Planets and gravity in star wars

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by mikethedbking, Jun 28, 2005.

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  1. mikethedbking Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    May 31, 2005
    I don't want to overanalyze (wait a minute, thats all we do here) but, are all the planets in the star wars saga the same size and density? Or is there some magical aura that gives all the planets the 'same pull of gravity?' like, FOR EXAMPLE, (note: FOR EXAMPLE) we can pretend that tatooine and coruscant are different sizes. wouldn't the physics be different? They don't seem to be at all.
  2. DarthSyphus Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 26, 2005
    star 1
    Remember how Han and Leia walk inside the belly of the space slug in ESB? Well, obviously the gravity of a small asteroid is much smaller, yet this is not shown.
  3. fettmaster39 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 9, 2005
    star 3
    yeah, there's alot of stuff like that in SW.

    its kinda funny.

    like, there is no sound in space, but we hear all the
    lasers and stuff....
  4. darth-narco Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jun 28, 2005
    hey all,

    well, apart from the asteroid scene which is obviously wrong, unless that particular asteroid is MASSIVE, which i dont think it is, i reckon most of the planets are of simialr size - it'd pretty much be a prerequisite for the development of human sized bi-pedal life anyhow. Lighter gravity, taller slender. Heavy gravity - short , squat, strong. I guess the Hutts home probably has stronger gravity etc etc


  5. DarthBoba Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 29, 2000
    star 9
    I just assume that somehow, the SW galaxy's gravity continues through space with just enough pull to hold down an atmosphere. which would explain why Han & Leia go out with some breath masks, and why Rebel pilots evidently feel comfortable with a flight suit like terrestrial-bound pilots where.

    Also, the clone pilot who gets blown outta his ship in ROTS doesn't explode.
  6. Darth-Kevin-Thomas Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Sep 27, 2002
    star 5
    well, it doesnt depend on size it depends on mass

    dkt
  7. mikethedbking Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    May 31, 2005
    So all the planets have exactly the same mass?

    In my first post I said 'given size and mass' or something.
  8. Rogue...Jedi Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jan 12, 2000
    star 7
    Gravity depends on size and mass - proportional to the mass and inversely proportional to the square of the radius (assuming one is on the surface). However, since most planets are of a roughly similar size and mass, they have a similar gravity, although it would still be distinct for each planet.
  9. EmperorKreptis Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jun 29, 2005
    I think it would be best not to think about it too much...you are going to make your heads hurt...
  10. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
    Given the not-real-science of controlling gravity on spacecraft, I'd say the Falcon's gravity field extends outside the hull as well so they walked around on the asteroid as if they we within their own confortable gravity.

    The Ewok flyer indicated less gravity since such small wings would not support an ewok sized anything in Earth gravity.
  11. DS615 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 30, 2003
    star 4
    What do we see that leads you to this idea?
    From what we see on screen, Coruscant can have 0.8g and Tatooine can have 1.8g. There's nothing to say either way.

    The only evidence of non-Earth gravity would be the Ewok glider example from above, and even that's dubious since the catapults and falling objects all seem to work like they would on Earth.
  12. master_ghost Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 29, 2005
    star 1
    It's a galaxy far far away. It's gonna be alot different.
  13. jangoisadrunk Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 7, 2005
    star 4
    Also, the clone pilot who gets blown outta his ship in ROTS doesn't explode.

    Actually, recent research suggests one would NOT explode if exposed to the vacuum of space, and that the whole concept of explosive decompression is wrong. This research (I saw this on the Science Channel or something in the last couple of years) suggests that a person would still die very quickly as all their bodily fluids boil away, though. I think I'd rather just explode. [face_skull]
  14. Lt_Murgen Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jun 14, 2005
    The thing to keep in mind is that all of the worlds visited in any of the films all had an atmosphere suitable for human life. From Mustafar to Hoth, all were breathable by humans. This implies certain things - temperature, presence of water and living things, etc.
    The galaxy is vast, containing many stars, and having the potential for nearly unlimited planets. But astrophysists contend that the criteria for a 'terrestrial' world are fairly narrow:
    mass: to low and you can't keep an atmosphere, too high and you get high denisty liquification of the key gasses.
    stellar location: too close to sun - atmosphere boil-off, too far, not enough 'fuel' for plant life.

    etc. [I am no astrophysist]

    So slight variances in gravity are likely, as are daylight hours, and length of year. But too large or too small, and it is not suitable for habitation.
  15. mikethedbking Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    May 31, 2005
    Now that is a good answer. Thanks :)
  16. DarthButt Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jun 11, 2003
    star 5
    Or a thicker atmosphere
  17. Satchel_Marr Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jun 20, 2005
    I always loved the following explanation for the explanation of sounds in space in Star Wars:

    Starships are programmed with sensors that translate external information to the interior of a ship via speakers.

    Example: A TIE Fighter flies past and lets loose a couple laser blasts that barely miss the Millenium Falcon. Han, Leia, and Chewie are in the cockpit. The Falcon's sensors identify the TIE fighter and apply the appropriate "screaming engines" in surround-sound and even the appropriate volume of the sound of a near-miss with lasers.

    Now, this doesn't explain exterior shots where we hear sounds in space, only when we're inside a ship. But it's still a neat idea.
  18. jangoisadrunk Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 7, 2005
    star 4
    Would the amount of metallic structures on Courascant (or any other GFFA "city-world" planet) change the planet's mass enough to affect its gravitational pull?

    Quick, someone call Dr. Michiro Kaku!

    Me = :-B
  19. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
    If the mass of the city-scape came from off world, then it might add some small amount to the gravity well of the planet. If it was all created from the resources of Coruscant itself, then no additional gravity is added since it was already there.
  20. Tyson Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Apr 8, 2005
    star 3
    Good point.
  21. jangoisadrunk Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 7, 2005
    star 4
    Yes, very good point.

    I don't see any way Courascant could have gotten away with NOT using off world materials in the construction of the galactic city, however. I don't thing any SINGLE planet would contain enough resources to construct something that immense.
  22. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
    There's plenty if used the right way. You have to get rid of any thought about our own means of manufacturing. Efficient smart/superstrong/lightweight materials, methods of fabrication, time of building, all these things surpass what we are capable of by many orders of magnitude. There is more than enough material to make the entire land surface of the Earth look like Manhatten, and have each building eco-friendly.
  23. JediMasterKitFisto Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 27, 2002
    star 6
    I think Geonosis is known to have less gravity than most planets. Thats how the geonosians fly. And I saw a documentary on Star Wars creatures and it said that Watto came from a planet with less gravity, so on his homeworld he would have an easier time flying.
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