would never accuse Smith of being Tarkin-like.
  11. Antlers Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2012
    star 1
    It's more of a movement and carriage thing. Where and how he holds tension.
    I'm a dancer, so I'm weird like that. :p
  12. Cushing's Admirer Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2006
    star 6
    Ah. But that isn't what you said. :p He does have very consistent aspects to him through his work. The way he moves and the way he conveys tension are some of them. He also is quite a mover. :D
  13. Malcolm Reynolds Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2013
    star 5
    Cushing was not only a great actor but a great man it is nice to see him remembered so well
  14. Polydroxol Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jan 27, 2014
    star 2
  15. Cushing's Admirer Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2006
    star 6
    Thank you! Why, I have, yes! Cool rec for fellow Peter fans. :)

    I am shifting around elements for my tribute to Sir and my boys. I may even start the offical writing today! :D
    Malcolm Reynolds and Polydroxol like this.
  16. Malcolm Reynolds Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2013
    star 5
    he was such a great sherlock.
  17. Cushing's Admirer Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2006
    star 6
    In the last several months as part of my healing process I have written some short write ups pertaining to how I see Sir and what I have learned from him. Here are a couple of them.

    The Creeping Flesh: (1973):

    Though it is one of my favourite performances of yours, for some unnameable reason, it is likewise the one that makes me the saddest. It breaks my heart. Yes, even more than the ones in which you commit suicide on camera. Your honesty and transparency is truly awing. You’re hiding in plain sight aren’t you, Luv? You’re broken heart and anguish so clear to see. Yet as you even say in the part of Emmanuel ‘You see. You see with your own eyes. They all *see* but no one *believes*.’ Well, Dear One, I wasn’t even alive when you did this. I didn’t see it until years after you’d gone to rest in the earth. If I could, I’d reach out to you and tell you what you need to hear: I do see and I believe you. I am so grateful your anguish has ceased at long last.

    So many things you confess in your books, you visually do here with the aide of dialogue I suspect strongly you probably rewrote yourself. I am rather surprised one of those things is that ‘you shouldn’t lie, here’s why’. Very courageous that you take this stance as Emmanuel pertaining to lying to your daughter about her mother being dead for over 20 years. Wow. Emmanuel is in a state of constant fear and stress that Penelope may well end up ill as your beloved had. His intention is pure, shielding and protection. Even so, Emmanuel eventually admits that he was indeed wrong to have done so. I respect that. You admit errors both in RL and in character that you might teach and protect others from folly through gentleness and soft frankness.

    It’s embarrassing to realise I’ve seen this about five times now and only now do I realise I misread the whole middle sequence of this. Oh, so adorable to see your sincere romanticism shown when Emmanuel kisses his Lady after her show. Then she snaps and frightens him to death, tearing his heart asunder as she cries helplessly for him to help her.

    Wow, I have seen you convey two distinct but perfectly melded contextual messages in a scene before but this was a first: you did the whole thread of being a father: protective, traditionalist, devoted and finally upset (all out in this one too, you such a mild soul, that’s rare. You even permit tears. I know you did weep but to show it on camera that’s only here of all 50+ parts I’ve seen.)

    In spite of Emmanuel’s words, he wasn’t angry. He was wounded, betrayed that his daughter would defy him in this one thing that he *needed* for himself.

    Penelope acted as though Father was an oppressive and stifling man. Then she dared to fit at him pronouncing him insufferable and unloving.

    Peter’s guilt complex is plain as day as Emmanuel from not being there when his Lady died to lying to his daughter to Emmanuel realising he’d been a bit harsh in keeping her inside in his absence. Emmanuel’s disapproval of ‘romance literature’ I find adorably so Peter.

    Then when Emmanuel is out all night with not a wink of sleep dashing about the city searching for his daughter…Penelope gets raped. I honestly am not sure if Emmanuel knows that though. Rape is too over used in these pictures. There is more than one ‘horror’ women can and do know. Same with the whole ‘a lass can’t handle anything, we men must sedate her so we can talk reasonably among ourselves’ line. Ugh. Even Peter does it sometimes and it makes me shake my head. I know that’s *them* not him. It’s still annoying.

    Though Peter is so precious whenever he comes to a distressed lass and touches and cradles her to soothe her. Such a gentle heart.

    There is a pair of scenes that showcases Christopher and Peter’s deep trust and the difference in their wiring: James barks at Emmanuel and essentially Emmanuel cowers and submits. Then, later, Emmanuel is desperate. Emmanuel rushes up to his younger and taller half-brother in a state nearly ready to shake him. Instead, he simply grasps the material of James’ coat and presses against/touches his chest.

    Though it is meant that James and Emmanuel are displeased with each other, I now realise that Chris is steady for his beloved Peter and he is *silent*. He no longer barks at him. I suspect Chris learned real fast that Peter didn’t do well with ‘loud and reactive’. Their friendship is lovely to behold. Such trust, such respect.

