Amph Religion in SF/Fantasy

Discussion in 'Archive: SF&F: Books and Comics' started by Katana_Geldar, Dec 21, 2008.

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  1. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

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    Jul 20, 2002
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    You're looking for Kelsier :p

    I hadn't even thought about that in Twilight. I'd always attributed it to Edward growing up in a time when they was socially unacceptable.
  2. Elori Jedi Master

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    Mar 18, 2002
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    Ah! Kelsier! Hahahahaha my brain died on me and I just couldn't remember! Thank you! Too bad he died.. he was so cool. :(

    And yeah, Edward did grow up pretty Victorian. I'm not a historian so I can't say if Queen Victoria's moral influences can be attributed to anything religious or if it's just a social response to something else! But it's interesting to think about.
  3. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

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    [face_laugh] And I agree :(

    I don't know 100%, but if I had to guess I'd say that it was just religious morals over thousands of years seeped into the culture, so it had been socially unacceptable for a long time.
  4. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

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    I've finished Sanderson's trilogy, and I have to say, religion does play a big role. You wouldn't think so at the beginning, because in TFE it's just Sazed's thing, but in the end it's what allows him to put the world back the way it was supposed to be, since he knew what it was supposed to look like from his studies of the old texts. Plus, the whole Ruin/Preservation thing - they were gods, after all.

    In addition, though I know most of you probably haven't read them, Katherine Kurtz's books have religion as a major factor. I actually like the way it's protrayed, which really surprised me, since I'm really not into religion. But I liked the way she handled magic and religion co-existing, and that it was the bad guys who favored one over the other rather than respecting both. Since usually in stories like this the protagonist has to choose one or the other, the fact tha both together was the right choice is really nice. Kurtz presents Catholicism in a really nice light.
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