Rumors

Discussion in 'Archive: The Arena' started by Skiara, Jun 21, 2010.

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  1. Skiara ~• Manager WNU •~ ~• RSA FFC •~

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    Yesterday I listened to the radio and they said that the German soccer team (for the World Championship 2010) got a nickname and is simply called "the Mannschaft" or "el Mannschaft" or "il Mannschaft".

    Is that true? Does anybody know that?
  2. Strilo Manager Emeritus

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    Aug 6, 2001
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    I've not heard them called that in English...
  3. MarcusP2 Games and Community Reaper

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    Isn't that just the German word for team or something? Seems rather like the Brazilians being nicknamed 'the selected'.
  4. Skiara ~• Manager WNU •~ ~• RSA FFC •~

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    Yep, that's right. Mannschaft means team in English.

    On the hand I'm curious, if that what I heard is true, and on the other hand I had a following question in mind: Why did one pick that word as a nickname for the German team? Beside of the fact that Mannschaft means team as well of course.
  5. epic Ex Mod / RSA

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    Jul 4, 1999
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    what's all this about men's shafts now? [face_clown]
  6. Skiara ~• Manager WNU •~ ~• RSA FFC •~

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    :p



    I heard it again. Not at a radio station, but on one of the main tv stations.

    So, is there really no one who heard the German team being called "the/la Mannschaft"?


    Below is what I found on the internet about it...

    "That a German player named Mesut Özil scored the goal that sent his nation through to the second round of this year?s World Cup is a sign that something fundamental has changed about what it means to be German. A country which, until quite recently, refused to give citizenship even to the German-born children of immigrants now finds itself represented by a squad of 23 players so ethnically diverse that 11 of them could have chosen to play instead for other nations.

    The Telegraph?s Duncan White explained that the new Germans are drawn not just from neighboring countries that traditionally supplied Gastarbeiter to German industry, but also from across the globe:

    While there have been several Polish-Germans of Silesian background to have played for Germany (including Miroslav Klose and Lukas Podolski in this squad), Joachim Löw?s team also has players of Bosnian-Serb, Brazilian, Ghanaian, Nigerian, Polish, Tunisian and Turkish descent.

    As my colleague Rob Hughes reported in The Times, it is important not to get carried away with the melting pot narrative:

    Not all Germans embrace with open arms this son of Turkish descent who reads the Koran before games. But there are 1.7 million people of Turkish origin in Germany, and with the national team, the Mannschaft, becoming a league of many nations, there could be more nights like this, more new heroes like Özil
    ."
    (Source: Blog at NY Times)





    And at an article about the semi-finals of 1979 at the offical international football site (FIFA):

    "German pressure
    Although the Mannschaft clearly dominated the first period, the Italians often looked comfortable at the back, mopping up the somewhat predictable assaults of Seeler and Co
    ."

    "As the furious German side crowded around the ref, Beckenbauer stayed down, his right shoulder pulled out of joint, and since the Mannschaft had already made their two substitutions, the Kaiser had to stay on the field."


    So, really no one? :eek:
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