PT Red has a cultural meaning on Naboo

Discussion in 'Prequel Trilogy' started by darklordoftech, Jul 3, 2013.

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  1. darklordoftech Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 30, 2012
    star 6
    Then what does the cropping up mean?
  2. SithStarSlayer Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 23, 2003
    star 6
    Pops up, shows up, makes an appearance as an accent-color etc.
  3. darklordoftech Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 30, 2012
    star 6
    Why is it doing that stuff if it doesn't have a cultural meaning?
  4. ThatsNoPloKoon Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 24, 2013
    star 1
    Black also shows up a lot in padme's wardrobe. Does that mean black has a cultural meaning on Naboo? Sometimes a colour is just a colour.
    VanishingReality likes this.
  5. SithStarSlayer Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 23, 2003
    star 6
    OOU: Because the concept artist liked the contrast?
    IU: Because Padme's designer thought a splash of red would look great?

    If red meant something to the Naboo, we'd have seen a lot more of it.
    DarthDuckie likes this.
  6. Cryogenic Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 20, 2005
    star 4
    Would you swear to that in court? ;)

    That's a bit of a dodge. :p

    I think colours in general have a meaning on Naboo. Different colours, different meanings.

    Naboo is just a colourful planet in general. That is significant in and of itself.

    So, red means something, along with the other colours we see.

    Also, don't forget this line in TPM:

    "Blue, it's the boy. Red, his mother."

    (Spoken on Tatooine, yes, but also serves as a reminder that colours are ever at work and even in conflict).

    I'd say black is strongly correlated with mourning when the Queen switches to it -- also switching her own self from real to decoy -- in the early part of TPM when she's under arrest and then swanning off with the Jedi.

    Beyond that, it conveys a pure asceticism, evoking the void of space, the void of thought, the purity of the unknown, when it is seen in other configurations later on; or it could be interpreted on these terms. Such meanings could also apply in the instance described above (leaving the relative safety of even an occupied Naboo for the dangerous unknown of space). And a second example: Padme's dinner dress from AOTC: she's moving into unknown territory with Anakin, with her own heart.

    The inhabitants of Naboo have such an philosophic/artisan approach to things (or so it seems, to me) that they might even encourage each other in private, or certain members of their society, to wear whatever best reflects their internal state, so that they can attempt to reach within and find some deeper personal truth. It's one way of focusing the mind that the Jedi might also be said to use with their own attire. Or not. It comes down to personal opinion.

    It's kinda fun -- and in a way, quite necessary -- to let your imagination loose, a little, with these films. They are full of wondrous sights and sounds and arresting patterns just waiting for a mind to read them. The incomplete-circle forms in TPM are a good reminder of this: to complete the circle, we must use our own imagination; and to break it and start again, we must be prepared to let go and find a new angle (a theme very much encrusted in the PT, especially ROTS ... well, from a certain POV).
    Last edited by Cryogenic, Jul 8, 2013
  7. SithStarSlayer Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 23, 2003
    star 6
    I'm looking through a gallery of Naboo images...

    Based on how often I see that color not being used, I think they hate red.:p
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  8. Cryogenic Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 20, 2005
    star 4
    [Obi-Wan]Possibly.[/Obi-Wan] [face_whistling]
    SithStarSlayer likes this.
  9. Merkual Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 3, 2013
    star 4
    yeah I also see no cultural significanse to red on Naboo...
  10. Michael McKean Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jun 5, 2013
    star 1
    I think it probably is, but it is not the reason Palpatine covered his office in red. The reason for that, my friend, is because red symbolizes the Sith. We ourselves even often associate red with evil.
  11. darklordoftech Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 30, 2012
    star 6
    Just because the red is one of the devil's skin colors...
    ConnorLovesPadme likes this.
  12. Michael McKean Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jun 5, 2013
    star 1
    I was about to write 'the Devil', but thought that 'evil' would be more appropriate. On another note, the colour red is often seen in royalty, for example the British Royal Family, and the flag of the United Kingdom. The colour of a crown is usually red as well.
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