    In seriousness, I am surprised Emmanuel doesn’t smoke and I commend Peter’s restraint in this on camera especially given the time frame. I was startled to see Peter ride a horse here. He does that very rarely. I recall he says he has trepidation of the horse though he doesn’t dislike them. The way Peter continually faces his fears is awe-inspiring!

    I notice that here as he does in a few pictures of the time period, Peter is constantly touching something. It’s precious and so telling. Tactility is his peace, his anchor, I think. It helped things make sense.

    Finally, the breakdown: Bless Peter for his courage! Very few men are willing to convey such absolute vulnerability on camera. I cannot imagine it was easy to do. I am glad that once again Christopher came to him and did not bark but respected his need for silence and release standing rather at guard over Peter as the shattered Emmanuel.

    I am so glad and grateful that Peter and Chris were granted the bond they were. I do not pretend that I am wholly right in my assessments but they are earnest and made with genuine consideration and respect.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A Tale of Two Cities (1980):

    I’m so relieved to see you had at least three projects in which you were essentially permitted to be yourself in your years of widowerhood, misery, and recovery, Sir. How sweet! You return to the recorded medium that you began with in the ‘50s—television as the 1980s dawn. :) I think the fact you do a fair bit of tv work as your career begins winding down shows though you saw the divisions between tv and film ‘groups’ you didn’t abide or condone them. Which I applaud heartily.

    Likewise, I see that you’ve returned to doing straight drama. With the close of the most difficult and turbulent 1970s, you bid farewell to these lousy fairy stories that most insist on calling ‘horror’. Well done indeed!

    Whoever comprised the team that worked with you on this production, I thank them. At least on screen nearly all treated you decently and conducted themselves in a manner that would soothe and anchor you without being rude or jarring about it. Much of which either was already present in Alexander as a character or infused within him by you and accepted by your fellows. You’re utter vulnerability and heartbreaking awe at the visage of your daughter within that room following 16 years of separation is actually beautiful to behold not for your suffering but because for once it is the lass that permits you touch and holds you close. Granting you the chance at last to be the one sheltered and tended. So tender. Saw your eyes were amazingly vibrant, I’m glad. Your eyes always say so much as does your open stark face.

    Your precious heart is starting to mend from its unspeakable wounds just in time for your body to start steadily betraying you, poor darling. Such a courageous heart at the centre of a fragile, loving spirit. I believe this is chronologically the first performance in which you evidence clearly that your agility and ability to move freely is being robbed. Several times Alexander is bodily supported, coaxed, and steadied when he most move. Likewise I see you do actually *use* your walking stick a few times for balance. By the look of you, the cancer is likely already raging within your body you simply don’t have the label yet. Always striving to give no matter the cost.

    I really enjoy this story which is a nice change from your 1970s work. You are a widower here as you very often are post-losing your Love, but you aren’t alone. You have an adult daughter and I love that you are both shown openly to be devoted to one another. Even better, the young French suitor sees your bond and *honours* it. So nice to see a story wherein loyalty, trust, and truth meant something. This clearly is a romance drama but a clean one which I respect immensely. Honestly, I weary of wring sexual content in your work. This was a nice different path from the gratuitous flesh and nonsense we both find distasteful. Though I love the mirth in your ageing eyes when you watch the younglings together. You remember love’s wonder. :D

    I love that even yet here, you work with your hands as a shoemaker. You are permitted stretches of quietude much more naturally for you here than other projects. Silence truly does suit you. Your voice is marvellously soft and gentle and your words usually circumspect and well chosen but you say what you feel so gorgeously through your expressions and body language. It’s so wonderfully *you*. Yet, here, you likewise convey your willingness to do even things that greatly unnerve you so that you might help another. Here that thing is indeed *speaking*. A public rallying speech when seeking your way to the Bastille to free your son-in-law, confronting the jailer multiple times insisting on answers and decent treatment for Charles, even a lovely chat with a mate that knows you have your fits of stupor over the past traumas of prison’s loneliness.

    I adore the French suitor coming to you seeking your lass’ hand and you do something I imagine is very you: you grant consent to tell her his feelings and indeed to wed BUT you grant the girl final say. That is classy of you, Sir. I doubt that was often done in the Era but you, romantic you are, so willing to grant a lady power with no dread of harm.

    You not only have a daughter but gain a son-in-law and a granddaughter. So nice to see you for once in a content familial state. Yet, the second trial and imprisonment of your son-in-law was sad. To have your journal used not only to damn you but also to damn the boy you love dearly. Ouch, Sir. Your face just shades over and you wilt as you close your eyes. I bet you did not even remember your wrote those horrid words amid your misery. Yet, such a poetic set of lessons beautifully conveyed be careful of your words they may impact later and the two of you mend the breech instantly. No grudges, no grandstanding or posturing. Just admission of folly and the salve of genuine affection. I admire greatly that you understood what natural affection was and offered it openly.
  18. Malcolm Reynolds Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2013
    star 5