Scottish Universities

Discussion in 'Scotland' started by ObiMcD, Mar 19, 2003.

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  1. ObiMcD Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2000
    star 4
    Does anyone know which universities in Scotland have good film programs and/or good history programs? Preferably both. Thanks.
  2. Shara Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 4, 2000
    star 4
    And/or Anthropology programs too ;)
  3. ObiMcD Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2000
    star 4
    AAAAAAAAh! somebody hijacked my thread, j/k
  4. Darth_Haggis Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 21, 2002
    star 4
    I've heard that St. Andrews had a good history department.
  5. AngelaJade Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Feb 14, 2003
    star 1
    Ah, St. Andrews - my alma mater. :D

    It certainly used to have a good reputation for history - dunno what it's like these days. Not sure about film - I think Stirling used to be the place to go for drama/arts-type stuff.

    No idea about anthropology.

    :)
  6. Shara Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 4, 2000
    star 4
    Well I'm finishing up my Master's Degree in History, but my field of study is the British Isles and Western Europe. As my bf said, if I'm going to focus on that, why don't I look at going to school over there?

    And ObiMcD...umm sorry? :D
  7. AngelaJade Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Feb 14, 2003
    star 1
    Oh, yeah - come here to study. Best universities in the world. ;)

  8. Shara Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 4, 2000
    star 4
    Well why not. Scotland did have the first university in the Isles
  9. malkieD2 Ex-Manager and RSA

    Member Since:
    Jun 7, 2002
    star 7
    indeed, at one point there were as many universities in Aberdeen as there were in the whole of England !!

    Oh, I went to the University of Aberdeen - and it ROCKED !

    malkie
  10. Shara Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 4, 2000
    star 4
    Holy hand grenades, Malkie, their Cultural History and Social Anthropology programmes look great! *marks down University of Aberdeen as a prospective PhD uni*

    Thanks for the tip! :D
  11. MrDankDonk Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 28, 2001
    star 4
    Glasgow Caledonian does a media/journalism/popular culture type degree course....

    I remember fondly writing essays on Kubrick's camera angles in The Shining - and drinking cider and blackcurrant in the grotty union.

    Donk (Ba Media Studies)
  12. AngelaJade Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Feb 14, 2003
    star 1
    And now I live near Aberdeen! We could have a SW get-together! :D And it is a good Uni. :)

    Cider and blackcurrant?! Aaaargh! *beats off memories with a big stick*
  13. Shara Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 4, 2000
    star 4
    I was talking over the possibility of going to a Scottish/British Uni for my PhD and well I think it might be a problem for me. One, the prof I spoke to, who attended the U of Glasgow, had a lot of trouble because she couldn't do interdisciplinary studies. That may have changed, but it would almost be a must for me. Mostly that means being able to take classes in both History (Scottish, British, and European)and Anthropology, which back when she did it (about 10 or so years) that was impossible. Plus if I came back to the US, the teaching and preparatory styles are different and would make me less marketable here...and don't get me into being an American trying to get a job over there! :p

    I'll keep it in mind, but I'm going to have to look closer to home I'm afraid. Now if this is wrong, please correct me because I would like to make Scotland a possibility.
  14. Jingle-Jango Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Dundee University has got the best Bitches.
  15. malkieD2 Ex-Manager and RSA

    Member Since:
    Jun 7, 2002
    star 7
    had a lot of trouble because she couldn't do interdisciplinary studies


    that varies from University to University. Some Universities are extremely strict about which classes you have to take, while others allow you to pick and choose.

    When at Aberdeen, you have to take certain core classes, but then you could make up credits with something you were interested in. I did psychology, while my friend did geography.

    malkie
  16. AngelaJade Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Feb 14, 2003
    star 1
    Yup, depends on the university. Why not email the unis and ask if they'll let you do the courses you want? :)
  17. Shara Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 4, 2000
    star 4
    I think I just might do that ;)

    The only other concern I would have is the teaching style. I hear that the UK system isn't very preparatory for teaching. I considered a uni here in the States but they didn't offer much in preparing the student for teaching after they got their Master's and/or PhD. According to my prof, I wouldn't be very marketable back here in the states. *chuckles* That is, if I return ;)

    I am looking into, and have a meeting for it, to do a semester abroad through my uni during the time period I'll be working on my thesis for my Master's degree.
  18. malkieD2 Ex-Manager and RSA

    Member Since:
    Jun 7, 2002
    star 7
    I hear that the UK system isn't very preparatory for teaching


    again, that really depends on which institute you go to.

    You are correct in that some establishments are heavily geared towards producing fine research post doctorates, with limited teaching skills. For some people, this is exactly what they want - to do research, but not teach.

    Other Universities actually rely on doctorate students to help teaching classes, practical skills, tutorials and seminars, as they are far cheaper to use than regular Professors.

    My experience is that when I did my PhD, there was a large amount of teaching as part of my course. I spent lots of my time teaching practical skills to undergrads, supervising undergrad research projects, and being a source of information for anyone who needed it. Frequently, students found it easier to approach me rather than a Prof as I'm younger and easier to relate to.

    Despite spending a significant portion of my time teaching, I was still able to produce three full research papers, and three abstracts presentations in three years.

    As part of the PhD program I had to participate in in-house teaching courses in which I gained a postgrad certificate in education. I also completed a varied course in PDP (personal development program), which greatly helped in a number of things from inter-departmental collaberation skills to public relations, teaching and things as simple as time management.

    As mentioned at the start of this post, it really depends on which Uni you go to. As the above poster suggested, take the time to get incontact with the department you want to work in. Email them, or better still get them a telephone call (they do have phones in the UK ;) ) to find out exactly what they have to offer to suit your needs.

    If you have any futher questions, you can always PM me. I am Scottish, and have attended Universities in Scotland and England, and now work in the USA (so I have an understanding of some of the things you are thinking about).

    Dr malkie
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