Practicality Of Jedi Robes

Discussion in 'Cleveland, OH' started by TheRandomMenace, Mar 20, 2002.

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  1. TheRandomMenace Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 13, 2002
    star 4
    With the rainy weather today, something hit me. It seems to me that the Jedi robes aren't that practical. If they keep going on these missions to aquatic environments such as Otoh Gunga, Kamino, (and the unshown planet of Mon Calamari), then wouldn't it be more practical to have water-tread robes? I mean, Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon were lucky that Otoh Gunga has hydrostatic shields so that their clothes dried off quickly. Otherwise, they would have been sopping wet for most, if not the rest, of the film. Any other thoughts?
  2. JediKnightPasJoDacle Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 16, 2002
    star 4
    Easy answer, the Jedi Robes are not all the bolky and combersom as it looks. As explained somewhere on theStar Wars web site(forget where), that it is actually a thin free flowing material that when wet, it will still remain light. There was also this posted on the star wars web site
    ""The wool fabric from Episode I, we bought bales of it," says Trisha Biggar. "We discovered after we bought the fabric that it had been Second World War utility fabric, so it was made very heavy." Too heavy, it would seem, for Obi-Wan Kenobi's water-logged fisticuffs with Jango Fett. "On this Episode, we had that fabric recreated at a quarter of the weight. I know [Stunt Coordinator] Nick Gillard had his doubts about how it's going to be when it's wet, but I don't think it was as bad as he thought."

    Light enough for rain-soaked pugilism, but still too heavy for speeder bike use."

    Ask an I shall provide.
  3. TheRandomMenace Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 13, 2002
    star 4
    you are only rehashing information to me that i already knew. I saw that quote from trisha biggar on the official site. But your "explanation" still doesn't explain why the Jedi don't use water-tread material for their robes. Water-tread material is just as easy to maneuver in, could provide the same amount of warmth (if layered properly), and would also have the benefit of keeping them dry. So why don't they use it?
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